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NEWS
March 15, 2004
On March 12, 2004 HERBERT LEROY; beloved husband of Ethel Bent (nee Van Gosen); devoted father of Sandra Butler of San Diego, CA, H. Lance Bent and Mark J. Bent. Also survived by five grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Witzke Funeral Home of Catonsville Inc., 1630 Edmondson Ave. (1 mi W. of Beltway exit 14) on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. where services will be held on Wednesday at 11 A.M. Interment in Woodlawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers family request donations be made to the charity of your choice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
What if braces were considered fashionable and could actually boost a patient's self-esteem? That was the question on the minds of the daughters of a Columbia pediatric dentist when they hit upon the idea of Bracket Ears - earrings made from oversized, surgical steel brackets that come with colorful bands to match with your braces. And further, what if a portion of the profits was tied to charitable contributions? “I never imagined I would be doing this,” says Dr. Casey Crafton of Crafton Dental, located off Old Columbia Road in Kings Contrivance.
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NEWS
March 16, 2004
Herbert Leroy Bent, who founded a plumbing business and owned several others, died Friday of cancer at Mariner Health of Catonsville. The Catonsville resident was 80. Born in McCook, Neb., he was raised in Hagerstown, where he attended Hagerstown High School and played the saxophone in the Johnny Summers Band in the late 1930s. He helped build aircraft at the Fairchild plant in Hagerstown before joining the Army and serving in Europe in World War II. After the war, he moved to Baltimore and founded the Benroy Diner on Caton Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Robin Williams was one of the most original, daring and troubled comedians to ever work in television. When he first burst on the screen, you held your breath as you watched him dance out there on a manic tightrope of improvisation. But after a while, you stopped wondering how he did it and learned to just enjoy the high of seeing him soar. The 63-year-old comedian and actor was found dead Monday at his home in Tiburon, Calif., north of San Francisco. The cause of death is suspected to be suicide by asphyxiation, according to the Marin County coroner's office.
FEATURES
By Curtis Morgan and Curtis Morgan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 20, 1998
When it debuted on the London stage in 1979, "Bent" broke new social ground. It dramatized a Nazi effort to rid the "master race" of yet another undesired group, homosexuals, and raised the pink triangle alongside the yellow star as a symbol of persecution and Holocaust horror.Nearly two decades later, the movie version of "Bent" still resonates but doesn't pack the same gut-wrenching power. The big screen and stagy direction have dulled its edge, but something even more interesting has been at work -- time and changing attitudes.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
Marie E. Bent, a former nurse and interior decorating shop owner, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Aug. 28 at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 91. Born Marie E. Hickstein in Ceballos, Cuba, and raised on the Buena Vista farm in Talbot County, she was a 1932 graduate of St. Michaels High School. She earned a diploma at the Delaware Hospital School of Nursing in Wilmington. Her marriage in 1942 to Lloyd A. Cherbonnier ended in divorce. In 1964, she married Harvey E. Gannon, who died in 1969.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
It's hard to imagine Mount St. Joseph's Brian Bent being nervous before a game. After all, as a freshman he caught former All-Metro Player of the Year Gavin Floyd, who is now a blue-chip pitching prospect in the Philadelphia Phillies' organization. However, it isn't often that a high school kid pitches against his uncle, who is the opposing coach, and his grandfather, an assistant. Bent, now a senior, put his family aside yesterday in Irvington and helped pitch the No. 4-ranked Gaels to a 6-1 nonleague victory over defending Class 4A state champion Thomas Johnson (0-1)
SPORTS
By Brant James and Brant James,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 30, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- Young talent made Duke the No. 1-ranked men's soccer team in the country, but youthful inexperience might have taken the top spot away.Led by two goals from senior forward Shane Dougherty and two assists from freshman midfielder Jason Bent, unranked Maryland survived a 51-minute man-disadvantage to upset previously unbeaten Duke, 4-1, yesterday at Ludwig Field.Maryland, which began the season ranked fourth in Soccer America's preseason poll, but fell from the rankings after a 1-1 tie with North Carolina State on Sept.
