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By Thomas B. Rosenstiel and Thomas B. Rosenstiel,Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1991
Washington -- What Americans remember most about Benjamin C. Bradlee might be that little shimmy of the hipsJason Robards delivered in "All the President's Men."It was a half-tango as Mr. Robards, playing Mr. Bradlee, walked away from Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman, who had just told him they had another story threatening to topple the president of the United States.That is one thing movies do -- confuse the actor with the role. The shimmy may have been Mr. Robards' invention.But it captured something, friends say, about Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, executive editor of the Washington Post and the most famous newspaper editor of his generation, who recently announced he will retire in September after his 70th birthday.
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By Jules Witcover | August 9, 2013
To a lifelong newspaperman, the abrupt sale of an iconic publication like The Washington Post seems akin to a personal loss, a death in the family, although the prospective new owner vows to keep it afloat. The Graham family brought a particular dedication and zest to holding the powerful in the nation's capital to account that meant more to laborers in the vineyards of The Post than a weekly paycheck, which in any event was never astronomical. The four years I toiled there, during the heyday of publisher Katherine Graham and unsurpassable editor Ben Bradlee in the early 1970s, were literally right out of arguably the best newspaper movie ever made, "All the President's Men," based on the nonpareil reporting of the Watergate scandal by youngsters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein that won the paper a Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
One colleague described Ben Bradlee as a man who could put his cigarette out on a coffee saucer -- "fine bone china, even" -- and escape being called a boor for it.That's how confident he is of his own legitimacy and personal authority. That's how blinding is the blaze of his charisma.This, of course, is exaggeration. But, then, so is Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, paragon executive editor of the Washington Post, illuminator of the Pentagon Papers, director of the Post's Watergate coverage, St. George to Richard Nixon's dragon.
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
One colleague described Ben Bradlee as a man who could put his cigarette out on a coffee saucer -- "fine bone china, even" -- and escape being called a boor for it.That's how confident he is of his own legitimacy and personal authority. That's how blinding is the blaze of his charisma.This, of course, is exaggeration. But, then, so is Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, paragon executive editor of the Washington Post, illuminator of the Pentagon Papers, director of the Post's Watergate coverage, St. George to Richard Nixon's dragon.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
In an era when news of complex and important issues is all too often reported in 15-second television news stories and articles offering little nuance and even less analysis, the work of serious journalists - both their formidable triumphs like Watergate and their distressing disasters - reinforce for us all why the First Amendment so forcefully spells out our rights of free speech and a free press.At the core of the First Amendment is the belief that discussion, debate and dissection of public affairs should be - in the words of Supreme Court Justice William Brennan - "uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."
NEWS
January 18, 1993
FROM the "what might have been" file: Ben Bradlee, who brought fame and journalistic prominence to the Washington Post as its executive editor, nearly went to work for The Baltimore Sun instead.Here's how it happened -- almost -- according to a September 1991 Vanity Fair magazine article on the now-retired editor, written by Peter J. Boyer.After graduating from Harvard University, Bradlee went to work for the New Hampshire Sunday News (1946-1948), started by his college pal, Blair Clark. When the paper was sold to William Loeb's Manchester Union Leader, he was left without a job."
