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Benjamin Harrison

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NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2000
Hard money. Soft money. In the Gilded Age presidential election of 1888, it was just plain money - boodles of it raised in unprecedented amounts and expended in masterful ways. The key man in the making of President Benjamin Harrison, deservedly one of the lesser-known occupants of the White House, was Matthew S. Quay, the Republican boss of Pennsylvania. His grateful counterpart in New York, Thomas Platt, otherwise known as the "Easy Boss," called Quay "the ablest politician this country ever produced."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
If you want to break the boredom of a late winter Sunday, you could raise a cup of cheer to the memory of President William Henry Harrison, the nation's ninth president, who was sworn into office 171 years ago today. I'm also certain the details of Harrison's brief tenure as the nation's chief executive — he is better known as an Indian fighter (the Battle of Tippecanoe) and a general in the War of 1812 — are not on the tip of everyone's tongue. The one thing everyone knows about Harrison is the catchy presidential campaign slogan "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too," when Harrison was the Whig Party candidate in the 1840 presidential election with his running mate, John Tyler.
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NEWS
January 25, 1995
Albertis S. Harrison Jr., 88, who was Virginia's governor from 1962 to 1966 while the state struggled with school desegregation, died Monday in Lawrenceville, Va. He was related to Benjamin Harrison, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and two presidents, William Henry Harrison and Benjamin Harrison.Arthur Cohen, 74, an engineer who helped to develop the proximity fuse detonator, a battlefield device that caused enemy missiles to explode prematurely, saving many soldiers' lives in World War II, died of cancer on Jan. 12. He resided in Flemington, N.J.
NEWS
July 20, 2005
Benjamin Franklin Harrison, a retired electronics technician and amateur radio operator, died of colon cancer July 13 at Harmony Hall nursing home in Columbia. He was 83. Mr. Harrison was born in Bethany, Mo., and as a teenager moved to Kansas City, Mo., where he studied electronics at a technical school. He enlisted in the Navy in 1941 and served as an electronics technician in Washington and in the Pacific. Discharged from the Navy in 1945, Mr. Harrison re-enlisted the next year. He was an aviation electronics technician and had attained the rank of chief petty officer.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 28, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 26th was held in 1888, by which time the tariff had become the dominant issue.President Cleveland and the Democrats wanted to revise it down. The Republicans, the party of businessmen who wanted the price of foreign products kept high, opposed this.An innovation of this campaign was the use of private Republican clubs organized by industrialists to finance the campaign.The Republicans nominated Indiana Sen. Benjamin Harrison, a war hero and grandson of President William Henry Harrison.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
On February 26, 2005, SANTINA (nee Coco); beloved wife of the late Joseph Culotta; devoted mother of Frank S. Culotta and his wife Ann L. and the late Salvatore J. Culotta; loving grandmother of Suzanne and Jamie Hersh, Karen and Rick Harrison, Cheryl Higgs, Brian and Heather Mays and the late Frank R. Culotta; dearest great-grandmother of Eric and Kevin Mays, Elizabeth Hersh, Kasey, Joshua and Benjamin Harrison, Cheyenne and Justin Higgs. Friends may call at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14)
FEATURES
By Patricia Beach Smith and Patricia Beach Smith,McClatchy News Service | October 3, 1993
Mary Emmerling is "hot," if you can call anyone as cool as she is "hot.""Yeah, I have just been discovered," she says. "I am like those actors who have been working for decades and someone finally discovers them. I wrote 'American Country West' 10 years ago, and people are just beginning to learn about it. That's OK. I couldn't be luckier. After all, I have the New York Times and Lexington Furniture behind me now."The New York Times is publishing Ms. Emmerling's latest endeavor, a charming magazine called Mary Emmerling's Country, the first issue of which is now on newsstands.
NEWS
August 20, 1993
PRESIDENT Bill Clinton celebrated his 47th birthday yesterday. He is the third person to turn that age while president.The first was Ulysses S. Grant. He was born April 27, 1822. He was 46 when he took office on March 4, 1869, and became 47 seven weeks later. The second president to turn 47 in the White House was Theodore Roosevelt. TR was born Oct. 27, 1858. He became president upon the death of William McKinley on March 13, 1901. So he celebrated his 43rd, 44th, 45th and 46th birthdays while president.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
If you want to break the boredom of a late winter Sunday, you could raise a cup of cheer to the memory of President William Henry Harrison, the nation's ninth president, who was sworn into office 171 years ago today. I'm also certain the details of Harrison's brief tenure as the nation's chief executive — he is better known as an Indian fighter (the Battle of Tippecanoe) and a general in the War of 1812 — are not on the tip of everyone's tongue. The one thing everyone knows about Harrison is the catchy presidential campaign slogan "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too," when Harrison was the Whig Party candidate in the 1840 presidential election with his running mate, John Tyler.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 12, 1991
SEAFORD, Del. -- The last lesson Victoria L. Eastburn learned in high school was "what a president of the United States can do for somebody" when he attends their graduation exercises as George Bush did here yesterday:* He can turn valedictorians like Ms. Eastburn and classmate William T. Gibbs into local celebrities with days of attention from radio, television and newspaper reporters eager for angles on a presidential visit.* He can mention the two in his commencement speech, citing them as examples of how "family, faith and determination" can help high school dropouts overcome years of obstacles and mountains of hardship to obtain their degrees in night school.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
On February 26, 2005, SANTINA (nee Coco); beloved wife of the late Joseph Culotta; devoted mother of Frank S. Culotta and his wife Ann L. and the late Salvatore J. Culotta; loving grandmother of Suzanne and Jamie Hersh, Karen and Rick Harrison, Cheryl Higgs, Brian and Heather Mays and the late Frank R. Culotta; dearest great-grandmother of Eric and Kevin Mays, Elizabeth Hersh, Kasey, Joshua and Benjamin Harrison, Cheyenne and Justin Higgs. Friends may call at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14)
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2000
Hard money. Soft money. In the Gilded Age presidential election of 1888, it was just plain money - boodles of it raised in unprecedented amounts and expended in masterful ways. The key man in the making of President Benjamin Harrison, deservedly one of the lesser-known occupants of the White House, was Matthew S. Quay, the Republican boss of Pennsylvania. His grateful counterpart in New York, Thomas Platt, otherwise known as the "Easy Boss," called Quay "the ablest politician this country ever produced."
