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June 16, 2011
Support the Steppingstone Museum in Havre de Grace by enjoying a Euro-California style buffet and blues music. Johnny Ciao, a celebrity chef, will be coming to Harford County on June 23 to host a Blues Buffet at Bellissimo Restaurant to benefit Steppingstone. Joining him will be blues band Professor Louie and the Crowmatix. Tickets are $50 and the dinner starts at 7 p.m. For the benefit, Ciao will purchase all of his own ingredients and essentially take over Bellissimo's kitchen to cook the buffet.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan denounced Democrat Anthony G. Brown's handling of Maryland's health exchange Monday during their second televised debate, calling the website a "complete disaster. " Brown refused to give in, acknowledging that the launch went poorly but pointing to 400,000 Marylanders who obtained health coverage and statistics showing a drop in uncompensated care at Maryland hospitals. He said the state has become one of the most competitive markets in the country. "We rolled up our sleeves and got it done," Brown said of the state's efforts to correct the website's problems.
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NEWS
October 10, 2012
As an former Catonsville resident living overseas, I've experienced the advantages of having a national health care program. Five years ago I got a liver transplant here, making me a real-life German (liver)-American (heart). All my medical costs were covered by my German public health insurance policy. Everyone gets sick at some time in their life, which is why everyone will need health care sooner or later. When everyone pays in to such a health insurance plan, costs will come down and everyone will benefit.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
On Oct. 11, the Ottobar will host a benefit event for staff member Tom Malenski, who died last Friday after being stabbed near the Remington music venue following a punk-rock concert. Details surrounding the benefit event are not currently available, but the Ottobar has set up a page for donations to the Malenski family. To make a donation or for more information, visit this MissionTix page . There is also a GoFundMe page accepting donations to help with funeral costs.
NEWS
March 11, 2011
Allowing children of undocumented immigrants to attend universities as in-state residents is logical ( "A flawed compromise," March 8). All involved are participating members of society and will ultimately make Maryland look good. When we read that U.S. schools are slipping in the global arena, imagine having bilingual youth moving up to assume responsibilities that will lift up the whole nation. I often hear Americans say we are only as strong as our weakest link. Well, here is a chance to remedy that.
NEWS
November 22, 2012
Baltimore and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake are to be commended for the revisions to the city's zoning code ("Transforming Baltimore," Nov. 16). The new, simpler code is a departure from the Euclidean zoning (named for a landmark Supreme Court zoning decision) that Baltimore had for 80 years and will better reflect market realities. The new waterfront, maritime, transit, transportation, hospital and campus districts recognize the unique physical and design characteristics of these areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
Over on the Unleashed blog, Jill Rosen has the information about a dining out benefit for Baltimore Barcs, which cares for the city's homeless animals. Pierpoint is Tuesday's participating restaurant, donating ten percent check of checks from diners who make a reservation under BARCS. The week's remaining participants are MaGerk's in Federal Hill on Wednesday, Miguel's Cocina y Cantina in Locust Point on Thursday and 30 East at the Stalking Horse in Federal Hill on Friday.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 18, 2012
The Carroll Hospital Center Foundation said it has received $5 million towards a an effort to raise $22 million to benefit medical services. The Taneytown-based Kahlert Foundation donated the money to be used to support improvement efforts at  Carroll Hospital Center and Carroll Hospice. It is the first multi-million dollar gift the hospital has received in its 50-year history. The fundraising effort, “Campaign to Cure & Comfort, Always,” will support five key areas: the cancer center, a community education and wellness center, emerging technology, endowment funds and cardiovascular and stroke prevention and treatment.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 24, 2012
Social Security Administration will resume paper statements of estimated benefits to certain workers age 60 and up beginning next month, according to a letter from the agency's commissioner released this morning by two senators. In the letter dated Jan. 20, Social Security CommissionerMichael J. Astruesaid the agency will begin mailing paper statements to workers 60 and older next month. Additionally, workers at age 25 will receive a first-time paper statement by the end of this year that is accompanied by an explanation of the program.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 19, 2011
After two consecutive years of no cost-of-living increase, Social Security beneficiaries will receive a 3.6 percent raise next year. That will effect nearly 55 million Social Security beneficiaries starting in January. The increase in benefits is tied to the inflation rate for the third quarter, compared with the third quarter of 2008 - the last time an increase was announced. Back then, gas prices shot up temporarily, and beneficiaries recieved a 5.8 percent increase in 2009.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
The majority of Maryland public schools are slated to start the week of Aug. 25 after this year's summer break. While I was on the Baltimore City school board, whenever I spoke with families regarding the opening day of school the question invariably arose: "Why does school start a week before Labor Day?" A changed start date for school shouldn't be mandated by the state. But local jurisdictions should certainly seek input from students, parents, teachers and stakeholders for feedback on district school calendars.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Musicians will sing and strum and play the harmonica Thursday night in Annapolis night to raise funds - and awareness - for Lyme disease. Headlining the Ticked Off Music Fest will be Les Stroud, a TV survivalist and musician from Canada. He'll be joined by two musicians who survived Lyme disease and a lawyer-singer-songwriter from Annapolis. "My hope is to bring awareness to Anne Arundel County about the dangers of tick-borne diseases," said Karen Owen, a fitness instructor and mother from the Broadneck community who is organizing the concert.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
State Del. Pat McDonough has asked the Maryland State Prosecutor's Office to investigate whether the Baltimore County school board acted properly when it gave the superintendent an increase in his pay and benefits package of $27,000. McDonough believes Superintendent Dallas Dance's contract prohibits the board from giving the superintendent an increase in compensation that is larger than the teachers'. The board gave Dance a $5,000 raise as well as a $18,200 reimbursement for his contribution into the Maryland state retirement system and a larger payout for unused vacation days.