SPORTS
June 26, 2006
Good morning --David Beckham --The way you bent that kick, it could be in a movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | September 1, 1995
Writer-actor-director Sean Mathias, one of Britain's top young theater professionals, will make his feature directorial debut on "Bent," an adaptation of Martin Sherman's critically acclaimed Broadway play.Sarah Radclyffe, who produced such films as "My Beautiful Laundrette" and "Sirens," starring Hugh Grant, will produce. A controversial drama involving gays imprisoned in a Nazi-run concentration camp, "Bent" played on Broadway in 1979 and 1980 with Richard Gere and David Dukes in the cast.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
The Senate Intelligence Committee voted today to declassify portions of its report on the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" to extract information from terrorist detainees, but portions of the work that have been leaked appear to confirm Americans' worst fears about the secret program. Committee investigators found that the brutal treatment of prisoners was far more widespread than the agency has admitted and that CIA officials deliberately misled Congress about the effectiveness of methods that brought shame on the nation and amounted to little more than torture by another name.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
A 61-year-old man was killed when he was hit by an MTA bus in Northeast Baltimore's Coldstream Homestead Montebello neighborhood Thursday night, police said. The man, who police identified as James Payne, of the 8400 block of Roster Ave, had been standing at a bus stop near the corner of East 32nd Street and The Alameda when he bent down and fell in the street, where the bus hit him, police said. Family members at the scene said he had bent up to pick up gloves he had dropped. Police said witnesses at the scene and on the bus gave accounts of the incident, but anyone with information may call the department's accident investigation team at 410-396-2606.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 25, 2012
Presidents get the praise or blame for everything that happens on their watch, but, as Barack Obama has learned, the things the commander-in-chief can actually command are limited in number, thanks to James Madison and Newt Gingrich. Madison and his brilliant colleagues who invented the American system of government disagreed about many things, but they fervently agreed about one big thing: The coercive power of government needed to be held in check. They accomplished this by spreading the power around between the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
Obviously Gail Householder of Marriotsville must be both deaf and blind ("Obama inclined to compromise? Really?" Sept. 30). Anyone watching over the last two and a half years could not possibly have missed President Obama's repeated attempts to reach out to the Republicans, only to be repeatedly rebuffed. David A Liddle, Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | April 6, 2011
Wale, the DMV's most recognizable rapper, officially aligned himself with Rick Ross' Maybach Music last month, and the move had his core-fanbase wondering how it would impact his music. Wale and Rick Ross isn't a natural combination: Ross constructed a (likely) false persona on cocaine sales and mansions; Wale balances backpack, Okayplayer rhymes (read: "conscious") with exclusive-sneaker name-dropping. Or so I thought. Once Wale jumped on Waka Flocka Flame's mega-hit "No Hands" — with talks of "sweating out weaves" — he proved he could sound at home on swagged-out strip-club hits.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
Jared Gaither went into yesterday's game with a "use only in emergency" label on his sprained right shoulder. The emergency arrived early, the wraps came off quickly and the Ravens' precocious left tackle responded magnificently. Consider it another sign that Jonathan Ogden's old position is in capable hands. Gaither (Maryland) played deep into the fourth quarter of a 36-7 romp over the Philadelphia Eagles after a concussion forced his replacement, Adam Terry, to the sideline early in the first half.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 5, 1996
Some nostalgia buffs re-enact Civil War battles. Japanese and American fleets off Hawaii are bent on re-enacting Pearl Harbor.To restate: Relocating the Baltimore County Schools administration to Deer Park Elementary, and Deer Park children to Greenwood, would solve all problems.Cheer up. Israel got its first American prime minister.Pub Date: 6/05/96
NEWS
December 14, 1995
Police logElkridge: 6600 block of Santa Barbara Court: Burglars bent a fence at a business between Friday and Sunday, stole a jack from one of the vans parked in the lot and used it to lift another van and take a tire, police said.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | August 1, 2008
The huge white oak, towering over the sycamores, poplars and dogwoods around it, is bent in the middle, like a spindly old man reaching for a drink of water. The tree, known as the Wilmer Stone Oak and about 200 years old, did not always look like that. In 1988, burdened by its own weight, half of the tree's Y-shaped structure split from the trunk and crashed to the ground, ending forever the symmetrical beauty that had supported the huge crown under a robust pair of legs. Even in its wounded state, though, the tree's physique remains magnificent, its 128-foot height undiminished by age or the elements.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 24, 2008
Martin Luther King Jr. often said, "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice," and these words came to mind the other day as we learned the story of Lorraine Johnson, one of the original plaintiffs in Thompson v. HUD, the 13-year-old lawsuit brought by tenants of Baltimore's public housing ghettos against the federal agency that kept them there for so long. Johnson and other tenants had asked a federal judge to remedy decades of segregationist policies that left thousands of poor, black families stuck in the worst of living conditions.
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