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NEWS
September 30, 1994
The latest Armenian tragedy, a mudslide, may seem as remote as Armenia's six-year war with Azerbaijan. But Armenia is defined by Christianity (which it was the first nation to adopt), its unique alphabet (invented to strengthen the religion), and art created as religious devotion.The greatest exhibition of Armenian Christian art ever shown in America is currently at the Walters Art Gallery. It consists of 89 illuminated manuscripts, mostly of the Gospels, from 30 collections, produced over the centuries.
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NEWS
By Michael L. Buckler | January 30, 2011
The Peace Corps has endured a rough month. On Jan. 18, the Corps lost Sargent Shriver, its charismatic architect and first leader. The previous Friday, ABC News ran a grizzly story on violence against Peace Corps volunteers — Jess Smochek was gang-raped in Bangladesh in 2004; Kate Puzey was murdered in Benin in 2009. This raises the question: Has Mr. Shriver's Peace Corps become too dangerous for volunteers? There's no question that in male-dominated, developing countries, the Peace Corps experience is often more harrowing for women than men. Approximately 0.5 percent of female volunteers become rape victims in the Peace Corps (during the two-year service commitment)
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 1991
PORTO NOVO, Benin -- Anxious voters lined up before dawn yesterday morning in front of polling stations here and across Benin to cast ballots in this tiny nation's first free presidential elections in nearly three decades.The head of the republic's election commission said last night that no official results would be reported until tomorrow.According to unofficial reports, the turnout among the 2 million eligible voters was high, as much as 80 percent in some places. Altogether, there are about 4 million people in this country, which about the size of Kentucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 17, 2007
As a performer, Angelique Kidjo is too free-spirited for the recording studio. She likens it to jail. So during the making of her latest album, the sparkling Djin Djin, the world-fusion artist worked closely with producer Tony Visconti to capture the vibrancy and spontaneity of her stage shows. "The recording studio, it's too fake for me," says Kidjo, who headlines Lisner Auditorium in Washington tonight. "I come from a live background, you know. You're out there, and you're performing, and you record as you go along.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 4, 1994
Most of the art of Africa before this century has been lost because of its fragile materials, such as wood and textiles. But from the West African kingdom of Benin comes one of the world's great treasures: bronze sculptures that date back as far as the 14th century. They record a highly centralized culture in which artists were so prized that they acted as the king's advisers on matters of state.Benin, says Baltimore Museum of Art curator Frederick Lamp, was "one of the most powerful and proud civilizations of Africa.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
They shake and shimmy and shake some more -- showing off their moves, calling on their past and giving the audience a piece of the place they call home."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1994
Judging by the art in "Benin: Royal Art of Africa," at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the west African kingdom of Benin was a rich and complex royal society for 500 years before it was conquered by the British in 1897. Under the oba, a king regarded as a godlike figure, were strata of chieftains, dignitaries and organized guilds of artists including metal workers and wood and ivory carvers.The artists were valued members of society, and judging by the works in this show their skill was extraordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 17, 2007
As a performer, Angelique Kidjo is too free-spirited for the recording studio. She likens it to jail. So during the making of her latest album, the sparkling Djin Djin, the world-fusion artist worked closely with producer Tony Visconti to capture the vibrancy and spontaneity of her stage shows. "The recording studio, it's too fake for me," says Kidjo, who headlines Lisner Auditorium in Washington tonight. "I come from a live background, you know. You're out there, and you're performing, and you record as you go along.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson | September 12, 1990
Joe Moss strolls down the driveway from his 1840s farm home in Newark, Del., to check for letters -- at his mailbox in Cecil County, Md.When Jeanne Benin arrives home from work she enters her driveway through Delaware. Next morning she leaves through the Pennsylvania end. "It's easier to get the mail and make the corner that way," she said.Before his 18th-century farmhouse became the office for his family's mobile home park, Randolph Merchant, 68, used to sleep in Bethel Township, Pa., and then join the rest of the family for breakfast in Newcastle County, Del.-- without going outdoors.
NEWS
May 8, 2001
ON A DAILY BASIS, newspapers around the world have been carrying items about a ship, refused entry by various African ports, that was believed to carry 200 young slaves. Confusion reigned even after the ship was allowed to dock. There were only a few dozen children on board. Had the captain thrown the others overboard, eliminating the evidence of his crimes? That isn't outside the realm of possibility, say those familiar with global trafficking of humans. Today, evidence of this vile trade is seen in parts of Africa, Asia and the Middle East -- but also in the United States.
