Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBenny Goodman
IN THE NEWS

Benny Goodman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1998
Chesapeake Music Hall on U.S. 50 might be a far cry from Carnegie Hall in New York. But it was a magical place Sunday night as the Brooks Tegler Big Band re-created the historic 1938 Benny Goodman concert at the famous New York site.With clarinetist Joe Midiri playing Goodman's solos and the 14-piece band cooking behind him, you could have closed your eyes and thought you were in Carnegie Hall the first time jazz was played there. That concert is said to have legitimized jazz.Sunday's concert was part of the Jazz at the Music Hall series produced by John Tegler, Brooks' father.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2007
TOMMY NEWSOM, 78 Carson bandleader Tommy Newsom, the sax player whose soft-spoken demeanor led Johnny Carson to dub him "Mr. Excitement," died Saturday at his Portsmouth, Va., home, his family announced. Mr. Newsom, who spent 30 years as a musician and substitute bandleader for Mr. Carson's Tonight Show, died of complications from cancer. Mr. Newsom was a studio musician who was hired to tour with Benny Goodman in the early 1960s. By 1962, he had joined the NBC-TV staff orchestra that played on several shows, including The Tonight Show.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1998
Linthicum's Jo Barker scarcely had time to wrap up the Concerts in the Park series Aug. 16 when she had to get ready for the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum's concert season.Tickets were mailed Tuesday to PAAL's 650 subscribers, said Barker, the group's president.The 17th season has something for just about every taste, from classic swing to classical piano, choral barbershop harmonies to Broadway show tunes, brass ensembles and New Orleans jazz.The opening concert at 8 p.m. Sept.
NEWS
May 9, 2004
Barney Kessel, 80, a jazz guitarist who performed with Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and Art Tatum and backed other music greats, died of brain cancer Thursday at his San Diego home. His early style was heavily influenced by electric guitarist Charlie Christian, but he branched out in his early 20s, working with the big bands of Artie Shaw, Charlie Barnet and Benny Goodman. He was the only white musician in the 1944 jazz film Jammin' the Blues produced by Norman Granz. He served as a music ambassador during the Carter administration, becoming only the third person to be named to that office, along with Louis Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | April 28, 1992
BATTLES of the big bands are making a comeback.Popular in the 1930s and 1940s, the big band battles are playoffs to see which of two or more competing bands can be the first to drive an audience crazy. You can attend 1992 versions of these swinging free-for-alls at Hunt Valley and other locations (usually promoted by WITH, the big-band station in Baltimore).But there was an historic, definitive and positively Olympian battle of the big bands in New York in 1937. It was staged before thousands of fans who came from all over the country just to see and hear it. The winner was a Baltimorean.
NEWS
February 22, 1995
Yank Lawson, 83, a jazz trumpeter who played with renowned combos of the big band era, died Saturday in Indianapolis. He joined Ben Pollack's band in 1933 and the Bob Crosby band in 1934. He also played with Benny Goodman and Tommy Dorsey.
NEWS
May 9, 2004
Barney Kessel, 80, a jazz guitarist who performed with Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and Art Tatum and backed other music greats, died of brain cancer Thursday at his San Diego home. His early style was heavily influenced by electric guitarist Charlie Christian, but he branched out in his early 20s, working with the big bands of Artie Shaw, Charlie Barnet and Benny Goodman. He was the only white musician in the 1944 jazz film Jammin' the Blues produced by Norman Granz. He served as a music ambassador during the Carter administration, becoming only the third person to be named to that office, along with Louis Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie.
NEWS
May 1, 2007
TOMMY NEWSOM, 78 Carson bandleader Tommy Newsom, the sax player whose soft-spoken demeanor led Johnny Carson to dub him "Mr. Excitement," died Saturday at his Portsmouth, Va., home, his family announced. Mr. Newsom, who spent 30 years as a musician and substitute bandleader for Mr. Carson's Tonight Show, died of complications from cancer. Mr. Newsom was a studio musician who was hired to tour with Benny Goodman in the early 1960s. By 1962, he had joined the NBC-TV staff orchestra that played on several shows, including The Tonight Show.
NEWS
July 13, 1999
Helen Forrest, 82, who sang with the big bands of Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman, died Sunday of heart failure. She was "the most famous of all the big band singers" and recorded more than 500 songs, said Alan Eichler, her publicist.Born Helen Fogel in Atlantic City, N.J., she had several well-known recordings, including "All the Things You Are" with Shaw, "The Man I Love," with Goodman, and "I Don't Want to Walk Without You" and "I Had the Craziest Dream," with Harry James.Joel Baker Sr., 94, who designed several surgical techniques and was chief of surgery at the Virginia Mason Medical Center for more than 30 years, died July 4.Pub Date: 7/13/99
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 1998
Chesapeake Music Hall resumes its "Jazz At The Music Hall" series at 8 p.m. Sunday with a re-creation of clarinetist Benny Goodman's famous January 1938 Carnegie Hall concert.This first concert of the new year celebrates the first time jazz was played in the venerable hall in New York.Drummer Brooks Tegler leads a 13-piece orchestra that will perform everything heard that evening, from the opening "Don't Be That Way" to the closing "Sing, Sing, Sing.""Jazz At The Music Hall" is produced by jazz writer and broadcaster John Tegler, who will narrate the concert and tell how Goodman's orchestra was booked on a stage that had been considered too august for jazz musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 2003
If you're going to throw a party for the Baltimore Opera Company, it makes sense to feature a little singing. That's what happened at the Baltimore Opera Guild's Annual Spring Gala, held this year at the Hunt Valley home of Drs. Mahin Shamszad and Homayoon Farzadegan. Soprano Kathleen Stapleton performed at the gathering. So did the party's hostess. Mahin delivered a fine rendition, we hear, of "Happy Birthday." Seems six guests were celebrating their big days either the day before, day of, or day after the party.
