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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
A bequest from Washington, D.C. arts patron Jean Montgomery Riddell, who died last year at the age of 100, has enriched the holdings of the Walters Art Museum with more than 260 objects of enameled Russian silver from the 17th through early 20th centuries. The Riddell collection includes items from the storied firm of Carl Fabergé. "About 20 years ago, [Riddell] came to the museum and I showed her what we had of Russian works," said William Johnston, senior curator at large and director of the archives at the Walters.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Johns Hopkins University scientists will share in one of the largest one-time philanthropic gifts for cancer research ever made, $540 million aimed at preventing and curing the disease, officials are scheduled to announce today. The $90 million marked for Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center - among the biggest donations for the center and the university - will help researchers build on pioneering work identifying the genetic mutations responsible for cancers. The money comes from the New York-based based Ludwig Cancer Research, an organization named for the late shipping tycoon Daniel K. Ludwig.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
William Donald Schaefer left $1.4 million to a civic fund that will make dozens of grants each year for neighborhood improvement projects in the city and Baltimore County, the Baltimore Community Foundation plans to announce today. The late governor and mayor, who died at 89 in April 2011, directed the money to the William Donald Schaefer Civic Fund, which is administered by the foundation. The bequest follows a gift of $400,000 Schaefer made to the fund in 2008. The new money is expected to produce interest that will finance about $70,000 in grants each year toward such projects as neighborhood fairs, community gardens and beautification efforts.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
The head of aerospace technology firm ARINC and his wife have pledged at least $11 million to Anne Arundel Medical Center, the largest bequest ever to the hospital. John and Cathy Belcher of Edgewater will give the first $1 million to the hospital over the next several years.  At least $10 million will go to the hospital after the couple's death when their estate is liquidated. That amount could be higher depending on the value of the estate. The hospital will rename the Health Sciences Pavillion the “John and Cathy Belcher Pavillion," in honor of the couple's gift.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
National Public Radio will announce today that it has received a bequest it calls "the largest monetary gift ever received by an American cultural institution." "They have a very generous donor who made a really big bequest. It's really slick," said U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer, an Oregon Democrat and co-chairman of the congressional Public Broadcasting Caucus. Neither Blumenauer nor NPR president Kevin Klose would provide further details, including the bequest amount or the giver. "I'm not talking about this today to anyone," Klose said last night.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
With support waning from United Way and frequent shifts in corporate and government giving, Howard County's nonprofits are working on a new fundraising strategy - bequests from increasingly wealthy baby boomers. It is a largely untapped source of money for charitable endowments that is easy to set up and often attractive to people with adult children who want to create a legacy, said consultant Jean Moon. Moon conducted a study of philanthropy last fall for the Columbia and the Horizon foundations.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2000
Battling over a gift of nearly $30 million, lawyers for two Baltimore health care institutions argued yesterday over which takes precedence, Maryland's anti-segregation policies or rules governing bequests. The attorneys, appearing before the state's highest court, are vying over a bequest from Dr. Jesse C. Coggins. In 1962, Coggins wrote a will leaving what was then a $2.3 million estate to the Keswick Home with the caveat that it use the money to house white patients and name the building for him. If that was unacceptable, the money was to go to University of Maryland Medical System, with no race restrictions.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2001
Dental surgeon Dr. Samuel H. Hoover never attended Western Maryland College. The lifelong Baltimore County resident didn't set foot on the school's Westminster campus until the late 1960s at age 65. Drawn by the school's community spirit and its commitment to liberal arts education, Hoover became a trustee and, with a gift of $2.2 million, the college's most generous living donor. Hoover, who died in October 2000 at age 97, also remembered the college in a bequest. His bequest of $2.9 million, announced by the school Monday, will double a major scholarship fund and support the library.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
The head of aerospace technology firm ARINC and his wife have pledged at least $11 million to Anne Arundel Medical Center, the largest bequest ever to the hospital. John and Cathy Belcher of Edgewater will give the first $1 million to the hospital over the next several years.  At least $10 million will go to the hospital after the couple's death when their estate is liquidated. That amount could be higher depending on the value of the estate. The hospital will rename the Health Sciences Pavillion the “John and Cathy Belcher Pavillion," in honor of the couple's gift.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2002
Overturning the terms of a segregation-era will, the state's highest court said yesterday that Keswick Multi-Care Center should receive a $31.6 million bequest that was originally designated for "white patients who need physical rehabilitation." "The illegal racially discriminatory condition" in the will "violates Maryland public policy," the court said in a unanimous 21-page opinion written by Judge John C. Eldridge. "Consequently the provisions of the will should be administered as if the word `white' was not contained in the bequest."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
