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Beloved

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NEWS
By James P. Pinkerton | October 19, 1998
OPRAH Winfrey calls "Beloved" the black equivalent of "Schindler's List." To be sure, every ethnic group has a right, and perhaps even a duty, to project its painful history onto the silver screen. If white southerners of generations past were entitled to "Birth of a Nation" and "Gone With the Wind," then surely the black experience in the South can be told in film, too, from "Cabin in the Sky" to "Rosewood."Once upon a time, Hollywood recreated history with regularity; wizened character actor George Arliss made a career in anachronistic costume, playing everyone from Benjamin Disraeli to Cardinal Richelieu to Baron Rothschild.
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NEWS
September 24, 2014
Baltimore is happily celebrating our Birds, who last week clinched their first American League division title in 17 years. The O's certainly earned cheers for the joy they've brought us all season. But other kinds of birds are in trouble. A report earlier this month indicated that almost half of North America's bird species risk extinction before the end of this century. Meanwhile, a National Audubon study of over 500 species found that most face major habitat loss as climate disturbances shrink and shift the places where they can live.
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NEWS
By JEFF ZREBIEC AND PETER SCHMUCK and JEFF ZREBIEC AND PETER SCHMUCK,SUN REPORTERS | December 22, 2005
Elrod Hendricks, Oriole for record 37 years Elrod Hendricks, an affable and beloved sports figure in Baltimore who spent 37 of his 45 seasons in professional baseball in an Orioles uniform as a player or coach, died last night. Hendricks would have turned 65 today. Orioles executive vice president Mike Flanagan, a friend of Mr. Hendricks', confirmed the death but didn't want to comment until he had notified other members of the organization. Mr. Hendricks died at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie, hospital spokeswoman Allison Eatough told the Associated Press.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Dr. Thomas F. "Tim" Herbert, a well-known Howard County physician who practiced family medicine in Ellicott City for 40 years, died Sunday of cancer at William Hill Manor in Easton. He was 86. "Tim was such a wonderful guy and he was wonderful to me," said Dr. Harry C. Knipp, a radiologist and longtime friend. "He lived and practiced medicine in the home he grew up in that overlooked Ellicott City. " The son of Dr. Alpha Nathan Herbert, a physician, and Dorothy Kraft Herbert, a registered nurse, Thomas Franklyn Herbert, who was known as "Tim," was born in Baltimore and raised in Ellicott City.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 12, 2002
LIKE MILLIONS of Americans, I'm pumped for the new season. Who wouldn't be? The scouting report promises another year of murder and betrayal, of greed and retribution, of lust and larceny, and of course all this makes me warm and tingly inside. That's right, The Sopranos, HBO's mega-hit series about the Jersey wise-guy life, returns Sunday after a 16-month hiatus, and if that isn't a reason to grab the remote and tear open the Doritos, I don't know what is. There's a school of thought that says what makes The Sopranos so compelling is that it deals with the ups and downs of ordinary life, portraying Tony Soprano as a sort of suburban Everyman, minus the Craftsman riding mower.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 1996
George Burns, the beloved cigar-puffing comedian whose career spanned vaudeville, radio, movies and television, died yesterday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif.Mr. Burns, 100, was the foremost comic "straight man" of his time in a partnership with his late wife, the scatterbrained Gracie Allen. He began a new solo career in show business when he was nearly 80.When he was well into his 90s, Mr. Burns announced with his customary brio that he had arranged to celebrate his 100th birthday, on Jan. 20, 1996, with an engagement at the London Palladium.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 17, 1999
THE SHRILL, whistling sound followed by a noticeable ka-boom you heard as 1998 came to a close was the sound of Oprah Winfrey's movie "Beloved" bombing."
NEWS
March 12, 2007
Arigesta Harris, a factory worker and mother of five who was a beloved figure in Baltimore's Cherry Hill neighborhood, died March 5 at the University of Maryland Medical Center of an aneurysm. She was 60. She died a week before she was to wed Tearan Melvin, her companion of 20 years. A graduate of Baltimore's Southern High School, Mrs. Harris worked for 15 years on the assembly line at Carr Lowery glass company. Later, after taking time off to raise her children, she became an employee at B&W Optical Co. She was at work the morning she became ill. Mrs. Harris, whose marriage to Arthur Harris Sr. ended in divorce, was a lifelong member of Mt. Sinai Holy Church in Cherry Hill.
