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By Michael E. Waller and Michael E. Waller,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
More than 50 years after nearly being killed in a car crash but then winning the U. S. Open Golf tournament 16 months later, Ben Hogan is still revered, in the words of pro golfer Ben Crenshaw, as "a total inspiration of what a golfer might look like." With the Masters Golf Tournament completed last week in Augusta, Ga., it's natural that amateur golfers turn their thoughts to a new season and a new dedication to lowering their handicaps. What better way than to study the master himself, the legendary Hogan?
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By Randall Mell and Randall Mell,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | August 7, 2005
The two top-ranked players in the world arrive at Baltusrol for this week's PGA Championship appearing to be near peak form. No. 1 Tiger Woods claimed the British Open last month, and if not for a balky putter that led to his second-place finish at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst in June, he would be aiming to close out a Grand Slam sweep. No. 2 Singh won the Buick Open at Grand Blanc, Mich., in his previous outing last week. He stared down Woods head-to-head in the final pairing Saturday, refusing to blink posting a 63 to Woods' 70 and cruising to victory despite a bold late Sunday run by Woods.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- The U.S. Open has always been the most egalitarian of golf tournaments. Plop down your entrance fee, screw your tee into the ground and take your best shot at winning the national championship.And of all the courses on which the Open has been played in its first 97 years, the Olympic Club was the site of what might have been the game's biggest upset. It was the place where a journeyman named Jack Fleck beat the legendary Ben Hogan in an 18-hole playoff in 1955.It didn't launch Fleck's career.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael E. Waller and Michael E. Waller,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
More than 50 years after nearly being killed in a car crash but then winning the U. S. Open Golf tournament 16 months later, Ben Hogan is still revered, in the words of pro golfer Ben Crenshaw, as "a total inspiration of what a golfer might look like." With the Masters Golf Tournament completed last week in Augusta, Ga., it's natural that amateur golfers turn their thoughts to a new season and a new dedication to lowering their handicaps. What better way than to study the master himself, the legendary Hogan?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
He has been a mythical figure to this generation of golf fans. A virtual recluse since playing his last competitive round in 1971 at age 58, Ben Hogan died three years ago - two months after Tiger Woods had taken their sport by storm by winning the 1997 Masters at age 21. Their legends could forever be linked, as Woods tries this week to become the first player to win three major championships in the same season since Hogan in 1953. The roads they took to the top couldn't have been more different; their approaches once they got there have had some interesting parallels.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEWART | June 2, 1991
Webb Heintzelman and Jeff Maggert are 200 miles, two gol tournaments and light-years apart this weekend.Bethesda resident Heintzelman, 29, a two-year veteran of the PGA Tour, was in the western Pennsylvania town of Midway, competing in the $200,000 Quicksilver Open, richest of the 30 events on the Ben Hogan Tour. Heintzelman missed the cut by three strokes, shooting 73-76149.Maggert, 27, the leading money-winner on the Hogan Tour last year, is in Potomac as an exempt member of the PGA Tour, competing in his first Kemper Open.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1994
TULSA, Okla. -- A little more than a decade ago, Jeff "Squeeky" Medlen was an unemployed bricklayer for U.S. Steel in his hometown of Gary, Ind.Now he is the most famous caddie -- not to mention the wealthiest -- in golf.Yesterday's victory in the 76th PGA Championship by Nick Price gave Medlen one more victory in this tournament than his boss. "I've been very lucky," said Medlen.That was certainly the case at the 1991 PGA at Crooked Stick, when Medlen carried the bag of an obscure rookie named John Daly after Price pulled out the day before the tournament began.
SPORTS
By Fred Robledo and Fred Robledo,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 1991
A hush fell over the gallery ringing the 18th hole at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles.Sam Snead, never noted for his putting ability, was surveying a 12-foot birdie putt he needed to catch Ben Hogan and send the 1950 Los Angeles Open into an 18-hole playoff.As he was about to stroke the ball, there was the crack of a tree branch breaking from the weight of a man, who fell.Snead backed off while the gallery laughed.Hogan preferred not to watch. He was sitting with friends in the clubhouse, listening for crowd reaction.
SPORTS
By Ron Green and Ron Green,Knight-Ridder | June 20, 1991
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Arnie doesn't have to win for us anymore. Just show up, squint into the sun and pound one down the fairway, hitch up his britches, wave to the crowd and start after it.That's all the golf anyone needs, anyway.But that's not enough for Arnold Palmer. He's still the man who won 92 professional titles, including a basket full of majors, and -- he's not at all interested in being a ceremonial player in the game he popularized so heroically, 61 years old or not.Arnie's a splendid decoration, handsome to look at and one of a kind, but that notion comes close to insulting him. He loves the attention of the crowds but only if there are a few birdies to go with it.That's why yesterday was a good day. Arnie made seven birdies and shot a 4-under-par 68 in a pro-am preliminary to the PaineWebber Invitational at Piper Glen.
