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BUSINESS
August 10, 1997
Long & Foster is continuing its quest for more market share in the Baltimore area by acquiring Beneficial Plus Realty Inc. of Rosedale.The merger is the sixth announced by the Virginia-based company in 1997.This year, Long & Foster also acquired Porter & Associates in Salisbury, BGS&G in Cumberland, Vision One Real Estate in Columbia, and two Pennsylvania firms.The 29 sales associates of Beneficial Plus will join Long & Foster, along with Charney Harris, the broker owner of the 10-year-old firm.
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NEWS
July 8, 2014
The tentative contract reached early Tuesday between Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union representing about 2,000 of its service workers represents a victory not only for the hospital and members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East but for Baltimore. The contract raises wages, in some case dramatically so, allowing Hopkins to set an example of what a "living wage" can mean for the health and security of workers in this city. It was a hard-fought effort that included a three-day strike in April and, more recently, intervention by Gov. Martin O'Malley to avert another such action.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 8, 1998
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Household International Inc., the nation's second largest consumer lender, agreed yesterday to buy Beneficial Corp. for about $8.25 billion in stock as mergers sweep the finance business.Household, based in Prospect Heights, Ill., will pay 1.0222 shares, or $143.87, for each Beneficial share. After the purchase, Household will have 30 million customers, $62 billion of receivables and more than 2,000 branches across the United States as well as in Britain, Ireland and Canada.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
I found an egg case when pruning my shrub. It has light brown "Styrofoam," like a praying mantis egg case, but it's narrow with a cross hatch down the back. Will this hatch caterpillars? In the spring, your egg mass will hatch cute baby Carolina praying mantises, our native species. (The bulkier egg masses commonly seen are from Chinese or European praying mantises.) The praying mantis is a deft predator whose strategy is to remain perfectly still until its prey - such as stink bugs - comes close and then pounce.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | December 9, 1991
How would you like your company to get big bang -- I mean really big bang -- for giving away bucks that aren't really its bucks?Confusing as that sounds, it gets worse before it gets better. The company I am referring to is a major Delaware-chartered financial institution. Its corporate offices are in New Jersey. And, by all rights, it is really a Maryland company, at least historically. It is the company that gives away the money it doesn't really have.Last week, the Hodson Trust gave away $2.6 million to four Maryland institutions of higher education.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1991
Hardly anything could be nicer than to pick up your mail and find a check for $1,554.82 -- not one of those that say "You may be a winner," but the kind you can actually put in the bank.With it you could pay off your creditors, take a vacation, get your tires rotated, join the health club. Possibilities abound.But there are a few catches. The check is a loan. By endorsing it, you agree to pay back the money at a 24 percent interest rate. In total, during the next 36 months, you will pay an additional $641.
NEWS
September 11, 2009
FINN M.W. CASPERSEN, 67 Financial executive and philanthropist Finn M.W. Caspersen, a former chief executive of the financial services firm Beneficial Corp., has died of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound. Rhode Island police found Mr. Caspersen's body Monday on the grounds of a golf club in Charlestown, R.I. Mr. Caspersen was a philanthropist and fundraiser who served as chairman and chief executive of Beneficial Corp. from 1976 to 1998. He was a major benefactor to hospitals, universities and Republican politicians.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 2, 1992
Leading economic indicators suggest a recovery beneficial to incumbents in time for the '94 midterm election.Q. How do you reduce the number of young black males in Baltimore in trouble with the law? A. Better schools, more jobs, less dope.If teachers are striking, autumn cannot be far behind.The nutty hostility at the Republican National Convention was a bonanza for Democratic fund-raising. It is a little-known fact of political zoology that not all fat cats are male.
