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By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | August 19, 1991
ChicagoA newborn baby with its umbilical cord still attached, a priest and a nun kissing, an angelic-looking white child hugging a black child with a semblance of horns, leaves floating in a sea of oil, a zebra and a parrot, and a roll of white toilet paper are the six images that form Benetton's fall advertising campaign.Forget about the leaves, the zebra with the parrot and even the toilet paper for the time being. It's the baby and those cute kids that are bringing the bags of mail to Benetton's headquarters and causing its 800 number to go bonkers.
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By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
As Dr. Joanne Wilson emerged from her San Juan hotel last month, she spied a young woman striding toward her in a dusty pink T-shirt emblazoned with the words "United Colors of Benetton." Just like that, the tropical beauty around the doctor faded, and she found herself transported back 13 years. The ocean, the sun, the sand, all of it was replaced by the vision of a dingy convenience store in Raleigh, N.C., and the crumpled body of her 33-year-old baby brother. As anyone in grief knows, there's no way to tell what associations will spark new spasms of sorrow.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
Outraged by Benetton's new advertising campaign that features interviews with convicted killers, Sears, Roebuck and Co. stores in Maryland removed Benetton USA apparel from their floors yesterday, in compliance with a corporate protest against the clothing company. Most stores nationwide were able to comply with the companywide order to remove the clothing before stores opened yesterday, according to a spokeswoman for Sears, the second-largest U.S. retailer. The decision to remove the brand, which Sears has sold exclusively since last fall, came after Benetton officials refused to pull the "We, on death row," advertising campaign, said Peggy Palter, a spokeswoman for Sears.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
Outraged by Benetton's new advertising campaign that features interviews with convicted killers, Sears, Roebuck and Co. stores in Maryland removed Benetton USA apparel from their floors yesterday, in compliance with a corporate protest against the clothing company. Most stores nationwide were able to comply with the companywide order to remove the clothing before stores opened yesterday, according to a spokeswoman for Sears, the second-largest U.S. retailer. The decision to remove the brand, which Sears has sold exclusively since last fall, came after Benetton officials refused to pull the "We, on death row," advertising campaign, said Peggy Palter, a spokeswoman for Sears.
FEATURES
By Loretta Grantham and Loretta Grantham,Cox News Service | August 21, 1991
The very fact that you're reading this proves controversial fashion ads work.This is publicity. And that's what such ads do best -- get free press and get folks talking.You may not recall the specifics of a shocking ad 10 years from now, but you'll probably remember the name behind it: Benetton, Calvin Klein or Obsession. . . .Fervor is focusing now on Benetton's fall/winter campaign, which includes six ads.Under scrutiny are three: One shows a newborn baby, umbilical cord still attached; another depicts a nun and priest kissing; and the third features two children -- a white girl with a black boy whose hair is formed into devil-like horns.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1995
Airlines slash summer faresAmerica West Airlines Inc. cut summer air fares yesterday, a move that USAir Group Inc. and Northwest Airlines Inc. quickly matched.The carriers are slashing fares for some summer travel as much as 40 percent on tickets bought before July 12. USAir, the largest carrier at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, later offered discounts of up to 40 percent on fares in the United States, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean.IBM stock passes $100 markInternational Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1992
Merger pleases AT&T and NCRThe chief executives of AT&T and NCR said yesterday that the two companies' $7.5 billion merger a year ago this month had been successful and that AT&T's computer operations, troubled in the 1980s, would be profitable in 1992.Robert E. Allen, chairman and chief executive of American Telephone and Telegraph Co., said at a news conference, however, that because the company's computer business now comprises NCR, AT&T's old computer operations and the recently acquired Teradata, comparing this year's financial performance with last year's was mixing "apples, oranges and ++ peaches."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 4, 1994
We do indeed live in a global village, trading cultural ideas as well as fashionable trinkets quicker than you can spell Benetton.Dreadlocks, the matted hair of Jamaica's Rastafarian believers, are weaving their way into mainstream America. Slowly, to be sure. Rockers jumped on the dread wagon fairly recently -- anything to stand out in MTV's endless trendiness. The young club set is following suit, and before we know it glimmers of Kingston style will start raising eyebrows at the country club.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | January 23, 1991
Joel Smeyne's daughters bought sweaters from Benetton i Europe long before their father had ever heard of the Italian company.Now Smeyne owns two Benetton stores, but he is struggling to keep just one open. He has decided to close his Security Square Mall store within a month.Benetton stores are independently owned by retailers who are licensed to sell the imported sportswear. Other stores in the area are not affected by Smeyne's decision.L Smeyne is hoping to keep open his store in White Marsh Mall.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 6, 1993
