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SPORTS
April 11, 1991
What: 55th Masters championship, today through Sunday.Site: Augusta National Golf Club.Yardage: 6,905.Par: 36-3672.Format: 72 holes (18 daily) stroke play.Playoff (if necessary): Sudden death.Probable starting field: 88 -- 66 American pros, 3 American amateurs, 17 foreign pros, 2 foreign amateurs.Defending champion: Nick Faldo.Former champions in field: Tommy Aaron, George Archer, Seve Ballesteros, Gay Brewer, Billy Casper, Charles Coody, Ben Crenshaw, Nick Faldo, Ray Floyd, Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle, Larry Mize, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Craig Stadler, Tom Watson, Fuzzy Zoeller.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
The sun was setting early yesterday evening at the Baltimore Country Club, and in the last of the dying light, with shadows closing in, Fred Funk looked around the putting green. He was all alone. The Takoma Park native, 52, dressed in a bright green shirt and wearing his trademark visor, did not seem to mind the solitude. He put his head down again and continued his silent routine of rolling in three-foot putts, over and over. Just a few feet to his right, men in tailored sport coats smoked fine cigars and talked about the state of the economy with their wives, but Funk remained oblivious.
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SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 1997
BETHESDA -- Not only is 57-year-old legend Jack Nicklaus playing in his 41st consecutive U.S. Open, but it's also his 150th appearance in a major championship. But he's also hinting it might be his last U.S. Open.Nicklaus is a four-time U.S. Open champion, winning in 1962, 1967, 1972 and 1980."Jack is such a legend," Ben Crenshaw said. "To think that this could be his last Open is simply too much."Nicklaus, who is 9-over after three rounds, said he doesn't expect the USGA to grant him any more special exemptions into the Open.
SPORTS
April 8, 2006
Augusta, Ga.-- After Ben Crenshaw broke par at the Masters for the first time in 11 years in Thursday's first round, he was asked if he stood any chance of winning the tournament. Crenshaw, a two-time Masters winner, turned away the question with a smile and the gentlest of rebukes. "I've had my time here," he said in his Texas drawl. But after he followed that round with a steady, even-par 72 in yesterday's second round, leaving him five strokes off the lead and very much in contention after 36 holes, he was asked again about daring to dream the impossible.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | April 10, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Moved by the respect and love for the man who once held his hand, taught him the game and pointed the way, Ben Crenshaw had a motivation stronger than any inherent desire to win a golf championship -- even one so regal as the coveted Masters tournament.Yesterday's scene of Crenshaw holding his head in his hands and crying his heart out after the final putt dropped in the cup will be an unforgettable tableau forever etched in the minds of those who accompanied him on this moving sentimental journey to "win one for Harvey."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Forget the back nine here at Augusta National on Sunday at the Masters. If you want real pressure, check out the back nine at English Turn in New Orleans last Sunday.Just ask Davis Love III.Love needed to win there to get here, and did. His victory over Mike Heinen, on the second hole of sudden death, allowed Love to qualify for the 1995 Masters."It [the pressure] was pretty bad," Love said yesterday. "It was a different kind of pressure. There's the pressure you have to win your first tournament.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 28, 1991
POTOMAC -- Ben Crenshaw got his first look at the Tournament Players Course at Avenel yesterday and later said not only that he enjoyed the holes but also that the course couldn't be in better shape.Crenshaw couldn't compare conditions with those for previous tournaments, but his comments still will be welcomed by Kemper Open officials, who spent the past year in an improvement program that included bunker modification and tree planting to give the course greater definition.Crenshaw, who had not made a Washington appearance since the 1976 PGA Championship at Congressional Country Club, used his architectural knowledge in talking about the 6,917-yard layout, which has been the target of criticism in the past, including references to it as a "moonscape" and a wish that at least one hole be blown up."
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
The sun was setting early yesterday evening at the Baltimore Country Club, and in the last of the dying light, with shadows closing in, Fred Funk looked around the putting green. He was all alone. The Takoma Park native, 52, dressed in a bright green shirt and wearing his trademark visor, did not seem to mind the solitude. He put his head down again and continued his silent routine of rolling in three-foot putts, over and over. Just a few feet to his right, men in tailored sport coats smoked fine cigars and talked about the state of the economy with their wives, but Funk remained oblivious.
