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NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | October 7, 1990
There was no glory at the end. No debutante dancing, no New Year's Eve revelry that have been Belvedere Hotel trademarks since the hotel on East Chase Street opened in 1903.No. The sale of Baltimore's beaux-arts gem of rococo columns and mansard roof, was determined last week in the hush of a bankruptcy court. A judge more accustomed to deciding the fate of failing appliance stores and car dealerships shook his head and said there was nothing more to be done.It was a shame, he said, because the building was grander than its $5.5 million price tag would indicate.
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | December 28, 1990
The once grand Belvedere Hotel is passing into new hands with its purchase at auction for $3.5 million by a subsidiary of Meritor Savings Bank of Philadelphia.Yesterday's sale means control of the midtown landmark is no longer in the hands of Victor Frenkil, the local businessman who once had hoped to restore its elegance. It also ends the city's 15-year involvement with the Belvedere.Kenneth F. Davies, the trustee appointed by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to oversee the hotel, said none of the 112 hotel rooms will be rented after Jan. 1, and the Owl Bar & Grill and the John Eager Howard Room restaurant will also close Jan. 1.Over the years, the city pumped about $6.5 million into the hotel and tried desperately to recoup the money.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 23, 1998
GRIPE OF the week: Six months after he got out of a $1.7 million debt to the city of Baltimore, developer Jim Ward is out there somewhere, taking his merry ol' time about finding new tenants for Belvedere Square. The neighborhood deserves better. The remaining businesses deserve better.Ward's Belvedere was once a thriving shopping center on the north side of the city, a great gathering place. It gave a significant boost to Govans and the York Road corridor when it opened in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 22, 1995
Victor Frenkil, the man who set out to buy a piano and ended up with a hotel, returns to his beloved and once-beleaguered Belvedere today, bringing the original owls back to the Owl Bar, where they belong.If you don't know what I'm talking about, you're not hip to the legends of One East Chase. Frenkil, the politically connected contractor who bought the grand hotel in 1976 (after only intending to buy its grand piano at auction), desired to reopen the once-popular Owl Bar, too. But the owls, the bar's most famous nondrinking fixtures since World War I, were gone.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | October 7, 1990
Judah Hertz, the developer who is negotiating to purchase the upper floors of the Belvedere Hotel at 1 E. Chase St. for $5.5 million and convert the rooms to 125 condominiums, is also planning to spend another $900,000 to upgrade certainpublic spaces, including hallways and elevator lobbies inside the building.The U.S. Bankruptcy Court last week approved Mr. Hertz's plan to acquire most of the space above the first floor and for the city of Baltimore to take over the public facilities, including the Owl Bar, the John Eager Howard Room, and the 12th-floor ballroom.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991
The Maryland attorney general's office has charged a defunct health club with selling club memberships three months in advance without being bonded and continuing to sell memberships shortly before closing. Physiques of Belvedere, located at York Road and Belvedere Avenue, closed on April 30, 1989."Our office will not tolerate health club owners and operators who fail to properly bond their club, take people's money, and then shut the club down," Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said in a release.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
With no fanfare, construction crews have begun overhauling aging and neglected Belvedere Square in North Baltimore. The 103,000-square-foot shopping and office complex at Northern Parkway and York Road was built in 1986 and became a jewel of the area with three dozen shops, restaurants and offices. But in recent years it has fallen into disrepair, and it is less than one-third leased. Supporters are betting that the $14 million overhaul will result in a renewed economic anchor for the area, which includes the Senator Theatre.
NEWS
July 5, 2000
WHEN Belvedere Square opened with great fanfare in 1986, north Baltimore's well-to-do but underserved neighborhoods got what they had long wanted - a village-type shopping center of food purveyors, restaurants, boutiques and offices. The dream soon turned into a disappointment, then a nightmare. Today, the retail failures at York Road and Belvedere Avenue are among the saddest and most mystifying in the city. How did Belvedere Square deteriorate into a mostly vacant eyesore at a time when the surrounding residential city and county neighborhoods are booming?
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1996
More than 100 Northeast Baltimore residents last night urged members of a City Council committee to do whatever they can to help revitalize the nearly empty Belvedere Square marketplace.Councilwoman Helen Holton convened a hearing of the council's Economic Development Committee at Govans Presbyterian Church to hear from citizens concerned that businesses have been steadily leaving the once-thriving Belvedere Market.The market was the centerpiece of Belvedere Square, the 103,500-square-foot office and retail complex at York Road and Belvedere Avenue that opened in 1986.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | September 15, 1991
To capitalize on strong sales from the Belvedere Hotel's recent condominium conversion, a local development group has begun converting a nearby apartment complex to condominiums well.Belvedere Court, a 23-unit, $1.5 million residential and office complex, stands across East Chase Street from the historic hotel. Prices for its condominiums start at $33,000.The buildings at 10, 12, 14 and 16 E. Chase St. date from the 1870s and were renovated for residential and office use more than five years ago by James D. Locke Development Corp.
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