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By Lou Cedrone | December 19, 1991
BEN KINGSLEY, who won an Academy Award for best actor for his title role in ''Gandhi,'' plays mobster Meyer Lansky in Barry Levinson's ''Bugsy,'' which opens at area theaters tomorrow.So how does a man who played ''Gandhi,'' turn himself into a mob leader? And how does a man born in England manage to sound so authentically American in the new film?''Well, I'm just doing my job,'' said Kingsley, calling from New York. ''I worked on the accent.''It's great,'' he said. ''It's quite a different role for me, and I've gotten so much feedback because of it. It's so different from the roles I am accustomed to playing, and it's been great to work with Barry, who is the best.
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By McClatchy-Tribune | March 17, 2009
Starring Ben Kingsley, Penelope Cruz, Dennis Hopper, Patricia Clarkson, Peter Sarsgaard and Deborah Harry. Directed by Isabel Coixet. Released by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. $27.96. Rated R. *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) There always seems to be a shortage of good, mature movies for adults. And by "adult," we're talking about movies that treat sex as both a natural part of human life and as just one part of that life. Elegy, based on Philip Roth's novella The Dying Animal, is about a middle-aged professor (Ben Kingsley)
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June 29, 2001
`Sexy Beast' In "Sexy Beast," Ben Kingsley's hardened British criminal is like a cannonball shot straight into the soft gut of Ray Winstone, his retired associate. And that's how Kingsley's bravura performance functions in this MTV-style heist picture: He gives the movie a jolt and blows the rest of it to pieces. Act I evokes Winstone's life of leisure at his dream house in Spain's Costa del Sol, with his ex-porn star wife (Amanda Redman) and his weathered British expat friend (Cavan Kendall)
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By Capsules by Michael Sragow | September 26, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Boy A : *** ( 3 STARS)This film centers on a young man released from prison after a lengthy term for an atrocity committed when he was a child. Andrew Garfield pulls off a death-defying act of imagination in the role. With a new name and a made-up past, this profoundly troubled character manages to get a job and fall in love. His case worker (Peter Mullan) views him as his "greatest accomplishment." Our antihero is not so sure.
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By John J. O'Connor and John J. O'Connor,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 1996
Moses is with us once again on celluloid.He was played staunchly by Charlton Heston in "The Ten Commandments" and stolidly by Burt Lancaster in "Moses -- The Lawgiver." Now in "Moses," a two-part movie which begins tonight on TNT, the Old Testament hero gets an intense workout from the always meticulous Ben Kingsley.Part of an international television series on Bible stories, which so far has succeeded quite admirably with "Abraham," "Jacob" and "Joseph," this "Moses" (filmed, like the first three, in Morocco)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 10, 1998
Oh, lord, look what they've done to Dostoevsky on network TV. They took "Crime and Punishment" and turned it into a two-hour "Columbo." All that's missing are the rumpled top coat and stub of a cigar. "Wait till I tell the missus about this one.""Crime and Punishment" is brought to you by NBC, the home of 10,000 awful made-for-TV movies about women who are attacked and/or murdered by men they thought they could trust. What in the world, you might well ask, ever made the knuckleheads in Burbank think they could do justice to Dostoevsky's dark and sprawling tale of a young student in 19th-century Russia who thinks he's above the law?
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 2003
The quest of Massoud Behrani is as ancient as dramatic literature. It's a search for home that is also a quest for a new self. Few actors could come better equipped to play such a role -- the starring part in the new DreamWorks film, The House of Sand and Fog -- than Academy Award winner Ben Kingsley. The high-powered drama, which opens nationwide Friday, shows us a man in jarring transition. When the Islamic Revolution ousted the shah of Iran in 1978, Behrani, a colonel in the Iranian army, was stripped of power, honor and country.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 22, 2007
You Kill Me kills you softly with its smiles. This scruffy gangster comedy about Frank (Ben Kingsley), an alcoholic hit man for the Polish mob in Buffalo, N.Y., proves that craftiness and hip performances can make a tasty pig-in-a-blanket out of an old and tattered sow's ear. You Kill Me (IFC Films) Starring Ben Kingsley, Tea Leoni, Luke Wilson, Bill Pullman. Directed by John Dahl. Rated R. Time 92 minutes.
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March 24, 1992
Jack Palance is a better than 2-to-1 favorite for this year's Academy Award for best supporting actor, in the opinion of callers to SUNDIAL. His portrayal of the crusty Curly in ''City Slickers'' earned him 102 votes.Tommy Lee Jones ("JFK") was a distant second with 42 votes, followed by Ben Kingsley ("Bugsy") with 13 votes, Michael Lerner ("Barton Fink") with 13 and Harvey Keitel ("Bugsy") with just seven votes."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 1, 1992
The only thing wrong with the British animated feature "Freddie as F.R.O. 7" is that it's overlong, overstupid and over here.A completely fruitless attempt to go mano a mano with the stately and vivid Disney animated tradition, the piece surely proves the relativity of time: At an hour and a half, it feels long enough for you to procreate, raise and send off to college a few new relatives!The story attempts to meld two separate traditions, the painterly, "classic" medieval vein that Disney mined so well with "Beauty and the Beast," and the high-tech showboaty pleasures of the James Bond oeuvre.
