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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 29, 1994
JACKSON, Wyo. -- With little public debate, the Federal Reserve Board is increasingly basing interest rate decisions on the controversial assumption that the nation's unemployment rate cannot be reduced much below 6 percent without igniting inflation.At an annual Federal Reserve conference on economic and labor policy held this weekend in Jackson Hole, Wyo., Fed officials privately acknowledged that they have come to rely on the 6 percent jobless figure as a key benchmark for setting interest rates.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
A surge of nearly 50,000 Marylanders obtained health coverage through the state's insurance exchange during the final two weeks of enrollment despite continued technical difficulties. The website, which allowed users to sign up for private plans and Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, had seen hundreds or a few thousand sign up each week before the final surge. More than 18,000 enrolled in private plans in the second half of March, officials announced Friday. "I would say we finished very strong," state Health Secretary Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein said, crediting volunteers and community health organizations for a final push.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
To better understand who visits Baltimore, the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association will spend more than $100,000 in the coming months on benchmarking studies that evaluate tourists and the services they receive here."
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on Tuesday announced an expansion of her signature urban revitalization program, Vacants to Value. The Baltimore Housing Department has set a goal of tearing down 1,500 vacant properties and renovating another 1,500 in the 36-month period that begins in January, Rawlings-Blake said. The Clinton Global Initiative designated the ambitious plan as one of its “Commitments to Action,” the mayor said at an event marking the two-year anniversary of Vacants to Value.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1996
Fast-growing Benchmark Communications is adding to its radio-station collection, agreeing to buy five more stations for $16.9 million, officials said yesterday, and coming close to cementing several other deals.In two separate transactions, Benchmark agreed to buy four urban-format stations in Jackson, Miss., for $15 million, and a country station in Shreveport, La., for $1.9 million.Once a cable-TV operator, Benchmark since 1991 has seized on federal radio deregulation by assembling a portfolio of 32 stations in nine markets, counting the Jackson and Shreveport properties.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Benchmark Communications of Baltimore yesterday closed a deal to buy its sixth radio station in two weeks, agreeing to pay $4.1 million for WSCQ-FM in Columbia, S.C.The adult standards station will be Benchmark's fifth property in that market.Benchmark, like most radio companies, has been on a buying binge since the new telecommunications law dropped limits on how many stations a single company can own and loosened rules on how many stations a single player can own in one market.This month, Benchmark said it would pay nearly $15 million for four stations in Jackson, Miss.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
Baltimore-based radio company Benchmark Communications will announce today that it has agreed to be acquired by a Dallas merchant banking group for $173 million.Benchmark's 32 radio stations throughout the Southeast will be sold to Capstar Broadcasting Partners, a holding company set up by the investment firm Hicks, Muse, Tate & Furst, Benchmark general partner Bruce R. Spector said yesterday.Benchmark owns two stations in Maryland, both in Salisbury: country station WWFG-FM and modern rock outlet WOSC-FM.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1996
Benchmark Communications of Baltimore will announce today that it has agreed to buy two radio stations in Alabama's capital city, bringing to 34 the number of stations the fast-growing local group either owns or has a contract to buy.The local company will buy WZHT-FM and WMCZ-FM, both in Montgomery, Ala., from a group of Mississippi-based investors, Benchmark general partner Bruce Spector said. Both stations use an urban music format, performed mostly by black artists and targeted to a mostly black audience.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
The Benchmark Co. of Baltimore has dropped its plans for The Pavilions shopping center at Route 31 and Fenby Farm Road.Robert Fox, Benchmark owner, said he is tired of fighting city hall and the politics involved in trying to put in the center.The firm's proposal for a 128,000-square-foot shopping center wasunanimously killed by the Westminster City Council last September after more than 200 citizens spoke out against it at a public hearing.Although the council said it might consider a smaller shopping plaza, Fox said he was unable to scale down plans for The Pavilions and still have it profitable.
NEWS
May 7, 1994
The Yield on the benchmark 30-year Treasury bond, which has been creeping up since the Federal Reserve first raised interest rates this year on Feb. 4, leapt to a 16-month closing high yesterday as the strong jobs report sparked inflation fears (Article, 16c).