NEWS
February 8, 2003
William Taylor Gabrielson, a retired warehouseman and railroad buff, died of pneumonia Feb. 1 at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 79 and lived in Northeast Baltimore. Mr. Gabrielson was born in Baltimore and raised on Fleet Street. He attended Patterson Park High School and enlisted in the Navy when he was 19. He served in the Pacific from 1942 to 1945 aboard the USS Conway, a destroyer. He also witnessed the atomic bomb test on Bikini Atoll in 1946. In 1950, he went to work as a warehouseman at Procter & Gamble's Locust Point plant.
NEWS
May 9, 2001
The student: Nick Gallas, 16 School: Atholton High School Special achievement: An accomplished clarinetist, Nick won the Fuchs Concerto Competition and is scheduled to play a solo with the Metropolitan Wind Symphony at the German Embassy in Washington on May 17. He also won the Concerto Competition at the Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan last summer and was selected as principal chair for the All Eastern Honors Orchestra. In March, he was featured on Public Radio International's program "From the Top."
NEWS
April 9, 2001
Dr. Lewis V. Lortz, 81, dentist, musician Dr. Lewis V. Lortz Jr., a dentist who led a band while in college, died Thursday of colon cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He would have turned 82 yesterday. Dr. Lortz played the clarinet and saxophone and led a popular dance band, Lew Lortz and his Orchestra, while a Loyola College student in the late 1930s and early '40s. The group played weddings, dance halls and hotels in the Baltimore area. A Baltimore native who attended City College, Dr. Lortz served in an Army band that toured the United States during World War II. After the war, he attended the University of Maryland dental school.
NEWS
December 17, 1999
Cathy Hainer, 38, a USA Today reporter who wrote poignantly about her fight with breast cancer, died Tuesday night at a hospice in Arlington, Va.She began keeping a diary, much of which was published in the newspaper, after her cancer was diagnosed in January 1998. The final entry, Dec. 6, quoted a verse that generally is attributed to Henry Van Dyke, comparing death to the sailing of a ship into the distance: "Her diminished size is in me, not in her, and just at the moment when someone at my side says, `There!
NEWS
July 13, 1999
Helen Forrest, 82, who sang with the big bands of Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman, died Sunday of heart failure. She was "the most famous of all the big band singers" and recorded more than 500 songs, said Alan Eichler, her publicist.Born Helen Fogel in Atlantic City, N.J., she had several well-known recordings, including "All the Things You Are" with Shaw, "The Man I Love," with Goodman, and "I Don't Want to Walk Without You" and "I Had the Craziest Dream," with Harry James.Joel Baker Sr., 94, who designed several surgical techniques and was chief of surgery at the Virginia Mason Medical Center for more than 30 years, died July 4.Pub Date: 7/13/99
NEWS
September 1, 1993
ADD THIS to your lore of Baltimore trivia: The parents of Benny Goodman, the King of Swing himself, met and were married in Baltimore in 1894, soon after both had immigrated to America.David Goodman was from Warsaw, Dora Rezinsky from Kovno (Kaunas) in Lithuania. Desperately poor, they moved to the Maxwell Street slums in Chicago where on May 30, 1909, the ninth of their 12 children was born. His name was Benjamin David Goodman and, as they say, the rest is history -- a history compellingly laid out in a new Goodman biography, "Swing, Swing, Swing" by Ross Firestone.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | February 26, 1993
They call him the next Harry Connick Jr. But that doesn't sit well with John Pizzarelli."Two young guys with big bands," says the 32-year-old jazz guitarist and singer from New Jersey. "I don't get angry about it. But I honestly think it stops after two young guys singing with big bands. He's doing his own music. I'm more in the tradition of where I came from."Where Mr. Pizzarelli came from has a lot to do with his success -- seven albums, including two for RCA Records, and opening performances for the Benny Goodman Sextet.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1998
Linthicum's Jo Barker scarcely had time to wrap up the Concerts in the Park series Aug. 16 when she had to get ready for the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum's concert season.Tickets were mailed Tuesday to PAAL's 650 subscribers, said Barker, the group's president.The 17th season has something for just about every taste, from classic swing to classical piano, choral barbershop harmonies to Broadway show tunes, brass ensembles and New Orleans jazz.The opening concert at 8 p.m. Sept.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.