Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBenjamin Moore
IN THE NEWS

Benjamin Moore

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
Staff Reports | July 10, 2013
Howard County officials announced this week that Ellicott City has been selected as one of 20 winners in a contest that aims to give a fresh coat of paint to local communities. The "Paint What Matters" contest, staged by Benjamin Moore, called on communities across the country and Canada to vote for themselves to be selected. At the end of the six-week campaign, Ellicott City was named among a list winners that stretched from Attleboro, Mass., to Hilo, Hawaii. Benjamin Moore will provide paint, stain and supplies to help upgrade facades, porches, railings and other exterior building features in Ellicott City.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
A maker of specialty paints is closing its Baltimore operations and eliminating 52 positions, the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation announced Friday morning. Complementary Coatings Corp., based in Montvale, N.J., is closing its facility in the Canton Industrial Area of southeast Baltimore between Sept. 13 and Dec. 31, the labor department said. The company, a division of Benjamin Moore, makes several brands of industrial coatings, wood stains and finishes including Coronado, Insl-x, Maxum, Lenmar and Trinity.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
A maker of specialty paints is closing its Baltimore operations and eliminating 52 positions, the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation announced Friday morning. Complementary Coatings Corp., based in Montvale, N.J., is closing its facility in the Canton Industrial Area of southeast Baltimore between Sept. 13 and Dec. 31, the labor department said. The company, a division of Benjamin Moore, makes several brands of industrial coatings, wood stains and finishes including Coronado, Insl-x, Maxum, Lenmar and Trinity.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
Ellicott City celebrates Benjamin Moore win It's a story about paint. It's also about social media and more importantly, a community, said Howard County Executive Ken Ulman at a gathering among Main Street Ellicott City business owners last week at the Howard County Tourism and Promotion Welcome Center. The event celebrated the town's victory as a finalist in the Benjamin Moore Main Street Matters Campaign. Ellicott City was named one of 20 finalists in the contest, which ran for six weeks this summer.
BUSINESS
By Laurie Squire | October 24, 2004
The product: interior paint. The expert: Debbie "the Queen of Paint" Travis - TV celebrity (Debbie Travis' Painted House, Debbie Travis' Facelift) and author of several best-selling decorating books. "People don't really love white. ... They're just afraid to make a mistake." What I want: Good coverage. Pricey, but if you don't use a quality paint, you'll end up using more. I must have: Matte with a chalk finish is lovely. ... Light bounces off really well and, unlike traditional flat paint, you can clean it. What I hate: Paint chips are so bloody small: How can they expect people to picture a whole room based on that tiny paper?
FEATURES
By RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER | January 21, 2006
Resolving to lose weight, save more or stop smoking are common resolutions sure to be broken soon. Why not try something different? Danny Seo, who hosts a show on Sirius Satellite Radio's LIME channel aimed at educating people on how to lead greener, cleaner, more-balanced lives, says these are among his top eco-styling tips for 2006. Sleep smarter: If you are in the market for new bedding, check out Ingeo fiber comforters and pillows (at Target stores and target.com). Ingeo is a corn-based, biodegradable down feather alternative that is hypoallergenic.
NEWS
By Jill Kubatko and Jill Kubatko,Sun Staff | April 28, 2002
In the 1970s, the pop group Chicago sang "Color My World." Today authors, paint companies, Web sites, magazines and interior designers all want to help you discover your world in color. Shades of green have restful, natural, soothing effects on the human psyche, as do blues and taupes. At the other end of the spectrum, bright reds, yellows and oranges bring excitement, conversation and emotional responses. Paint companies are turning to peaceful palettes to enhance your mood and give a sense of harmony.
BUSINESS
By Anne Kenderdine and Anne Kenderdine,The Washington Post | May 17, 2009
Real estate agents, home stagers and decorators strongly recommend painting a home in neutral colors to help it sell faster. Why? "Today's buyer doesn't want any work," says home stager Carol Buckalew of Frederick. You don't want buyers to walk into a house and immediately think about the extra costs of repainting because they have a strong reaction to a color, she says. Neutral colors also help a property look best in photographs online, says Long & Foster real estate agent Deb Gorham.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | August 4, 1996
Call it paint-chip paranoia. You have been burnt before; your confidence has been shaken.How many times have you taken these tiny samples home and tried to match them to fabric or a color in a painting? Even when you take a fabric or picture into the store for computer matching, the color rarely turns out the way you envisioned.The paint looks too dark or too light. The terra cotta that appeared sensational in a small chip looks disgusting on a big wall.So how can those chic decorating magazines and designer show houses use unusual colors that work perfectly?
NEWS
July 11, 2013
Ellicott City celebrates Benjamin Moore win It's a story about paint. It's also about social media and more importantly, a community, said Howard County Executive Ken Ulman at a gathering among Main Street Ellicott City business owners last week at the Howard County Tourism and Promotion Welcome Center. The event celebrated the town's victory as a finalist in the Benjamin Moore Main Street Matters Campaign. Ellicott City was named one of 20 finalists in the contest, which ran for six weeks this summer.