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
However Baltimore's plain-spoken police commissioner is remembered, when he departs on the first day of August, he will leave his successor a challenging target. The number 200. That is the standard by whichFrederick H. Bealefeld III's successor will be measured. Under his watch, Baltimore recorded 196 homicides in 2011, breaking a symbolic barrier that eluded nine previous chiefs, all the way back to 1977. Fairly or unfairly, the mayor and commissioner - along with the city as a whole - have been judged and have judged themselves on the annual body count.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Downforce Racing, the new operator of the Baltimore Grand Prix, missed three of the five benchmarks that it agreed to have complete by March 15 under its contract with the city, a spokesman for the mayor said. The race organizer and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration are still working out the terms of three agreements that were scheduled to be complete by Thursday, according to Ryan O'Doherty, a spokesman for the mayor. Technical information in the ticket escrow agreement, which will govern how the city collects its share of ticket proceeds, is being checked for accuracy, he said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
How much in savings and investments should you have by age 35 or 45? Or, for that matter, at 65 when you're likely to be near retirement? If you don't know, you have plenty of company. So many figures are bounced about that it's often difficult for people to know what's the right amount. Many workers end up saving what they can and hoping for the best. That's why some financial advisers now use a simple yardstick to help clients quickly see how they measure up. It suggests the amount of savings and investments you should have in relation to income at different ages.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
Joe Pawley says he's fighting to save his children's future, and he's feeling very alone right now. During routine testing last summer, his 2-year-old son, Aaron, was found to have a dangerous level of lead in his blood, and city health workers found the toxic metal in the paint on the window sills, baseboards and walls of the Pawleys' rowhouse in Southwest Baltimore. The family sought help from the city Health Department to hire a contractor to remove or cover the deteriorating lead paint, which could cause lifelong learning and behavioral problems for their three young children.
NEWS
November 9, 2009
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown publicly demanded Friday that the Afghan government rein in corruption, saying he is "not prepared to put the lives of British men and women in harm's way for a government that does not stand up against corruption." We wish President Barack Obama would make a similarly clear public statement on the need for Afghan President Hamid Karzai to purge corrupt officials and bring effective governance to his people as a condition for continued U.S. support against the Taliban and its al-Qaeda allies.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 7, 2008
Fearing that the credit crunch is rapidly spreading worldwide and won't be quickly fixed by government rescue plans, investors bailed out of stocks yesterday and sent the Dow Jones industrial average down nearly 800 points by midafternoon. The market rebounded in the last hour and a half of trading, although the Dow still lost 369.88 points for the day to close at 9,955.50. It marked the first time in four years that the index had closed below 10,000, a psychological benchmark for many investors.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | August 25, 1996
1995 Simi Rose of Cabernet Sauvignon ($9). This exceptional California rose is finally on a sensible distribution schedule -- one that gets it to market while it's still fresh. It is a brilliant, authoritative, dry rose that cries out to be served with ham or grilled salmon. It offers wonderful floral aromas and oh-so-dry strawberry flavors. This is one of the world's benchmark roses and a thumb in the eye of snobs who sneer at pink wines.Pub Date: 8/25/96
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1996
Five years ago, Bruce R. Spector was a partner in a little Washington cable TV company when he thought he saw the future. And for all the breathless whiz-bang hype of the Information Age, it wasn't cable.Humble as it seemed -- and as pitiful a financial shape as it was in after a series of failed or struggling leveraged buyouts -- Spector and partner Joseph L. Mathias IV decided the future was radio. Based on that insight, they launched Benchmark Communications, a Baltimore company they hope to take public later this year, one that an industry peer says could be worth up to $160 million.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 2008
BAGHDAD -- The Iraqi parliament passed a bill yesterday to allow some former officials from Saddam Hussein's party to apply for government positions, in the first of the so-called political benchmark measures to pass after months of U.S. pressure for progress. The measure, which is expected to be approved to become law by the presidential council, was described by its backers as opening the door for the reinstatement of thousands of low-level Baath Party members barred from office after the U.S. invasion in 2003.
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