David Bowie has always had a weakness for arresting imagery. Of course, that probably seems obvious to his fans; how else could Bowie have come up with such visually striking creations as Ziggy Stardust or the Thin White Duke if he didn't know a thing or two about presentation and design?But few things catch the singer's eye as dependably as Benetton ads do. "Have you heard about the new campaign where they've taken famous personalities and changed the color of their skin?" he asks over the phone from Britain.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1995
Airlines slash summer faresAmerica West Airlines Inc. cut summer air fares yesterday, a move that USAir Group Inc. and Northwest Airlines Inc. quickly matched.The carriers are slashing fares for some summer travel as much as 40 percent on tickets bought before July 12. USAir, the largest carrier at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, later offered discounts of up to 40 percent on fares in the United States, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean.IBM stock passes $100 markInternational Business Machines Corp.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 4, 1994
We do indeed live in a global village, trading cultural ideas as well as fashionable trinkets quicker than you can spell Benetton.Dreadlocks, the matted hair of Jamaica's Rastafarian believers, are weaving their way into mainstream America. Slowly, to be sure. Rockers jumped on the dread wagon fairly recently -- anything to stand out in MTV's endless trendiness. The young club set is following suit, and before we know it glimmers of Kingston style will start raising eyebrows at the country club.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 6, 1993
David Bowie has always had a weakness for arresting imagery. Of course, that probably seems obvious to his fans; how else could Bowie have come up with such visually striking creations as Ziggy Stardust or the Thin White Duke if he didn't know a thing or two about presentation and design?But few things catch the singer's eye as dependably as Benetton ads do. "Have you heard about the new campaign where they've taken famous personalities and changed the color of their skin?" he asks over the phone from Britain.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1992
Merger pleases AT&T and NCRThe chief executives of AT&T and NCR said yesterday that the two companies' $7.5 billion merger a year ago this month had been successful and that AT&T's computer operations, troubled in the 1980s, would be profitable in 1992.Robert E. Allen, chairman and chief executive of American Telephone and Telegraph Co., said at a news conference, however, that because the company's computer business now comprises NCR, AT&T's old computer operations and the recently acquired Teradata, comparing this year's financial performance with last year's was mixing "apples, oranges and ++ peaches."
FEATURES
By Loretta Grantham and Loretta Grantham,Cox News Service | August 21, 1991
The very fact that you're reading this proves controversial fashion ads work.This is publicity. And that's what such ads do best -- get free press and get folks talking.You may not recall the specifics of a shocking ad 10 years from now, but you'll probably remember the name behind it: Benetton, Calvin Klein or Obsession. . . .Fervor is focusing now on Benetton's fall/winter campaign, which includes six ads.Under scrutiny are three: One shows a newborn baby, umbilical cord still attached; another depicts a nun and priest kissing; and the third features two children -- a white girl with a black boy whose hair is formed into devil-like horns.
FEATURES
By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | August 19, 1991
ChicagoA newborn baby with its umbilical cord still attached, a priest and a nun kissing, an angelic-looking white child hugging a black child with a semblance of horns, leaves floating in a sea of oil, a zebra and a parrot, and a roll of white toilet paper are the six images that form Benetton's fall advertising campaign.Forget about the leaves, the zebra with the parrot and even the toilet paper for the time being. It's the baby and those cute kids that are bringing the bags of mail to Benetton's headquarters and causing its 800 number to go bonkers.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
As Dr. Joanne Wilson emerged from her San Juan hotel last month, she spied a young woman striding toward her in a dusty pink T-shirt emblazoned with the words "United Colors of Benetton." Just like that, the tropical beauty around the doctor faded, and she found herself transported back 13 years. The ocean, the sun, the sand, all of it was replaced by the vision of a dingy convenience store in Raleigh, N.C., and the crumpled body of her 33-year-old baby brother. As anyone in grief knows, there's no way to tell what associations will spark new spasms of sorrow.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 19, 1998
EL FOYEL, Argentina -- British-born billionaire Joe Lewis isn't building his new home in either of the two snow-capped mountain chains that run through his Patagonian ranch.He didn't choose the spot by the 270-foot waterfall, or the crystal river filled with trout that crashes through a deep gorge, or the deep, silent stand of virgin cypress forest.Instead, his mammoth new stone mansion, with its guest house and tile-roofed stable, sits at the foot of Lago Escondido -- Hidden Lake -- a mirror-smooth jewel that is the double of Lake Louise in Canada's stunning Banff National Park.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | January 23, 1991
Joel Smeyne's daughters bought sweaters from Benetton i Europe long before their father had ever heard of the Italian company.Now Smeyne owns two Benetton stores, but he is struggling to keep just one open. He has decided to close his Security Square Mall store within a month.Benetton stores are independently owned by retailers who are licensed to sell the imported sportswear. Other stores in the area are not affected by Smeyne's decision.L Smeyne is hoping to keep open his store in White Marsh Mall.
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