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NEWS
December 27, 1990
A subsidiary of Meritor Bank of Philadelphia today purchased the Belvedere Hotel for $3.5 million. The hotel went on the auction block after a Florida developer failed to meet a court-ordered deadline for purchasing the midtown landmark. Meritor bank held the first mortgage on the property, and its subsidiary will attempt to resell the hotel. Earlier story on B2.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Belvedere Square, with its hip artisanal vendors, has earned its stripes as a food-lovers' destination. The area just to its south, now home to a handful of casual, capable eateries, is poised to piggyback on that success. The newest of these restaurants is Flight American Fusion Restaurant & Bar. Opened in late August, Flight is a casual spot with an interesting menu, including a wide variety of vegetarian dishes and flavors inspired by the many different cuisines found in America.
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NEWS
October 3, 1990
Can a recycler of old buildings successfully convert the Belvedere Hotel into 125 condominiums? That's the key unanswered question now that a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge has ordered the 87-year-old landmark sold to Miami-based Hertz Group for $5.5 million. Builder Victor Frenkil, after all, tried every other concept -- from a hotel to rental apartments -- in the 15 years he owned the building and accrued some $12 million in mortgage IOUs.For a while, Mr. Frenkil seemed to succeed. The crowds of diners and merrymakers returned to the Belvedere's elegant public rooms, from the Owl Bar to the 13th floor bar. The hotel became the site for fancy weddings and bar mitzvahs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
On Friday, Belvedere Square will help pay tribute to the late Nelson Carey, the owner of Grand Cru, a European-style wine bar that has been one of the longtime anchors of the North Baltimore marketplace. From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., during Belvedere Square's weekly free   Summer Sounds   concert, merchants such as Atwater's, Ceriello Fine Foods and newcomer Tooloulou will be serving a different version of Carey's favorite food -- the hot dog.  Guests will be asked to make a $5 donation for each hot dog, and the money raised will be used to help finance the college education of Carey's daughter, Paige.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2001
City officials are awaiting a financing plan from prospective redevelopers of Belvedere Square, and both sides expect a deal to be worked out next month, officials said last week. A proposed marketplace for the deserted shopping complex in Northeast Baltimore was pitched two months ago by a development team made up of Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse, Manekin Corp. and the Hawkins Group, and received enthusiastic community reviews. With an option on the site in place, developers said last week that they expect to present city officials with a financial plan to revive the ailing plaza in mid-January.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1997
Ninety-three years of standing at attention have taken a toll on one of the Belvedere's four chimneys, causing it to move -- and traffic around 1 E. Chase St. to stop.Yesterday, a week after Belvedere employees noticed some movement in the northeast chimney of the 14-story building, the Department of Public Works closed the block of East Chase in front of the hotel, between North Charles and North Lovegrove streets, about 5 p.m.But for at least an hour afterward, some drivers in the rush-hour traffic missed the warning signs at Chase and St. Paul streets and had to come to a stop.
BUSINESS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
The Belvedere, the one-time grand dame of Baltimore hotels whose financial troubles led finally to bankruptcy court, has been sold to a New York group that will convert the midtown landmark into condominiums.John Hentschell Jr., real estate officer for Baltimore City, said today the group, headed by real estate developer Elliott Sharaby, paid "$3.8 or $3.9 million, which wasn't a lot."The sale of the 13-story Belvedere came approximately four months after the Meritor Savings Bank of Philadelphia foreclosed on Victor Frenkil, the previous owner.
NEWS
December 29, 1990
The trials and tribulations of the Belvedere Hotel never seem to end. First a Florida developer backed out of a contract to buy the building for $5.5 million. Then a foreclosure auction failed to produce a third-party buyer, prompting creditors to acquire the Mount Vernon landmark for $3.5 million -- which just a few weeks ago was the estimated value of the 97-year-old hotel's food and beverage operations alone.Over the past 12 years, Victor Frenkil sank nearly $12 million into the Belvedere, including $6.6.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | September 20, 1990
The owner of the Belvedere Hotel, facing the loss of more than $7 million in direct investment under a sale proposed by a bankruptcy trustee, says he is working on another deal that could limit his losses.Victor Frenkil said yesterday he is negotiating to sell the hotel to the Baltimore International Culinary College, which would operate it as part of its hotel management program."I believe [the college] has a desire to make an offer," Frenkil said.Frenkil would not name his asking price, but he indicated that a sale to the culinary college would be good for the city -- not to mention his financial standing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 17, 1997
When the Belvedere Restaurant Group (1 E. Chase St., 410-347-0888) lost Pauli Santi, aka Champagne Tony, it lost the chef its main dining room was named after. But now the Belvedere restaurants have come up with an interesting replacement. Morou D. Ouattara, a native of the Ivory Coast, has arrived from the Red Sage in Washington, where he was executive sous chef. He plans to focus on "contemporary American cuisine, emphasizing presentation as well as taste" at Truffles Restaurant at the Belvedere (the main dining room's new name as of May 1)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2014
