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Benedict Xvi

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2005
VATICAN CITY - The regular rhythms of the Vatican began returning yesterday as Pope Benedict XVI held the traditional Wednesday papal audience, using the occasion to express what may become a central theme of his papacy: the Christian roots of Europe. Addressing thousands of pilgrims in St. Peter's Square, the new pontiff said he chose the name Benedict for several reasons, among them the role that St. Benedict of Norcia, the fifth-century founder of the Benedictine order of monks, had in spreading Christianity in Europe.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | March 19, 2013
For the first time in history, the Roman Catholic Church has a pope from the New World, but liberal American Catholics should not expect Pope Francis to stray far from the old theology. Some things are excitingly different about this new pontiff. On matters of birth control, abortion, homosexuality, celibate priests and the role of women in the church, however, he is no revolutionary. When Argentina's Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio stepped out on the Vatican balcony as the new pope on Wednesday evening, all he was required to do was wave and give a blessing.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | January 26, 2006
In the much-anticipated first encyclical of his pontificate, likely to be analyzed for clues to his vision for the church in the 21st century, Pope Benedict XVI yesterday focused on the conviction that he says lies at the heart of Christianity: God is love. "In a world where the name of God is sometimes associated with vengeance or even a duty of hatred and violence, this message is both timely and significant," Pope Benedict wrote in the letter to the bishops of the Roman Catholic Church.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Baltimore is a rather Catholic town; if you ever lived here you know that. I was born and raised an Irish Catholic in Baltimore; if you frequent this blog you may have known that. Baseball is the ultimate sport for bizarre connections to history. No sport does random statistics better than baseball. This morning's blog merges all of those concepts together rather seamlessly (or clumsily, that's your call). I must admit its ridiculousness made me laugh and shake my head a little bit. Baseball historian/statistician Bill Arnold passed this tidbit my way. And I had to share it with you. It combines Catholicism and baseball.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Amid familiar folk tales, lively polka music and heaping helpings of sauerbraten, much of the talk yesterday at the German-American Springfest in Towson was of the Bavarian priest who became Pope Benedict XVI last week. Americans of German descent, regardless of their faith, said yesterday that they take pride that Joseph Ratzinger is the first German to lead the Roman Catholic Church in about 1,000 years. "They say in heaven there's no beer," said Hans Steffen, the festival's wine master and entertainment director.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2008
Pope Benedict XVI comes to Washington this week a virtual stranger in the United States, home to the third-largest Catholic flock on the planet. But his itinerary, which includes stadium-sized Masses for tens of thousands of followers, will provide an opportunity to change his image as a dour disciplinarian. Three years into his papacy, the 80-year-old pope enjoys nowhere near the public affection, let alone the adoration, that made Pope John Paul II's visit to Baltimore in 1995 such a rapturous event for so many.
NEWS
By Steve Kloehn and Manya A. Brachear and Steve Kloehn and Manya A. Brachear,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 25, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Sunshine glinting off his golden vestments, Pope Benedict XVI summoned centuries of Catholic tradition yesterday, then asked hundreds of thousands of people gathered in St. Peter's Square to join him as he sets out on a new papacy. "Pray for me that I may learn to love the Lord more. ... Pray for me that I may learn to love his flock more and more," he said during his official Mass of investiture. "Pray for me that I may not flee for fear of the wolves." That remark struck a poignant note after a week of mixed reactions to the former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger's election as pope, including some sharply personal criticism.
NEWS
January 28, 2006
Pope Benedict XVI will not visit Baltimore for the rededication of the Basilica of the Assumption in November, but could make a stop here next year, a spokesman for the Archdiocese of Baltimore said yesterday. Spokesman Sean T. Caine said that Pope Benedict's schedule will not allow him to visit for the rededication of the nation's first Roman Catholic cathedral. But with the pope considering a visit to the United States in 2007, Cardinal William H. Keeler has asked him to consider a stop in Baltimore, Caine said.