McDaniel College announced Monday that a $6.7 million bequest will be used to establish an endowment for scholarships, the largest in its history. The funds come from the estate of Philip Henry Dorsey, who was part of a class of 18 earning a bachelor's degree from the Westminster school in 1891. After graduation, Dorsey went home to St. Mary's County, where he managed farmland and bought and sold crops. When he died in 1945, his will established a trust fund for his descendants to attend McDaniel, then known as Western Maryland College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
A reception will be held Wednesday at the Peabody Conservatory in honor of the late Mary C. Walker, who upon her death donated $800,000 to the institution where she studied and worked for most of her life. The bulk of Walker's gift - $600,000 - is being designated for undergraduate scholarships, the Conservatory announced recently. The remaining $200,000 will be split evenly between the alumni fund and the archives. Walker was a granddaughter of a man who made his fortune in the 19 t h century in the meatpacking business.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
William Donald Schaefer left $1.4 million to a civic fund that will make dozens of grants each year for neighborhood improvement projects in the city and Baltimore County, the Baltimore Community Foundation plans to announce today. The late governor and mayor, who died at 89 in April 2011, directed the money to the William Donald Schaefer Civic Fund, which is administered by the foundation. The bequest follows a gift of $400,000 Schaefer made to the fund in 2008. The new money is expected to produce interest that will finance about $70,000 in grants each year toward such projects as neighborhood fairs, community gardens and beautification efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
A bequest from Washington, D.C. arts patron Jean Montgomery Riddell, who died last year at the age of 100, has enriched the holdings of the Walters Art Museum with more than 260 objects of enameled Russian silver from the 17th through early 20th centuries. The Riddell collection includes items from the storied firm of Carl Fabergé. "About 20 years ago, [Riddell] came to the museum and I showed her what we had of Russian works," said William Johnston, senior curator at large and director of the archives at the Walters.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
A large wooded parcel along the bustling Route 24 corridor in Abingdon will become a regional arts center with theaters, galleries, classrooms and community meeting space under a proposal for how to use property unexpectedly left to Harford County by a widow who lived in New Jersey. A larger adjoining tract will be turned into public parkland — described by some as Harford's "Central Park" — under a county-backed plan. The area sits squarely in Harford's designated growth zone and is the largest undeveloped parcel between Interstate 95 and Bel Air, the county seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
In one of the largest gifts ever received by Baltimore's Walters Art Museum , a New Mexico collector is donating some 300 pieces and promising a $4 million bequest to shine a spotlight on the art of the ancient Americas. "This is a huge development for us," said Walters director Gary Vikan, noting that the soon-to-be-created center for the study of the arts of the ancient Americas should prove especially alluring to the area's "very vibrant" Latino community. "This is a huge new ingredient in building audience for us," he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1998
From the bleak days at Valley Forge to the triumph of liberty at Yorktown, Maryland's Lt. Col. Tench Tilghman wore his ceremonial officer's sword in the service of George Washington.Today, the state of Maryland will take possession of that sword and another owned by Tilghman, Washington's aide-de-camp, at Board of Public Works ceremony in Annapolis.The swords were left to the state in the will of Judith Goldsborough Oates, a great-great-granddaughter of Tilghman who died in Baltimore Dec. 26 at the age of 98. News of the bequest came "absolutely, completely out of the blue," said Edward C. Papenfuse, the state archivist.
NEWS
May 13, 2005
Johns Hopkins, the merchant, banker and philanthropist, was born May 19, 1795, in Anne Arundel County. His mother and father were Quakers and owned a tobacco planation. Acting on their Quaker beliefs on abolition, his parents freed the family slaves in 1807, which caused the young Johns to leave school and help with the grueling fieldwork. As a young man, he ventured to Baltimore to help an uncle in his wholesale grocery business. Before long, Hopkins established his own wholesale grocery and other businesses.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2011
An avid reader who considered the library a second home has left a $950,000 bequest to be shared by the Baltimore County Public Library and the Enoch Pratt Free Library . The city and county systems will share equally in the gift from Margaret S. "Peggy" Peterson, a retired county librarian and former Towson resident who died in 2006. "The library meant so much to Peggy from her childhood to her death," said Lynn Wheeler, a close friend and director of the Carroll County Public Library System.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
With its spindly legs supporting what could be a huge, weirdly shaped head, the metal sculpture seems about to walk off in search of a mate. Or maybe a world to invade — the object looks a little bit like the creatures in those old Martian invasion flicks. But " Head with Cogs for Eyes," a witty work from 1933 by pathbreaking American sculptor David Smith, isn't going anywhere. It's securely nestled in the Baltimore Museum of Art 's vibrant new exhibit, "Advancing Abstraction in Modern Sculpture.
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