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NEWS
By Henry Siegman | June 9, 1996
THE INTENSE international interest received by the election of Benjamin Netanyahu threatens to obscure and divert attention from a critical situation in the Palestinian territories whose amelioration cannot be postponed for some later time.A slower and more deliberate Israeli approach is not necessarily fatal to the ultimate success of such outstanding issues in the peace process as the Israeli-Syrian-Lebanese negotiations, further steps toward normalization with other Arab countries and even the beginning of the final status talks with the Palestinians.
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NEWS
May 28, 2011
Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to the U.S Congress on Tuesday ("Congress lauds Israeli leader," May 25) can be described as an attempt to deceive the American public that he is willing to make a "painful compromise with the Palestinians. " Throughout his speech to the U.S Congress, I only found the audience's reaction to his words to be surprising; the way the U.S. Congress would applaud his historical and contemporary semi-true statements regarding Israel's democratic and religious tolerance along with being the victim of Palestinian aggression.
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NEWS
By Bill Thompson | June 9, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON didn't like it. The liberal media in America and around the world didn't like it. Even George Bush's onetime secretary of state, Jim Baker, didn't like it.It must be good: the election of Benjamin Netanyahu as prime minister of Israel. Netanyahu won by the slimmest of margins over incumbent Israeli leader Shimon Peres, but he won. His victory is the best that could have happened, for Israel and for the world.But you wouldn't know that if you formed your opinions on the basis of the malarkey emanating from the White House and the liberal media.
NEWS
By Uri Dromi | February 13, 2009
JERUSALEM -On Wednesday, President Barack Obama called Israeli President Shimon Peres to congratulate him on the general elections held here the day before. The White House quoted President Obama's remark to President Peres that "the Israeli people should be very happy about the democratic example they have set for the world." The White House went on to tell us that the two men "had a good discussion." Ah, but how did the discussion proceed? Here is my best guess: "Mr. President, let me congratulate you on the general elections held in your country."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 29, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Completing a seven-month investigation, Israeli police recommended yesterday that former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, be tried on corruption charges. A conviction could doom any chance of a political comeback for the one-time star of the right-wing Likud bloc, who left public life after soundly losing his bid for re-election last year to Ehud Barak. Police urged that the former prime minister be formally charged with taking a bribe, fraud, breach of trust and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
May 31, 1996
BENJAMIN NETANYAHU's apparent victory as prime minister of Israel along with a fractious Knesset can only disappoint proponents of peace between Israel and its neighbors. This is a setback for the U.S. government, which has invested mightily for peace in the Middle East, and for those Arab leaders cooperating with the effort.Israeli voters did not reject peace. They doubted Arab commitment to it. They voted their anger and anxiety at acts of terror against Israelis from Hamas and Hezbollah, which dramatically increased with autonomy for the Palestinian Authority.
NEWS
By Uri Dromi | February 13, 2009
JERUSALEM -On Wednesday, President Barack Obama called Israeli President Shimon Peres to congratulate him on the general elections held here the day before. The White House quoted President Obama's remark to President Peres that "the Israeli people should be very happy about the democratic example they have set for the world." The White House went on to tell us that the two men "had a good discussion." Ah, but how did the discussion proceed? Here is my best guess: "Mr. President, let me congratulate you on the general elections held in your country."
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - George W. Bush accused the Clinton administration yesterday of interfering in Israel's internal affairs, charging the White House with backing Ehud Barak over Benjamin Netanyahu in Israeli elections last year. "In recent times, Washington has tried to make Israel conform to its own plans and timetables," the likely Republican presidential nominee told a powerful pro-Israel lobbying organization. "A clear and bad example was the administration's attempt to take sides in the most recent Israeli election.