SPORTS
April 8, 2006
Augusta, Ga.-- After Ben Crenshaw broke par at the Masters for the first time in 11 years in Thursday's first round, he was asked if he stood any chance of winning the tournament. Crenshaw, a two-time Masters winner, turned away the question with a smile and the gentlest of rebukes. "I've had my time here," he said in his Texas drawl. But after he followed that round with a steady, even-par 72 in yesterday's second round, leaving him five strokes off the lead and very much in contention after 36 holes, he was asked again about daring to dream the impossible.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
BROOKLINE, Mass. -- As a 16-year-old high school phenom from Texas, Ben Crenshaw came to The Country Club for the 1968 U.S. Junior Amateur. He wound up losing in the semifinals, but his disappointment in the result was overshadowed by what happened to him at this historic setting that week.He fell in love.The roots of Crenshaw's well-documented passion for the game and its lore can be found here. It's a love affair that has lasted more than three decades and has played a significant part in a career that has been both fulfilling and frustrating.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
BROOKLINE, Mass. -- As a 16-year-old high school phenom from Texas, Ben Crenshaw came to The Country Club for the 1968 U.S. Junior Amateur. He wound up losing in the semifinals, but his disappointment in the result was overshadowed by what happened to him at this historic setting that week.He fell in love.The roots of Crenshaw's well-documented passion for the game and its lore can be found here. It's a love affair that has lasted more than three decades and has played a significant part in a career that has been both fulfilling and frustrating.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 1997
BETHESDA -- Not only is 57-year-old legend Jack Nicklaus playing in his 41st consecutive U.S. Open, but it's also his 150th appearance in a major championship. But he's also hinting it might be his last U.S. Open.Nicklaus is a four-time U.S. Open champion, winning in 1962, 1967, 1972 and 1980."Jack is such a legend," Ben Crenshaw said. "To think that this could be his last Open is simply too much."Nicklaus, who is 9-over after three rounds, said he doesn't expect the USGA to grant him any more special exemptions into the Open.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Ben Crenshaw gets misty just thinking about the sequence of events that made him the defending champion for this week's Masters.The tears that began on his fourth walk up No. 18 last year at Augusta National Golf Club still fog his eyes. Crenshaw choked up talking to reporters in the interview room yesterday. Today or tomorrow, when he shows Helen Penick around the grounds, he had best pack a handkerchief."There's not a day goes by that I don't think about it," Crenshaw said of his unlikely second Masters championship.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | April 10, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Moved by the respect and love for the man who once held his hand, taught him the game and pointed the way, Ben Crenshaw had a motivation stronger than any inherent desire to win a golf championship -- even one so regal as the coveted Masters tournament.Yesterday's scene of Crenshaw holding his head in his hands and crying his heart out after the final putt dropped in the cup will be an unforgettable tableau forever etched in the minds of those who accompanied him on this moving sentimental journey to "win one for Harvey."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- He is no longer the sweet-faced kid out of Texas with the limitless future, the 20-year-old who won a PGA event his first time out of the tee box. The years of struggle, both personally and professionally, seem to be behind him as well.A lot has changed for Ben Crenshaw since he won the Masters in 1984. A different wife. A different putter. A different attitude."I think I appreciate it a lot more now than I did then, and I know how much I appreciated it then," said Crenshaw, who was tied for the lead with Brian Henninger going into today's final round.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Forget the back nine here at Augusta National on Sunday at the Masters. If you want real pressure, check out the back nine at English Turn in New Orleans last Sunday.Just ask Davis Love III.Love needed to win there to get here, and did. His victory over Mike Heinen, on the second hole of sudden death, allowed Love to qualify for the 1995 Masters."It [the pressure] was pretty bad," Love said yesterday. "It was a different kind of pressure. There's the pressure you have to win your first tournament.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Ben Crenshaw gets misty just thinking about the sequence of events that made him the defending champion for this week's Masters.The tears that began on his fourth walk up No. 18 last year at Augusta National Golf Club still fog his eyes. Crenshaw choked up talking to reporters in the interview room yesterday. Today or tomorrow, when he shows Helen Penick around the grounds, he had best pack a handkerchief."There's not a day goes by that I don't think about it," Crenshaw said of his unlikely second Masters championship.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- He is no longer the sweet-faced kid out of Texas with the limitless future, the 20-year-old who won a PGA event his first time out of the tee box. The years of struggle, both personally and professionally, seem to be behind him as well.A lot has changed for Ben Crenshaw since he won the Masters in 1984. A different wife. A different putter. A different attitude."I think I appreciate it a lot more now than I did then, and I know how much I appreciated it then," said Crenshaw, who was tied for the lead with Brian Henninger going into today's final round.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 28, 1991
POTOMAC -- Ben Crenshaw got his first look at the Tournament Players Course at Avenel yesterday and later said not only that he enjoyed the holes but also that the course couldn't be in better shape.Crenshaw couldn't compare conditions with those for previous tournaments, but his comments still will be welcomed by Kemper Open officials, who spent the past year in an improvement program that included bunker modification and tree planting to give the course greater definition.Crenshaw, who had not made a Washington appearance since the 1976 PGA Championship at Congressional Country Club, used his architectural knowledge in talking about the 6,917-yard layout, which has been the target of criticism in the past, including references to it as a "moonscape" and a wish that at least one hole be blown up."
SPORTS
April 11, 1991
What: 55th Masters championship, today through Sunday.Site: Augusta National Golf Club.Yardage: 6,905.Par: 36-3672.Format: 72 holes (18 daily) stroke play.Playoff (if necessary): Sudden death.Probable starting field: 88 -- 66 American pros, 3 American amateurs, 17 foreign pros, 2 foreign amateurs.Defending champion: Nick Faldo.Former champions in field: Tommy Aaron, George Archer, Seve Ballesteros, Gay Brewer, Billy Casper, Charles Coody, Ben Crenshaw, Nick Faldo, Ray Floyd, Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle, Larry Mize, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Craig Stadler, Tom Watson, Fuzzy Zoeller.
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