FEATURES
By Rachel L. Jones and Rachel L. Jones,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 22, 1993
The inherent drama of Woodward and Bernstein's "All The President's Men" probably launched journalism careers for thousands of hungry, brash, young white males eager to carve out their share of fame and power. But few books have dared to portray the perspective of people of color on succeeding amid the tension and competitiveness of high-profile newsrooms.Anyone who thinks making it in mainstream America is effortless for "qualified minorities" has not begun to walk even an inch in those shoes.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 9, 2013
To a lifelong newspaperman, the abrupt sale of an iconic publication like The Washington Post seems akin to a personal loss, a death in the family, although the prospective new owner vows to keep it afloat. The Graham family brought a particular dedication and zest to holding the powerful in the nation's capital to account that meant more to laborers in the vineyards of The Post than a weekly paycheck, which in any event was never astronomical. The four years I toiled there, during the heyday of publisher Katherine Graham and unsurpassable editor Ben Bradlee in the early 1970s, were literally right out of arguably the best newspaper movie ever made, "All the President's Men," based on the nonpareil reporting of the Watergate scandal by youngsters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein that won the paper a Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
In Sunday's editions, the name of the commencement speaker scheduled for May 12 at Goucher College was reported incorrectly. The speaker will be Virginia Dondy Green, a partner in the Washington firm of Reed Smith Shaw & McClay.The Sun regrets the errors.Here is a list of college commencements scheduled around the state during the coming week:/%University of Maryland Eastern ShoreTime: 10 a.m.Date: TodayGraduates: Approximately 226Speaker: Clayton K. Yeutter, chairman of the national Republican Party.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre  presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be acquainted, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: CORUSCATING To coruscate is to give off flashes of light, to glitter, to sparkle. The adjective coruscating (pronounced KOR-uh-skate-ing) is commonly used metaphorically, meaning brilliant or striking in content or style. Describing John Sterling, Thomas Carlyle wrote, "In coruscating wit, in jocund drollery.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
In an era when news of complex and important issues is all too often reported in 15-second television news stories and articles offering little nuance and even less analysis, the work of serious journalists - both their formidable triumphs like Watergate and their distressing disasters - reinforce for us all why the First Amendment so forcefully spells out our rights of free speech and a free press.At the core of the First Amendment is the belief that discussion, debate and dissection of public affairs should be - in the words of Supreme Court Justice William Brennan - "uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."
FEATURES
By Rachel L. Jones and Rachel L. Jones,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 22, 1993
The inherent drama of Woodward and Bernstein's "All The President's Men" probably launched journalism careers for thousands of hungry, brash, young white males eager to carve out their share of fame and power. But few books have dared to portray the perspective of people of color on succeeding amid the tension and competitiveness of high-profile newsrooms.Anyone who thinks making it in mainstream America is effortless for "qualified minorities" has not begun to walk even an inch in those shoes.
NEWS
January 18, 1993
FROM the "what might have been" file: Ben Bradlee, who brought fame and journalistic prominence to the Washington Post as its executive editor, nearly went to work for The Baltimore Sun instead.Here's how it happened -- almost -- according to a September 1991 Vanity Fair magazine article on the now-retired editor, written by Peter J. Boyer.After graduating from Harvard University, Bradlee went to work for the New Hampshire Sunday News (1946-1948), started by his college pal, Blair Clark. When the paper was sold to William Loeb's Manchester Union Leader, he was left without a job."
FEATURES
By Thomas B. Rosenstiel and Thomas B. Rosenstiel,Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1991
Washington -- What Americans remember most about Benjamin C. Bradlee might be that little shimmy of the hipsJason Robards delivered in "All the President's Men."It was a half-tango as Mr. Robards, playing Mr. Bradlee, walked away from Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman, who had just told him they had another story threatening to topple the president of the United States.That is one thing movies do -- confuse the actor with the role. The shimmy may have been Mr. Robards' invention.But it captured something, friends say, about Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, executive editor of the Washington Post and the most famous newspaper editor of his generation, who recently announced he will retire in September after his 70th birthday.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1995
He had to wait a few months and endure a bit of public embarrassment, but William Donald Schaefer -- the former and once powerful two-term governor of Maryland -- finally has landed a nonpaying job as a trustee at a small southern Maryland college.During the summer, Mr. Schaefer was snubbed by his successor, Parris N. Glendening, who refused to appoint him to the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's College. At the time, Mr. Schaefer was rumored to be a possible candidate for his old job as mayor of Baltimore, and Mr. Glendening said he did not want to "politicize" the college board.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 27, 1995
Here would be the proper way to see "Blue in the Face." You're at the Rotunda. You came to buy new shoes, a book, a Radio Shack computer, flowers, yogurt, something. You call home, and your wife or partner or someone tells you that a certain appointment or plan you had has been canceled. You now have an hour and a half to kill. You look up and note that the movie is playing at the shopping center's little art house, although it started a half-hour ago. What the heck, you think.Here's how not to see "Blue in the Face."
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