SPORTS
By Randall Mell and Randall Mell,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | August 7, 2005
The two top-ranked players in the world arrive at Baltusrol for this week's PGA Championship appearing to be near peak form. No. 1 Tiger Woods claimed the British Open last month, and if not for a balky putter that led to his second-place finish at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst in June, he would be aiming to close out a Grand Slam sweep. No. 2 Singh won the Buick Open at Grand Blanc, Mich., in his previous outing last week. He stared down Woods head-to-head in the final pairing Saturday, refusing to blink posting a 63 to Woods' 70 and cruising to victory despite a bold late Sunday run by Woods.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
He has been a mythical figure to this generation of golf fans. A virtual recluse since playing his last competitive round in 1971 at age 58, Ben Hogan died three years ago - two months after Tiger Woods had taken their sport by storm by winning the 1997 Masters at age 21. Their legends could forever be linked, as Woods tries this week to become the first player to win three major championships in the same season since Hogan in 1953. The roads they took to the top couldn't have been more different; their approaches once they got there have had some interesting parallels.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- The U.S. Open has always been the most egalitarian of golf tournaments. Plop down your entrance fee, screw your tee into the ground and take your best shot at winning the national championship.And of all the courses on which the Open has been played in its first 97 years, the Olympic Club was the site of what might have been the game's biggest upset. It was the place where a journeyman named Jack Fleck beat the legendary Ben Hogan in an 18-hole playoff in 1955.It didn't launch Fleck's career.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
The streak began on a soggy Sunday afternoon 20 years ago this week. It began with little fanfare at Pine Ridge Golf Course in Timonium, at a long-forgotten LPGA tournament called the Greater Baltimore Golf Classic, with a 21-year-old rookie beating veteran Donna Caponi by three shots.Nancy Lopez doesn't recall much about the week or the win."I remember we putted on a temporary green," she said last week.But the victory for Lopez was just the beginning of her march into history.Her streak of five straight victories in tournaments she entered broke the record shared previously by LPGA Hall of Famers Kathy Whitworth and Mickey Wright, and was the third-longest run in professional golf behind Byron Nelson (11 in 1945)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1994
TULSA, Okla. -- A little more than a decade ago, Jeff "Squeeky" Medlen was an unemployed bricklayer for U.S. Steel in his hometown of Gary, Ind.Now he is the most famous caddie -- not to mention the wealthiest -- in golf.Yesterday's victory in the 76th PGA Championship by Nick Price gave Medlen one more victory in this tournament than his boss. "I've been very lucky," said Medlen.That was certainly the case at the 1991 PGA at Crooked Stick, when Medlen carried the bag of an obscure rookie named John Daly after Price pulled out the day before the tournament began.
SPORTS
By Ron Green and Ron Green,Knight-Ridder | June 20, 1991
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Arnie doesn't have to win for us anymore. Just show up, squint into the sun and pound one down the fairway, hitch up his britches, wave to the crowd and start after it.That's all the golf anyone needs, anyway.But that's not enough for Arnold Palmer. He's still the man who won 92 professional titles, including a basket full of majors, and -- he's not at all interested in being a ceremonial player in the game he popularized so heroically, 61 years old or not.Arnie's a splendid decoration, handsome to look at and one of a kind, but that notion comes close to insulting him. He loves the attention of the crowds but only if there are a few birdies to go with it.That's why yesterday was a good day. Arnie made seven birdies and shot a 4-under-par 68 in a pro-am preliminary to the PaineWebber Invitational at Piper Glen.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEWART | June 2, 1991
Webb Heintzelman and Jeff Maggert are 200 miles, two gol tournaments and light-years apart this weekend.Bethesda resident Heintzelman, 29, a two-year veteran of the PGA Tour, was in the western Pennsylvania town of Midway, competing in the $200,000 Quicksilver Open, richest of the 30 events on the Ben Hogan Tour. Heintzelman missed the cut by three strokes, shooting 73-76149.Maggert, 27, the leading money-winner on the Hogan Tour last year, is in Potomac as an exempt member of the PGA Tour, competing in his first Kemper Open.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
The streak began on a soggy Sunday afternoon 20 years ago this week. It began with little fanfare at Pine Ridge Golf Course in Timonium, at a long-forgotten LPGA tournament called the Greater Baltimore Golf Classic, with a 21-year-old rookie beating veteran Donna Caponi by three shots.Nancy Lopez doesn't recall much about the week or the win."I remember we putted on a temporary green," she said last week.But the victory for Lopez was just the beginning of her march into history.Her streak of five straight victories in tournaments she entered broke the record shared previously by LPGA Hall of Famers Kathy Whitworth and Mickey Wright, and was the third-longest run in professional golf behind Byron Nelson (11 in 1945)
SPORTS
By Fred Robledo and Fred Robledo,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 1991
A hush fell over the gallery ringing the 18th hole at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles.Sam Snead, never noted for his putting ability, was surveying a 12-foot birdie putt he needed to catch Ben Hogan and send the 1950 Los Angeles Open into an 18-hole playoff.As he was about to stroke the ball, there was the crack of a tree branch breaking from the weight of a man, who fell.Snead backed off while the gallery laughed.Hogan preferred not to watch. He was sitting with friends in the clubhouse, listening for crowd reaction.
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