NEWS
By Robert P. Giloth and Maureen Conway | August 14, 2014
Last month's enactment of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), so long in the making, is a milestone. It makes important updates to our workforce training system and demonstrates national support for the expanded use of sector strategies that forge training partnerships between employers, nonprofits, foundations and public agencies. But WIOA is still just a first step in addressing the problem of connecting people to jobs. We need to build on it to establish a true and equitable apprenticeship system in the United States.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Gilchrist Hospice Care, the largest provider of hospice services in the state, said Wednesday it has partnered with Joseph Richey Hospice, which operates the only free-standing residential facility in Baltimore City. Details of the arrangement were not disclosed by the two non-profits, but officials said Joseph Richey will now fall under the Gilchrist umbrella. Joseph Richey provides care to terminally ill patients in underserved communities, and Gilchrist's leadership expected the partnership to enhance care.
NEWS
By Charly Carter | August 7, 2014
Diners rejoice! Baltimore City is celebrating its summer Restaurant Week through Aug. 10, and Baltimore County restaurants kick off their celebration Friday. The events offer a great way to discover new places and fresh tastes or revisit old favorites at a discount. But while you're enjoying your meal, consider the servers and restaurant staff who make the dining experience. During the last Maryland General Assembly session, workers who rely on tips for salary were dealt a harsh blow when legislators permanently froze their pay at $3.63 per hour.
NEWS
By Elizabeth J. Kennedy | March 7, 2011
As the campaign to strip public employees of their collective bargaining rights advances across the Midwest, taxpayers — whom the abolishment of such rights is alleged to benefit — deserve a complete accounting of what they also stand to lose. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has characterized public sector workers as the "haves" to the private sector's "have nots. " This should strike all but the most removed from working people as absurd. Since when have teachers, social workers, nurses, cops, firefighters and sanitation workers been the "haves" of the American economy?
NEWS
By DANIEL DYER | April 2, 1991
The aqueduct took a year to complete. From the cool mountains in the North it traveled 1,000 miles, transporting life-sustaining water to the sweltering South. Every 100 yards, gargoyle spouts permitted people to draw sustenance from this river of life. It was an engineering marvel.But all was not well. On the day of completion, no water ran in the aqueduct, and the people in the South were dismayed. Would relief never come?A courier arrived with grim news: War had broken out in the North.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 4, 2014
Let us now praise Democratic hypocrisy. Throughout my life, various Republicans have suggested amending the Constitution in one way or another. A few years ago, they suggested revising the 14th Amendment to get rid of automatic birthright citizenship. Before that, some proposed amending the Constitution to lock in the traditional definition of marriage. Ronald Reagan wanted a presidential line-item veto added to the Constitution. On nearly every occasion, Democrats opposed such efforts, not just on the merits but on the puffed-up principle that we mustn't "tinker" or "tamper" with the genius of the Founding Fathers' constitutional design.
HEALTH
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
At Cathy Rees' yoga class, you won't see anyone attempt a downward-facing dog — many participants are in wheelchairs, and almost all of them suffer from dementia. Instead, Rees has adapted the principles of yoga, which aims to align the body's seven chakras, or points of energy, to the abilities of the residents of Copper Ridge, a center for dementia care in Sykesville. Her yoga class, now in its fourth month, is an experiment of sorts. A handful of studies have suggested that yoga can be used to improve the overall physical and mental well-being of dementia patients, so Rees wants to craft a dementia-specific yoga program that can be studied and refined by researchers.
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