BUSINESS
By Insider Trading is written by CDA/Investnet of Fort Lauderdale, Fla | December 8, 1997
Below are insider transactions of 1,000 shares or more for publicly held companies based in Maryland or having substantial operations here. Insiders are officers, directors or owners of 10 percent or more of a corporation's stock.Columbia Bancorp.John M. Bond, officer, exercised an option for 10,000 shares of common at $9.09 each Oct. 29. To cover expenses of the transaction, Bond turned in 5,653 of them for $29.25 each Oct. 29 and now directly and indirectly holds 37,871 common.Robert W. Locke,vice president, exercised an option for 3,300 shares of common at $9.09 each Oct. 9 and now indirectly holds 1,485 common.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | March 26, 2006
Imagine a time when tobacco could be used to cure cancer rather than cause it. Or when it could be used to manufacture items such as shampoo, body lotion, hair conditioner and lipstick. Or as a source of ethanol to fuel automobiles, or as an ingredient in the production of household cleaners, paint and carpet. These possibilities are being pursued by researchers at the University of Maryland, College Park under a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The program provides about $300,000 a year for five years, and maybe longer, depending on the progress of the research.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
The contract agreement Baltimore has reached with city firefighters is an example of the good that can come out of difficult negotiations when both sides are willing to make concessions. Neither the city nor the firefighters got everything they wanted, but they were able to strike a deal that allowed both of them to come out ahead. Compromise, it turns out, need not always be a dirty word. Under the agreement, the firefighters will get a 16.5 percent pay raise over the next three years in exchange for accepting a longer workweek, which will increase from 42 to 47.5 hours.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | August 1, 2012
The absence of tight end Dennis Pitta because of a broken bone in his right hand has meant more reps in Ravens training camp for Ed Dickson. “I'm taking a lot of reps, but it's going to get me in better shape,” he said after Wednesday's session at the team's training facility in Owings Mills before acknowledging that he is a bit more tired at the end of practice. “I'm OK with it. During [the] two-minute [drill] today, I took the whole thing and usually Dennis comes get me halfway.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Can I grow veggies in a fully screened-in garden? I want to eat tomatoes without stink bug spots. Growing vegetables in a screened garden may reduce light, but the biggest problem is the exclusion of pollinators and beneficial insects. Vegetable plants that require insects for cross-pollination, such as cucumber, muskmelon, squash, pumpkin and watermelon, will not produce crops without them. Of course, you could hand-pollinate the flowers if you have the time. An organic method of excluding insect pests in the veggie garden is the floating row cover, which you drape directly on the plants.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
The latest study on the health of the Chesapeake Bay has some encouraging news - offering signs that years of pollution-fighting efforts are having a positive effect. Now, it remains to be seen whether Congress is paying attention and can refrain from pulling the proverbial rug out from under the bay's cleanup campaign. First the good news. A new study released by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science has found that efforts by Maryland and other states to reduce the flow of fertilizer, animal waste and other pollutants into the Chesapeake Bay has had a positive effect on the oxygen-deprived "dead zones" of the bay. The largest such dead zone - near the Chesapeake's deep water channel - appears to have peaked in the 1980s and declined ever since, according to the study published this month.
NEWS
By Richard J. Magid | August 11, 2011
The next several years will see a flood tide of a new kind of retiree — the rollover retiree. Millions of baby boomers will be transitioning into retirement without the comfort of the old-fashioned monthly pension check, but rather with a lump sum rollover check from their employment 401(k) or 403(b) retirement account. Ready or not, each rollover retiree will start a new career as an investor. Most will not be ready. For the fortunate few who have been able to accumulate large retirement accounts, the transition to retiree investor is eased by the legions of financial planners, investment advisers, money managers, etc. who are ready — for a fee — to advise and shepherd these rollover retirees into the world of investing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
Samuel Alexander Young Jr., a retired insurance company manager and Korean War veteran, died March 19 of lung cancer at his Sykesville home. He was 82. The son of an insurance salesman and a homemaker, Mr. Young was born in Baltimore and raised on Norman Avenue. He was a 1946 Calvert Hall College High School graduate and served in the Army for four years during the Korean War. He attained the rank of sergeant. Mr. Young worked for Conoco Oil before going to work in 1969 for Home Beneficial Life Insurance Co., where he was staff manager until retiring in 1989.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
The Hodson Trust, set up 78 years ago to support four private colleges in Maryland, handed out its annual grants yesterday, $6.7 million going to the Johns Hopkins University, Hood College, St. John's College and Washington College.Hopkins, Hood and Washington each get $1.94 million, while St. John's receives $881,839, according to an enrollment-based formula written into the original agreement.Hood will spend this year's gift on construction of a science center. St. John's will put the money toward a technology endowment, the athletic program and faculty salaries.
NEWS
November 10, 2000
WITH DEMAND for workers soaring, United Way leaders know unemployed Marylanders must be at or below the employment ladder's bottom rung. This is particularly true in Howard County, where the unemployment rate has been under 2 percent. Everyone who wants a job has one -- or so it seems. What to do, then, with a 35-year-old man or woman with no work experience, little education and poor personal hygiene? United Way tackles the problem with a "work-force readiness" program that begins with modest goals: Make an appointment with the Department of Social Services.
NEWS
September 11, 2009
FINN M.W. CASPERSEN, 67 Financial executive and philanthropist Finn M.W. Caspersen, a former chief executive of the financial services firm Beneficial Corp., has died of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound. Rhode Island police found Mr. Caspersen's body Monday on the grounds of a golf club in Charlestown, R.I. Mr. Caspersen was a philanthropist and fundraiser who served as chairman and chief executive of Beneficial Corp. from 1976 to 1998. He was a major benefactor to hospitals, universities and Republican politicians.
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