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September 11, 2008
STAFF CRITICS' TAKE ON THE TOP MOVIES Babylon A.D. What it's about : Vin Diesel (above) stars as a sullen bruiser who must reluctantly escort a mysterious, angelic young person (Melanie Thierry) to a far-off destination - the promised land of New York. Rated: R The scoop : This is not a terrible movie, but it quickly degenerates into chases and gunfights and not much else. Grade : * 1/2 Bangkok Dangerous What it's about: Nicolas Cage (above) plays a stoic assassin who could use some Zoloft but instead sullenly drifts from murder to murder.
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August 28, 2008
The Dark Knight What it's about: Citizens, lawmen and criminals - and an anarchistic freak called the Joker - respond to the emergence of the Caped Crusader. Rated: PG-13 The scoop: As the Joker, Heath Ledger (above) detonates a savage sick joke or two, but the whole movie is set up for him to be the jiving put-on artist of destruction, outwitting the squares. Grade: ** ( 2 STARS) Death Race What it's about: A souped-up destruction derby auto race, played to the death, on the grounds of Terminal Island, a prison for extreme violent offenders.
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By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,Los Angeles Times | August 22, 2008
Transsiberian is the quintessence of what critic Judith Crist affectionately refers to as a movie-movie: a picture that breathes entertainment through every celluloid sprocket hole while seeming, without affect or pomposity, to encapsulate the entirety of film history. A queasy-making train thriller directed with vibrant visual panache by Brad Anderson, Transsiberian stars Woody Harrelson and Emily Mortimer as Roy and Jessie, a married couple who regrettably opt for the picturesque route back home after two weeks of Christian fellowship work in China.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
The Wackness is a funny, touching mood piece about a New York City high-school grad named Luke (Josh Peck) and marijuana dealer who spends three months before college trading dope for therapy with his shrink (Ben Kingsley) and falling in love with the shrink's stepdaughter Stephanie (Olivia Thirlby). It's set in the summer of '94, and underneath its jiving, wise-cracking surface, it's the cousin of Summer of '42, a previous generation's male fantasy of losing virginity to a beautiful and understanding woman.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 22, 2007
You Kill Me kills you softly with its smiles. This scruffy gangster comedy about Frank (Ben Kingsley), an alcoholic hit man for the Polish mob in Buffalo, N.Y., proves that craftiness and hip performances can make a tasty pig-in-a-blanket out of an old and tattered sow's ear. You Kill Me (IFC Films) Starring Ben Kingsley, Tea Leoni, Luke Wilson, Bill Pullman. Directed by John Dahl. Rated R. Time 92 minutes.
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By CHARLIE MCCOLLUM and CHARLIE MCCOLLUM,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 24, 2006
Annette Bening likes complexity, at least in the characters she chooses to play. Bening, 47, is considered one of America's finest actresses, with a career defined by emotionally complicated roles: sexy con artist Myra Langtry in The Grifters; the chilly, driven Carolyn Burnham in American Beauty; and stage diva Julia Lambert in Being Julia. But in HBO's new Mrs. Harris, Bening takes on the role of a woman of true contradictions: socially prominent Jean Harris, convicted of murdering Dr. Herman Tarnower, her longtime lover and creator of the Scarsdale Diet.
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By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,Los Angeles Times | August 22, 2008
Transsiberian is the quintessence of what critic Judith Crist affectionately refers to as a movie-movie: a picture that breathes entertainment through every celluloid sprocket hole while seeming, without affect or pomposity, to encapsulate the entirety of film history. A queasy-making train thriller directed with vibrant visual panache by Brad Anderson, Transsiberian stars Woody Harrelson and Emily Mortimer as Roy and Jessie, a married couple who regrettably opt for the picturesque route back home after two weeks of Christian fellowship work in China.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
The Wackness is a funny, touching mood piece about a New York City high-school grad named Luke (Josh Peck) and marijuana dealer who spends three months before college trading dope for therapy with his shrink (Ben Kingsley) and falling in love with the shrink's stepdaughter Stephanie (Olivia Thirlby). It's set in the summer of '94, and underneath its jiving, wise-cracking surface, it's the cousin of Summer of '42, a previous generation's male fantasy of losing virginity to a beautiful and understanding woman.
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By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 27, 2004
It's 4 on a rainy morning at the All-American Diner on a deserted road outside Gallup, N.M. A bald, paunchy, amiable-looking restaurant supplies salesman (Kevin Chamberlin) is seated by a window, having a cup of coffee and reading a fishing magazine. He is jolted by the sudden appearance of an intense, sinister stranger (Ben Kingsley), who sits down opposite him and thrusts at him a clutch of drawings of mutilated corpses. Soon the salesman is rushing off to his car - but the stranger is already sitting in his back seat.
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