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Ben Cardin

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June 2, 2011
Ben Cardin held off about as long as possible for a modern politician, but he finally caved to intense pressure. He launched a Facebook page. "Back in 1966, when I first ran for the Maryland House of Delegates, there was no Facebook, no Twitter, no YouTube -- not even the Internet," he writes in an e-mail that just popped up on my computer. "All we had to get our message out were yard signs, fliers, volunteers and a whole lot of determination. "But while the way we communicate has changed a lot, my dedication to improving the lives of the people of Maryland hasn't.
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NEWS
By Sanford Gottlieb and Daryl G. Kimball | January 23, 2014
Iran began taking verifiable steps this week to stop work on its most worrisome nuclear activities under the terms of an agreement with the United States and five other world powers. The breakthrough nuclear deal marks the first negotiated limitations on Iran's nuclear program in nearly a decade and opens the door for talks on a comprehensive agreement to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran. As long as Iran complies with the limits on its program, the P5+1 group (China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States)
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NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | November 17, 1996
WHEN Republicans retained control of Congress on November 5, they did more than make life miserable for Bill Clinton: They altered the complexion of Maryland's 1998 gubernatorial election.Benjamin L. Cardin, the popular Baltimore-area congressman and veteran state leader, is now "definitely learning toward" a race for governor. That's a 180-degree turn. The reason can be summed up in two words: Newt Gingrich.Up until now, Mr. Cardin had expressed an eagerness to stay in Washington. He expected a Clinton victory and a return to Democratic control in the House.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili visited Baltimore on Wednesday as part of a U.S. tour intended to build support for his country's bid to join NATO. Saakashvili visited the city to meet with Sen. Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat. He has also met with officials in Washington including Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State John Kerry. Cardin serves on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and co-chairs of the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, known as the Helsinki Commission.
NEWS
April 29, 1998
OVER THE past three decades, Maryland politicians have exhibited a certain schizophrenia in dealing with ethical problems. With great fanfare, governors and legislators have launched seemingly decisive ethics initiatives -- including financial disclosure measures -- that in the end were watered down. The result of this finagling has been predictable: Successive scandals have eroded the public's trust in elected officials and the way the state's political process works.A 15-member blue-ribbon commission appointed yesterday is the latest effort to rectify this situation.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
Ben Cardin hears the flattering talk wherever he goes these days.You're the one person who could do it, they tell him, the one Democrat with the stature and financial backing to withstand a rough party primary, defeat an incumbent Democratic governor and then beat the Republican.Wherever he goes, the five-term congressman finds another feverish recruiter who hopes he will challenge Gov. Parris N. Glendening, the weakened Democratic incumbent.Cardin and his wife, Myrna, listen and say they appreciate the kind remarks.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 5, 1997
Ben Cardin can deal with anything except uncertainty.Polls show that the only thing wrong with our governor is that no one likes him. He is Merlin's Royal Family.RDOne of the photographers arrested in Paris was a Mr. Rat. Fact.The downfall of the governor of Arizona is a late hit from the savings and loan scandals of the 1980s and a true Maryland tragedy.Pub Date: 9/05/97
NEWS
By Barack Obama | November 1, 2006
Something big is happening in America today. Everywhere I go, people are more attentive, more serious about this election than they have been in a long time. There is a sense that we have finally reached a crossroads in this country - a time when folks are fed up with politicians who are all talk and no action; a time when people yearn for leaders who are ready to stop worrying about their own problems and start solving America's. This is a moment for leaders like Ben Cardin.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili visited Baltimore on Wednesday as part of a U.S. tour intended to build support for his country's bid to join NATO. Saakashvili visited the city to meet with Sen. Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat. He has also met with officials in Washington including Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State John Kerry. Cardin serves on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and co-chairs of the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, known as the Helsinki Commission.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Republican Senate candidate Richard Douglas began airing a statewide radio advertisement on Thursday -- the first in the GOP primary -- suggesting that it's "time to wake Congress up. " Referring to Democratic Sen. Ben Cardin as "Rip Van Cardin," the spot argues that the first-term incumbent has been inattentive to national and local issues, including the rising price of gasoline and unemployment. The ads are running in Baltimore and elsewhere in the state. "Honey, did you see where gas prices could go to $6?"