NEWS
January 25, 1995
Albertis S. Harrison Jr., 88, who was Virginia's governor from 1962 to 1966 while the state struggled with school desegregation, died Monday in Lawrenceville, Va. He was related to Benjamin Harrison, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and two presidents, William Henry Harrison and Benjamin Harrison.Arthur Cohen, 74, an engineer who helped to develop the proximity fuse detonator, a battlefield device that caused enemy missiles to explode prematurely, saving many soldiers' lives in World War II, died of cancer on Jan. 12. He resided in Flemington, N.J.
FEATURES
By Patricia Beach Smith and Patricia Beach Smith,McClatchy News Service | October 3, 1993
Mary Emmerling is "hot," if you can call anyone as cool as she is "hot.""Yeah, I have just been discovered," she says. "I am like those actors who have been working for decades and someone finally discovers them. I wrote 'American Country West' 10 years ago, and people are just beginning to learn about it. That's OK. I couldn't be luckier. After all, I have the New York Times and Lexington Furniture behind me now."The New York Times is publishing Ms. Emmerling's latest endeavor, a charming magazine called Mary Emmerling's Country, the first issue of which is now on newsstands.
NEWS
August 20, 1993
PRESIDENT Bill Clinton celebrated his 47th birthday yesterday. He is the third person to turn that age while president.The first was Ulysses S. Grant. He was born April 27, 1822. He was 46 when he took office on March 4, 1869, and became 47 seven weeks later. The second president to turn 47 in the White House was Theodore Roosevelt. TR was born Oct. 27, 1858. He became president upon the death of William McKinley on March 13, 1901. So he celebrated his 43rd, 44th, 45th and 46th birthdays while president.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 28, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 26th was held in 1888, by which time the tariff had become the dominant issue.President Cleveland and the Democrats wanted to revise it down. The Republicans, the party of businessmen who wanted the price of foreign products kept high, opposed this.An innovation of this campaign was the use of private Republican clubs organized by industrialists to finance the campaign.The Republicans nominated Indiana Sen. Benjamin Harrison, a war hero and grandson of President William Henry Harrison.
NEWS
July 20, 2005
Benjamin Franklin Harrison, a retired electronics technician and amateur radio operator, died of colon cancer July 13 at Harmony Hall nursing home in Columbia. He was 83. Mr. Harrison was born in Bethany, Mo., and as a teenager moved to Kansas City, Mo., where he studied electronics at a technical school. He enlisted in the Navy in 1941 and served as an electronics technician in Washington and in the Pacific. Discharged from the Navy in 1945, Mr. Harrison re-enlisted the next year. He was an aviation electronics technician and had attained the rank of chief petty officer.
SPORTS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | January 13, 2007
INDIANAPOLIS -- The man Baltimore still loves to hate is buried on the side of the highest hill in Indianapolis -- a rolling green slope that once inspired poetry -- beneath a 6-foot, sculpted gray granite monument that bears a large horseshoe logo and his last name in capital letters: IRSAY. While closure has eluded many Baltimore fans who still hold a grudge against the man who spirited the Colts away to Indianapolis, it came for Robert Irsay on Jan. 14, 1997, at the age of 73, two years after he suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed and unable to speak in more than a whisper.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 12, 1991
SEAFORD, Del. -- The last lesson Victoria L. Eastburn learned in high school was "what a president of the United States can do for somebody" when he attends their graduation exercises as George Bush did here yesterday:* He can turn valedictorians like Ms. Eastburn and classmate William T. Gibbs into local celebrities with days of attention from radio, television and newspaper reporters eager for angles on a presidential visit.* He can mention the two in his commencement speech, citing them as examples of how "family, faith and determination" can help high school dropouts overcome years of obstacles and mountains of hardship to obtain their degrees in night school.
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