NEWS
By Maria de Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella and Maria de Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella,Los Angeles Times | October 6, 2008
ROME - In the beginning, Pope Benedict XVI read these words: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the Earth." And the pope and millions of viewers watching him on Italian television last night saw that it was good. The pontiff launched a marathon reading of the Bible, from Genesis to Apocalypse, broadcast live on state television. It will last seven days and six nights. The roster of about 1,300 readers features former Italian presidents, current Cabinet ministers, soccer stars, foreign diplomats, cardinals, intellectuals, actors and opera singers, as well as ordinary citizens.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Baltimore is a rather Catholic town; if you ever lived here you know that. I was born and raised an Irish Catholic in Baltimore; if you frequent this blog you may have known that. Baseball is the ultimate sport for bizarre connections to history. No sport does random statistics better than baseball. This morning's blog merges all of those concepts together rather seamlessly (or clumsily, that's your call). I must admit its ridiculousness made me laugh and shake my head a little bit. Baseball historian/statistician Bill Arnold passed this tidbit my way. And I had to share it with you. It combines Catholicism and baseball.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Archbishop William E. Lori will celebrate a Mass of Thanksgiving next week for the papacy of Benedict XVI, the Archdiocese of Baltimore announced Friday. The Mass is planned for 5 p.m. Feb. 23 at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, spokesman Sean Caine said. It will be open to the public; tickets will not be required. Benedict, 85, said this week that he would step down at the end of the month after nearly eight years as spiritual leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics. He became the first pope to resign voluntarily since Clementine V in 1294.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 13, 2013
You have to wonder what kind of fun Vatican mystery writer Dan Brown would have with the startling resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. As would be the case when any well-known CEO suddenly steps down "for health reasons," we are immediately suspicious. Was he, like the last pope to step down voluntarily more than 700 years ago, simply the wrong man for the job? A shy and aging scholar overwhelmed by the demands of guiding the church through the scandals of sex abuse and money laundering, who was happier in the library than on the balcony at St. Peter's?
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | January 27, 2009
There was a striking parallel last week when two of the world's most famous leaders - Barack Obama and Pope Benedict XVI - unveiled new presences on the Internet. Minutes before Obama took the oath of office as the 44th U.S. president, his people pushed the button on a revamped, edgier Web site for whitehouse.gov. It came with video links, a blog and a home page so sleek and styled it could have come from an upscale retailer. Obama surrounded himself early on with people who grasped the Internet as a powerful communications tool, and it was immediately clear he planned to carry over his online strengths from his campaign to the office of the presidency.
NEWS
By Maria de Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella and Maria de Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella,Los Angeles Times | October 6, 2008
ROME - In the beginning, Pope Benedict XVI read these words: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the Earth." And the pope and millions of viewers watching him on Italian television last night saw that it was good. The pontiff launched a marathon reading of the Bible, from Genesis to Apocalypse, broadcast live on state television. It will last seven days and six nights. The roster of about 1,300 readers features former Italian presidents, current Cabinet ministers, soccer stars, foreign diplomats, cardinals, intellectuals, actors and opera singers, as well as ordinary citizens.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | April 16, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The challenges confronting the Catholic Church in America are many: an aging membership, a declining priesthood, a sex abuse scandal that has rattled faith in the hierarchy. Roughly one-third of Americans who were raised Catholic have left the church, and those who remain are as divided over its teachings on abortion, homosexuality and other issues as the population at large. Still, as Pope Benedict XVI makes his first papal visit to the United States, he will find a church in the midst of renewal.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun Reporter | April 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Pope Benedict XVI arrives in the United States this week amid a full-throttle presidential campaign, with Sens. Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and John McCain seeking support from the same engaged Catholics the pontiff hopes to reach. The pope won't directly weigh in on the presidential race during stops in Washington and New York, Vatican officials and theologians say. But his homilies and remarks will almost certainly refer to topics of intense debate here, from the Iraq war to abortion and gay marriage.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Archbishop William E. Lori will celebrate a Mass of Thanksgiving next week for the papacy of Benedict XVI, the Archdiocese of Baltimore announced Friday. The Mass is planned for 5 p.m. Feb. 23 at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, spokesman Sean Caine said. It will be open to the public; tickets will not be required. Benedict, 85, said this week that he would step down at the end of the month after nearly eight years as spiritual leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics. He became the first pope to resign voluntarily since Clementine V in 1294.
NEWS
June 13, 2005
Blast derails train traveling to Moscow from Chechnya MOSCOW - A bomb derailed a passenger train traveling from Chechnya to Moscow yesterday, injuring at least 15 people in what officials described as a terrorist attack. The bombing occurred after a relative lull in attacks in Russia, one suggesting that security officials were making progress against those behind a wave of terrorist acts, including the seizure of the school in Beslan in September that left more than 330 people dead. There were no immediate claims of responsibility for the bombing, but the timing and the target suggested a link to the war in Chechnya.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2008
Pope Benedict XVI comes to Washington this week a virtual stranger in the United States, home to the third-largest Catholic flock on the planet. But his itinerary, which includes stadium-sized Masses for tens of thousands of followers, will provide an opportunity to change his image as a dour disciplinarian. Three years into his papacy, the 80-year-old pope enjoys nowhere near the public affection, let alone the adoration, that made Pope John Paul II's visit to Baltimore in 1995 such a rapturous event for so many.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | September 17, 2006
VATICAN CITY -- With furor spreading throughout the Islamic world, Pope Benedict XVI expressed deep regret yesterday that a speech he gave at a German university last week had offended Muslims. In a statement released by his new secretary of state, Pope Benedict reiterated his "respect and esteem for those who profess Islam," adding that he hoped they will be "helped to understand the correct meaning of his words." It did not seem likely that the pope's expression of regret would satisfy the clamors from many corners of the world that he apologize.
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