NEWS
May 28, 2011
Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to the U.S Congress on Tuesday ("Congress lauds Israeli leader," May 25) can be described as an attempt to deceive the American public that he is willing to make a "painful compromise with the Palestinians. " Throughout his speech to the U.S Congress, I only found the audience's reaction to his words to be surprising; the way the U.S. Congress would applaud his historical and contemporary semi-true statements regarding Israel's democratic and religious tolerance along with being the victim of Palestinian aggression.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 1997
JERUSALEM -- When Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu signed off on the deal to withdraw Israeli forces from Hebron last week, he became the first leader of the Likud bloc ever to give away a piece of Eretz Israel -- the biblical Land of Israel.He departed from the fundamental principle of his wing of Zionism: land for peace -- up to a point; biblical Judea and Samaria -- not an inch. For this he was reviled by some of his own staunchest constituents and applauded by the other side.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 11, 2000
JERUSALEM - Benjamin Netanyahu plunged into the race for Israeli prime minister last night, offering to lead the right wing back to power and challenging parliament to remove technical barriers to his candidacy. The former prime minister announced his return to politics in a prime-time, televised news conference that set in motion a frantic legal and political scramble with high stakes for the whole region. "I present my candidacy today for prime minister and head of the Likud party," Netanyahu declared.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - George W. Bush accused the Clinton administration yesterday of interfering in Israel's internal affairs, charging the White House with backing Ehud Barak over Benjamin Netanyahu in Israeli elections last year. "In recent times, Washington has tried to make Israel conform to its own plans and timetables," the likely Republican presidential nominee told a powerful pro-Israel lobbying organization. "A clear and bad example was the administration's attempt to take sides in the most recent Israeli election.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 29, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Completing a seven-month investigation, Israeli police recommended yesterday that former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, be tried on corruption charges. A conviction could doom any chance of a political comeback for the one-time star of the right-wing Likud bloc, who left public life after soundly losing his bid for re-election last year to Ehud Barak. Police urged that the former prime minister be formally charged with taking a bribe, fraud, breach of trust and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
June 3, 1999
BENJAMIN Netanyahu is leaving Israeli politics as stormily as he entered. His departure from the Knesset, as well as from the leadership of Likud, gives that party a chance to recover from its election disaster. Much remains to argue about in coming months, but Mr. Netanyahu won't be the issue.No politician is washed up at 49, though.Mr. Netanyahu won't be far away. If events sour under the prime ministry of Ehud Barak, with security compromised or terrorism renewed, Mr. Netanyahu will retain told-you-so appeal.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | May 23, 1999
THE Israeli elections produced a strong personal mandate for Ehud Barak as prime minister -- and a stinging rejection of the policies and machinations of Benjamin Netanyahu -- but they settled none of the divisions in Israeli society and may even have exacerbated a few.Mr. Barak has no easy tasks ahead of him in working up the unity he wishes for within Israel or in carrying out what he hopes will be the end game in the Middle East peace process. There are forces within and outside the country committed to make each challenge difficult, and impossible if they can.Mr.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 7, 1999
ASHQELON, Israel -- In the crowd at the Russian Delicatesse in this seaside town, the candidates competing to be Israel's next prime minister should head for Tatiana Vilensky, the round-faced former music teacher slicing ham behind the counter. Vilensky, 45, arrived in Israel from her native Belarus 2 1/2 years ago. She has never voted in an Israeli election. Like thousands of immigrants from the former Soviet Union, she hasn't decided for whom to vote in the May 17 elections. "I'm pondering, for and against," Vilensky said of the candidates clamoring for her vote.
NEWS
June 3, 1999
BENJAMIN Netanyahu is leaving Israeli politics as stormily as he entered. His departure from the Knesset, as well as from the leadership of Likud, gives that party a chance to recover from its election disaster. Much remains to argue about in coming months, but Mr. Netanyahu won't be the issue.No politician is washed up at 49, though.Mr. Netanyahu won't be far away. If events sour under the prime ministry of Ehud Barak, with security compromised or terrorism renewed, Mr. Netanyahu will retain told-you-so appeal.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | September 15, 1997
PARIS -- In little more than a year, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has changed from a secular combat to a religious war. A secular conflict is negotiable. A religious conflict is not, since the claims made by both sides have to do with eschatology and destiny. You cannot compromise when what you are struggling for is the expression of God's will.The Clinton administration bears a serious part of the responsibility for this change. It abandoned the previous XTC American role of impartial arbitrator between Jews and Arabs.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 24, 1997
DAMASCUS, Syria -- In the Old City market, where the eyes of the president gaze down from huge murals and where the ears of the president's spies are always near, no one whispers anymore of Israel and peace.Now the Syrians talk quietly of Iran and Iraq, the untrustworthy Americans, and a lost opportunity for peace."We no longer believe that we'll make peace with Disneyland," said a young man who gave his name as Aladdin, and who used Disneyland as a code word for Israel."We no longer say anything about peace.
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