All day Tuesday, they came to the Grand Cru wine bar with swollen red eyes, hugging one another and trying to make sense of the loss of a good friend and boss. They lifted a glass and reminisced about Nelson Carey, the genial and worldly publican of Belvedere Square, whose Grand Cru has been a popular destination for a decade. Mr. Carey, whose European-style wine bar and patisserie was more than a home away from home for an eclectic and devoted band of regulars, died early Tuesday of heart failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
It's sometimes difficult to know when to call the act of cooking an art or a craft. That's especially true of Meaghan and Shane Carpenter, owners and self-proclaimed "alchemists" at Hex Ferments, a new shop opening this week in Belvedere Square. Located behind Atwater's, Hex sells items such as sauerkraut, kimchi and kombucha. Fermented foods like these have found themselves in the spotlight as the ingredient of the moment with many high-profile writers and cooks — such as Michael Pollan, Sandor Katz and David Chang — touting their usefulness and health benefits in books or lectures.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Spike Gjerde, the culinary powerhouse behind Woodberry Kitchen and Artifact Coffee, has a new feather in his cap. This time, he's gone diner-style. Gjerde's Shoo-Fly Diner and Late Night Bar opened in Belvedere Square in October. Housed in the old Hess Shoes building (the former home of Crush restaurant), where generations of Baltimore kids got shoes -- and haircuts -- Shoo-Fly is laid-back with a rustic Americana vibe, kid-friendly, and very, very popular. Shoo-Fly doesn't take reservations, but when we arrived at 5:45 on a Wednesday evening, we got a table right away.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | December 18, 2013
It's hard to fault Baltimoreans for anticipating culinary greatness from Shoo-Fly Diner. This fall, expectations were predictably high when the restaurant opened in Belvedere Square. Having the name Spike Gjerde - the Woodberry Kitchen owner who has earned local and national acclaim through inventive farm-to-table cuisine - attached to a brand new place will do that. The hype led to a foodie letdown for some, as Shoo-Fly failed to deliver the meals critics had expected. But The Sun's Richard Gorelick ended his review optimistically, saying the diner should, in time, become "a good place to go. " Last Thursday night, as I sat with a friend to explore Shoo-Fly's intriguing bar program, Gjerde's latest effort seemed already there.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Shoo-Fly Diner, the new restaurant from Amy and Spike Gjerde, opened mid-October in the Belvedere Square building - a former Hess Shoes store - that has previously housed the restaurants Taste and Crush. Before their untimely closings, both Taste and Crush had respectable runs in this space. Even so, this location has taken on a reputation for being frustrating. If you talk to residents of the York Road corridor, where this handsome commercial building is located, they'll tell you that they're sick of their chain restaurants and weary of taverns that count for their dining options.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Shoo-Fly, the new restaurant from Amy and Spike Gjerde, opened Friday in Belvedere Square. The timing coincides with both the re-opening of the Senator Theatre, which is just across York Road, and the continuing upgrades in Belvedere Square's market building, where merchants have started keeping later hours on some nights to accommodate patrons from the movie theater.  Shoo-Fly occupies the free-standing building, originally a Hess Shoes...
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | March 3, 1992
YOU CAN'T keep the Owl Bar down.Just as it seemed the venerable watering hole at the Belvedere Hotel would join the long list of Baltimore has-been's, word comes that "serious money" is planning to reopen it. If you're over 40 and have been around town awhile, that'll be news that jogs your memory. The Owl Bar, like the hotel above it and the restaurant beside it, is a big part of Baltimore lore.The Owl Bar was where teen-agers went after the movies, the debutantes after their parties and the ageless after their youth.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | August 16, 1991
The Hertz Group, whose aborted attempt last fall to buy the former Belvedere Hotel is being investigated by a local attorney, has denied there was anything improper about its actions or its vTC relationship with the group that finally bought the midtown landmark.Developer Judah Hertz said in a prepared statement this week that his organization "has done nothing illegal and will defend itself vigorously" against recent suggestions that his organization may have defrauded the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Suddenly, Belvedere Square is the center of the universe, or at least north Baltimore. The Senator Theatre reopens to the public on Friday, following Thursday night's super-sold-out gala showing of "Hairspray. " It's also Thursday when the merchants in Belvedere Square's market start keeping later hours, in part to accommodate patrons of the movie theater. The market will now stay open until 10 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. But wait, there's more. Friday is now the expected opening day for Shoo-Fly, the new project from Amy and Spike Gjerde, who are the owners of Woodberry Kitchen and Artifact Coffee.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Beginning Oct. 10, the merchants at Belvedere Square will begin staying open until 10 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. The later hours coincide with the re-opening of the Senator Theatre, the long shuttered movie house located just across York Road. Atwater's, which recently acquired a license to sell beer and wine, will be among the merchants staying open later. The cafe won't be turning into a mega-bar.  Its offerings will consist of four draft beers and four draft wines, which will change with the seasons, according to owner Ned Atwater.
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