NEWS
By Ben Cardin | February 19, 2013
If Congress fails to deal with the looming threat of sequestration, March 1 will be devastating for millions of Americans. That will be the day that automatic, across-the-board spending cuts begin to take effect - cutting $1.2 trillion from defense and nondefense programs over the next 10 years. Sequestration was scheduled to take effect Jan. 1, but the American Taxpayer Relief Act delayed it until March 1. Time is running out, and we must find a way to work together to reduce our deficit and avoid sequestration.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin is not slick. You won't find him on the Sunday morning network talk shows very often. He isn't a partisan quote-machine. He doesn't give an especially stirring stump speech. But what Mr. Cardin does have is more valuable than that. He is a man of substance and integrity who understands complicated issues and the art of compromise. More than ever, the U.S. Senate needs such leaders, and that's why we proudly endorse him for a second term. Senator Cardin is a familiar presence on the Maryland political scene.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
Despite a multimillion-dollar advertising blitz from one challenger and an aggressive grassroots campaign from another, U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin of Maryland remains among the safest incumbents in the nation as he runs for a second term, according to a new poll. Potomac businessman Rob Sobhani, running as an independent, has not cut significantly into Cardin's lead though he has pumped millions of dollars of his own money into the race. He may be helping the Democratic incumbent by siphoning some voters away from Republican challenger Daniel Bongino.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
Recently, Sen. Ben Cardin proclaimed in that "we must put an end to racial profiling" and held a press rally along with sending out e-mails. I disagree with his position. We cannot afford to be unrealistic about who or what we are looking at to protect our American freedoms. That's how we end up with Transportation Security Administration agents frisking children and grandmas without any suspicion that they might be doing something wrong. We don't have enough police or the time to screen every member the public.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
Once again, The Sun endorses its favored candidate, U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin, by refusing to cover any of the other contenders in the race. The rest of us can just go pound sand. In 2010, The Sun tossed us underdogs a bone in the form of an online blog but no print coverage. This year, it's an equally worthless online election guide. So much for fairness and participatory democracy. With no surprises left, The Sun will endorse Senator Cardin over the GOP nominee again this fall, even if Mr. Cardin drops dead in the meantime.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Republican Senate candidate Richard J. Douglas launched his first television ad Tuesday, criticizing incumbent Democratic Sen. Ben Cardin on the economy. Douglas, who is seeking the GOP nomination in next Tuesday's primary, is running the ad in the Baltimore cable market, his campaign said. The ad, titled "Cardin-omics," plays off a recent television spot aired by Cardin. It is the first television ad in the Republican primary. "Cardin votes against the Keystone pipeline, gas prices go up," the narrator says in the 30-second ad as words are written on a chalkboard and images of a classroom are shown.
NEWS
September 21, 2006
Instead of scheduling a time for their debut debate in Maryland's U.S. Senate contest, Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin and Lt. Governor Michael S. Steele are quarreling about who first approached whom to schedule a meeting. Via a series of letters between their campaign staffs, Cardin and Steele both claim to have made the first move. "In his letter yesterday acknowledging Michael Steele's desire for debates, Congressman Cardin wrote `We should let our staffs work out the details,'" Steele spokesman Doug Heye said in a letter.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
A reporter inquires about the way we refer to U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, because his staff says that he prefers to be known as plain old Ben Cardin. (He's running for re-election.) Can we do that? Sure. We're easy. We accommodated Jimmy Carter and Bob Dole, so Ben Cardin should be no strain.  Our practice at The Baltimore Sun  is to refer to people by the names they choose to use for public purposes. So we indulge k.d. lang and bell hooks in their typographical eccentricities* as well as just-plain-folks seekers of public office. Sometimes people change their names formally for purposes of being listed on the ballot, as did American Joe Miedusiewski, a former Maryland state senator.
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