NEWS
Staff Reports | July 10, 2013
Howard County officials announced this week that Ellicott City has been selected as one of 20 winners in a contest that aims to give a fresh coat of paint to local communities. The "Paint What Matters" contest, staged by Benjamin Moore, called on communities across the country and Canada to vote for themselves to be selected. At the end of the six-week campaign, Ellicott City was named among a list winners that stretched from Attleboro, Mass., to Hilo, Hawaii. Benjamin Moore will provide paint, stain and supplies to help upgrade facades, porches, railings and other exterior building features in Ellicott City.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | August 25, 2011
When I started covering architecture and interior design back in the late 1990s, interviews with homeowners and designers about their projects inevitably turned to manila folders or three-ring binders thick with fabric swatches, torn-out magazine pages, measurements, calculations, paint chips and sketches. Today, that design file hasn't been replaced, but it's being augmented with a bevy of smartphone and tablet applications that help eliminate lugging a messy binder crammed with loose pages from home to the design studio or paint store and back.
BUSINESS
By Anne Kenderdine and Anne Kenderdine,The Washington Post | May 17, 2009
Real estate agents, home stagers and decorators strongly recommend painting a home in neutral colors to help it sell faster. Why? "Today's buyer doesn't want any work," says home stager Carol Buckalew of Frederick. You don't want buyers to walk into a house and immediately think about the extra costs of repainting because they have a strong reaction to a color, she says. Neutral colors also help a property look best in photographs online, says Long & Foster real estate agent Deb Gorham.
FEATURES
By RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER | January 21, 2006
Resolving to lose weight, save more or stop smoking are common resolutions sure to be broken soon. Why not try something different? Danny Seo, who hosts a show on Sirius Satellite Radio's LIME channel aimed at educating people on how to lead greener, cleaner, more-balanced lives, says these are among his top eco-styling tips for 2006. Sleep smarter: If you are in the market for new bedding, check out Ingeo fiber comforters and pillows (at Target stores and target.com). Ingeo is a corn-based, biodegradable down feather alternative that is hypoallergenic.
BUSINESS
By Laurie Squire | October 24, 2004
The product: interior paint. The expert: Debbie "the Queen of Paint" Travis - TV celebrity (Debbie Travis' Painted House, Debbie Travis' Facelift) and author of several best-selling decorating books. "People don't really love white. ... They're just afraid to make a mistake." What I want: Good coverage. Pricey, but if you don't use a quality paint, you'll end up using more. I must have: Matte with a chalk finish is lovely. ... Light bounces off really well and, unlike traditional flat paint, you can clean it. What I hate: Paint chips are so bloody small: How can they expect people to picture a whole room based on that tiny paper?
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and By Sarah Kickler Kelber,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
If one of your New Year's resolutions is to reduce your stress level, consider creating a comfort zone in your home. The American Furniture Manufacturers Association suggests taking the following steps to create the most relaxing area possible: * Consider your lifestyle. A family with young kids will want a different space than a neat freak will. (One option for the family is the Berkline reclining sectional, left. Depending on options, the piece retails for $1,999-$2,499 in fabric and is also available in leather.
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and By Sarah Kickler Kelber,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
If one of your New Year's resolutions is to reduce your stress level, consider creating a comfort zone in your home. The American Furniture Manufacturers Association suggests taking the following steps to create the most relaxing area possible: * Consider your lifestyle. A family with young kids will want a different space than a neat freak will. (One option for the family is the Berkline reclining sectional, left. Depending on options, the piece retails for $1,999-$2,499 in fabric and is also available in leather.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | August 25, 2011
When I started covering architecture and interior design back in the late 1990s, interviews with homeowners and designers about their projects inevitably turned to manila folders or three-ring binders thick with fabric swatches, torn-out magazine pages, measurements, calculations, paint chips and sketches. Today, that design file hasn't been replaced, but it's being augmented with a bevy of smartphone and tablet applications that help eliminate lugging a messy binder crammed with loose pages from home to the design studio or paint store and back.
NEWS
By Jill Kubatko and Jill Kubatko,Sun Staff | April 28, 2002
In the 1970s, the pop group Chicago sang "Color My World." Today authors, paint companies, Web sites, magazines and interior designers all want to help you discover your world in color. Shades of green have restful, natural, soothing effects on the human psyche, as do blues and taupes. At the other end of the spectrum, bright reds, yellows and oranges bring excitement, conversation and emotional responses. Paint companies are turning to peaceful palettes to enhance your mood and give a sense of harmony.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | August 4, 1996
Call it paint-chip paranoia. You have been burnt before; your confidence has been shaken.How many times have you taken these tiny samples home and tried to match them to fabric or a color in a painting? Even when you take a fabric or picture into the store for computer matching, the color rarely turns out the way you envisioned.The paint looks too dark or too light. The terra cotta that appeared sensational in a small chip looks disgusting on a big wall.So how can those chic decorating magazines and designer show houses use unusual colors that work perfectly?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.