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Benjamin Henry Latrobe

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Charles H. Latrobe III, a retired Koppers Co. executive who was a highly decorated World War II Navy night fighter pilot, died Feb. 16 of complications from pneumonia at Roland Park Place. He was 90. "He was a very private person who had the highest level of integrity possible and was intolerant of those who did not," said Joseph M. Coale III, a political adviser, Baltimore County preservationist and former head of Historic Annapolis. Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Charles Hazlehurst Latrobe III was 3 when he moved to a home on Ridgewood Road in Roland Park with his family in 1926.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
On Aug, 24, 2011, the earthquake that jolted the East Coast from Georgia to Quebec rattled through the bricks, plaster and paint of one of Baltimore's architectural jewels, the Basilica of the Assumption, sending nearly 1,000 linear feet of cracks through its ceilings and walls. On Sunday, as Christians worldwide commemorate the resurrection of Christ on Easter, the 207-year-old cathedral, too, will enjoy a rebirth. Construction workers have put the finishing touches on a seven-month, $3 million restoration job, and Sunday morning's Mass will mark the formal reopening.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
On Aug, 24, 2011, the earthquake that jolted the East Coast from Georgia to Quebec rattled through the bricks, plaster and paint of one of Baltimore's architectural jewels, the Basilica of the Assumption, sending nearly 1,000 linear feet of cracks through its ceilings and walls. On Sunday, as Christians worldwide commemorate the resurrection of Christ on Easter, the 207-year-old cathedral, too, will enjoy a rebirth. Construction workers have put the finishing touches on a seven-month, $3 million restoration job, and Sunday morning's Mass will mark the formal reopening.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Charles H. Latrobe III, a retired Koppers Co. executive who was a highly decorated World War II Navy night fighter pilot, died Feb. 16 of complications from pneumonia at Roland Park Place. He was 90. "He was a very private person who had the highest level of integrity possible and was intolerant of those who did not," said Joseph M. Coale III, a political adviser, Baltimore County preservationist and former head of Historic Annapolis. Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Charles Hazlehurst Latrobe III was 3 when he moved to a home on Ridgewood Road in Roland Park with his family in 1926.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2000
Things are looking up for the eight aged marble columns that have been lying ignobly along Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis for several months. Within weeks, they are expected to rise again for the first time in nearly 30 years. Workers are shoring up the conx crete foundation outside the Robert F. Sweeney District Courthouse so it can support the scrolled Ionic columns, which stand 16 feet tall and weigh 2 tons each. The resurrection will restore some glory to the pillars, first used in the 1820 Baltimore Exchange and Customs House and later at the Maryland Court of Appeals Building in Annapolis, which was razed in 1972.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 15, 2002
Maryland has a Latrobe House, a Latrobe Hall and a Latrobe Building. But how many people really know who Latrobe was? A nationwide alliance called Latrobe's America has been formed to preserve the work and vision of Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the nation's first professional architect and the man widely considered the father of American architecture. The consortium brings together for the first time nine organizations and historic sites that share Latrobe's legacy, including structures, artifacts and writings.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2000
Things are looking up for the eight aged marble columns that have been lying ignobly along Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis for several months. Within weeks, they are expected to rise again for the first time in nearly 30 years. Workers are shoring up the concrete foundation outside the Robert F. Sweeney District Courthouse so it can support the scrolled Ionic columns, which stand 16 feet tall and weigh 2 tons each. The resurrection will restore some glory to the pillars, first used in the 1820 Baltimore Exchange and Customs House and later at the Maryland Court of Appeals Building in Annapolis, which was razed in 1972.
NEWS
November 29, 2005
Cardinal William H. Keeler has a vision for restoring the architectural significance of the Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary and enhancing its religious prominence. That vision extends beyond the present $32 million restoration and modernization project to redeveloping the entire Baltimore block on which the historic 19th century church sits. It's a plan that excludes preserving the Rochambeau, a century-old former apartment building - and that may be its flaw. The Catholic archdiocese is awaiting a decision from the city on its request to demolish the Rochambeau.
NEWS
March 16, 2006
From the beginning, light illuminates the biblical narrative. As an image and a symbol, it signals the presence of God, throughout the world and within man. And so it would be that yesterday, the interior of the nearly restored Basilica of the Assumption was aglow with sunlight, the old cathedral's new linen-white palette reflecting the simplicity of Benjamin Henry Latrobe's neoclassic design. The intent of the $32 million renovation was to restore the nation's first Roman Catholic cathedral to its 19th-century origins, and it mostly reflects that vision.
NEWS
April 19, 2004
A colorful joke During preservationist lawyer John C. Murphy's speech to the Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation last week, he championed the beauty of the colorful stained-glass windows in Baltimore's Basilica of the Assumption. But his impassioned PowerPoint presentation turned out to be in vain. The commission voted 5-2 to approve the Basilica's restoration plan to replace the nine storytelling windows -- added in the 1940s -- with clear glass panels to allow the luminous natural light that famed architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe intended to stream into the 1821 Basilica's dome and tall windows.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
Lawrence E. Lewis, an engineer who led the restoration of his profession's Mount Vernon Place clubhouse, died Sunday of brain cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 55 and lived in Lutherville. A project manager and design team leader for the state's Department of General Services, he oversaw construction of the Sweeney District Court House in Annapolis, a Towson University dormitory and the Salisbury State Student Center. He also led the conversion of the former downtown Hutzler's department store into the Saratoga State Office Building.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
More than 35 people, their opinions sharply divided about whether Baltimore's Basilica of the Assumption should replace nine historic stained-glass windows as part of a $32 million project to restore the cathedral, turned out last night for a city hearing that was to decide the project's fate. The city's commission on historic and architectural preservation hadn't rendered a decision by late last night after hearing testimony from supporters and opponents of the restoration. Among the critics who spoke at the meeting was Stuart Seipple, a graduate student who grew up in Baltimore and comes from an eighth-generation Catholic family who attended Mass at the Basilica when he was a child.
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