NEWS
May 8, 2001
ON A DAILY BASIS, newspapers around the world have been carrying items about a ship, refused entry by various African ports, that was believed to carry 200 young slaves. Confusion reigned even after the ship was allowed to dock. There were only a few dozen children on board. Had the captain thrown the others overboard, eliminating the evidence of his crimes? That isn't outside the realm of possibility, say those familiar with global trafficking of humans. Today, evidence of this vile trade is seen in parts of Africa, Asia and the Middle East -- but also in the United States.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1999
The origins of Leon D. Holsey's passion for Africa are not entirely clear. Maybe it came from the stories he heard from his grandmother about her mother's slave-ship trip through the middle passage; perhaps from the uncle who was involved in Marcus Garvey's back-to-Africa movement; or from his own travels in the merchant marine that first landed him on that continent in 1946.Wherever it came from, the land once disparaged by some as the Dark Continent became a bright light for Holsey, a beacon that shone on generations of students as it guided him through a life of teaching and spiritual exploration.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
They shake and shimmy and shake some more -- showing off their moves, calling on their past and giving the audience a piece of the place they call home."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Second-grader Rachel Whitaker's short story about her friend getting lost and later found was inspired by both an African proverb and author Jane Cowen-Fletcher's second children's book, "It Takes A Village.""I like the book. It does take a village to raise a child," Rachel said as though she were older than just her seven years.Rachel met the Maine-based storyteller when Mrs. Cowen-Fletcher visited Phelps Luck Elementary School last week to read to the students, talk to them about writing books and critique their short stories.
NEWS
September 30, 1994
The latest Armenian tragedy, a mudslide, may seem as remote as Armenia's six-year war with Azerbaijan. But Armenia is defined by Christianity (which it was the first nation to adopt), its unique alphabet (invented to strengthen the religion), and art created as religious devotion.The greatest exhibition of Armenian Christian art ever shown in America is currently at the Walters Art Gallery. It consists of 89 illuminated manuscripts, mostly of the Gospels, from 30 collections, produced over the centuries.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1994
Judging by the art in "Benin: Royal Art of Africa," at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the west African kingdom of Benin was a rich and complex royal society for 500 years before it was conquered by the British in 1897. Under the oba, a king regarded as a godlike figure, were strata of chieftains, dignitaries and organized guilds of artists including metal workers and wood and ivory carvers.The artists were valued members of society, and judging by the works in this show their skill was extraordinary.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Second-grader Rachel Whitaker's short story about her friend getting lost and later found was inspired by both an African proverb and author Jane Cowen-Fletcher's second children's book, "It Takes A Village.""I like the book. It does take a village to raise a child," Rachel said as though she were older than just her seven years.Rachel met the Maine-based storyteller when Mrs. Cowen-Fletcher visited Phelps Luck Elementary School last week to read to the students, talk to them about writing books and critique their short stories.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1999
The origins of Leon D. Holsey's passion for Africa are not entirely clear. Maybe it came from the stories he heard from his grandmother about her mother's slave-ship trip through the middle passage; perhaps from the uncle who was involved in Marcus Garvey's back-to-Africa movement; or from his own travels in the merchant marine that first landed him on that continent in 1946.Wherever it came from, the land once disparaged by some as the Dark Continent became a bright light for Holsey, a beacon that shone on generations of students as it guided him through a life of teaching and spiritual exploration.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 4, 1994
Most of the art of Africa before this century has been lost because of its fragile materials, such as wood and textiles. But from the West African kingdom of Benin comes one of the world's great treasures: bronze sculptures that date back as far as the 14th century. They record a highly centralized culture in which artists were so prized that they acted as the king's advisers on matters of state.Benin, says Baltimore Museum of Art curator Frederick Lamp, was "one of the most powerful and proud civilizations of Africa.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 1991
PORTO NOVO, Benin -- Anxious voters lined up before dawn yesterday morning in front of polling stations here and across Benin to cast ballots in this tiny nation's first free presidential elections in nearly three decades.The head of the republic's election commission said last night that no official results would be reported until tomorrow.According to unofficial reports, the turnout among the 2 million eligible voters was high, as much as 80 percent in some places. Altogether, there are about 4 million people in this country, which about the size of Kentucky.
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