FEATURES
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 29, 1998
What becalmed "Beloved"? Launched with galas and cover stories and borderline-reverent reviews, the Oprah Winfrey epic that arrived wrapped in Oscar predictions has been anything but beloved at the box office.In the five weeks since its Oct. 16 release, the $65 million picture, which stars Winfrey as a runaway slave whose nightmares continue well beyond the Civil War, earned a disappointing $22.5 million. Its failure, just 10 months after the fast fade of Steven Spielberg's "Amistad," another harrowing film about the slave experience, has prompted a rethinking of the market for prestigious, black-themed films.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 16, 1998
"Beloved" is the movie that couldn't be made, and was, about people who couldn't go on, and did.Admirers of "Beloved," Toni Morrison's novel about a former slave trying to rebuild her life during Reconstruction, were understandably skeptical when they heard that the Pulitzer Prize-winning book was being adapted for the screen. How could a movie ever begin to capture the book's complex structure, its poetic language, its interiority and rhythm?Director Jonathan Demme has solved that problem by narrowing his focus while hewing strictly to the novel's visual details and emotional tone.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Nelson Cruz presents a deep rooting dilemma for the modern baseball fan. Is the Orioles outfielder the well-mannered son of teachers who built himself into a slugger step by painstaking step? In this version of the story, Cruz is the perfect baseball hero - a humble guy from the northwest coast of the Dominican Republic with Popeye forearms and a beatific countenance, one who belts home runs at a league-leading pace and still takes time to say hello to his young fans. Or is he just another in the stained mass of baseball stars who seemingly took the easy way out by turning to performance-enhancing drugs?
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | March 28, 2014
It has been exactly 30 years since a covert convoy of Mayflower moving vans spirited the Colts out of town, but all that proves is that time doesn't really heal all wounds. That snowy night in 1984 still lives in sports infamy for the generation of fans who kept the flame and the generation that grew up hearing the sad story of Baltmore's betrayal over and over again at the dinner table. Which is why Ron Piper Sr. showed up this week for a Sports Legends Museum event commemorating Bob Irsay's despicable midnight ride wearing the blue vendor's jacket he wore for 23 seasons selling programs at Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
I would like to respond to the Lutherville resident who wants to end the tradition of Arabbers ( "Baltimore Arabbers on edge after rash of run-ins with cars," March 5). My wife and I moved to West Baltimore in 1970. Arabbers were a vital link for this community to secure fresh produce. We have lived in Baltimore continuously since that time and have grown to love the Baltimore tradition of Arabbing, respect its vital role in giving "food desert" communities a lifeline to fresh produce and appreciate the contributions of Arabbers to the community, such as providing local children pony rides during neighborhood festivals.
NEWS
By Brian Melton | February 17, 2014
With its reptilian eyes, gaping maw and upswept body line, the all-new 2014 Jeep Cherokee bears little resemblance to the boxy but beloved icon that arguably started the whole SUV craze back in 1974. In fact, at first glance, it looks downright weird. But that's OK because once you get used to that lizard face (and you will) you'll also see that the new Cherokee can boulevard along city streets and billy-goat through rough terrain pretty much like the old one -- and a whole lot more comfortably, too. Cherokee's revival is a timely market move by Chrysler.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
Willard Hackerman held no public office, but he was as much a city father to Baltimore as any mayor or City Council member, delegate or senator. Few, if any, have had a larger impact on this community than the 95-year-old man who died at Johns Hopkins Hospital Monday morning, and few have demonstrated greater devotion to it. Mr. Hackerman, the builder of the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the National Aquarium and the Baltimore Convention Center, has...
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - The pain, Dez Wells said Saturday, is familiar. It is personal. The Maryland wing lost a cousin to cancer when he was 14 years old. She was only 7. Zach Lederer, maybe the most famous student manager in Maryland basketball history, is older than that, but the anguish in College Park was no less intense, the end to come no less unsettling. The 20-year-old Ellicott City native, whose strongman pose and indomitable spirit in the face of brain cancer spawned a viral homage , was taken off life support Friday night, family members said.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 11, 1998
"Tell me your diamonds."This is one of many memorable lines in "Beloved," the film adapted from Toni Morrison's book that opens in theaters on Friday. The title character, a strange, otherworldly girl, is asking her mother, played by Oprah Winfrey, to tell the story of a long-lost pair of shiny crystal earrings.But when Winfrey - who has spent 10 years bringing Morrison's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to the screen - recently met with the press in Chicago, she was not wearing crystal. She was wearing very real, very big diamonds that dangled voluptuously from her ears.
NEWS
February 18, 2002
PITY THE POOR KITTY or pooch whose bereaved owner refuses to let nature take its course. The announcement this week that Texas A&M University has successfully cloned a housecat inspires the conflicting reactions of fascination and dread. To be sure, the technology amazes while it raises ethical questions and entrepreneurial speculation. Opponents of human cloning and many humane societies are screaming: Dolly the sheep opened Pandora's box, but CC the cat drags the evil right into the living room.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
For the Douglas clan of Nottingham, the most magical time of the year doesn't start until they spend a morning oohing and ahhing their way through the aisles of the glittering winter wonderland that is the annual Christmas display and sale at Valley View Farms in Cockeysville. For more than 40 years, employees at the popular garden and nursery center have started as early as the summer to transform its interior into a holiday cavalcade, including aisle upon aisle of ornaments from around the world, heavily laden trees as tall as 12 feet, and shelves of gifts that range from $400, hand-carved German nutcrackers to $19 stockings festooned with crabs.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 19, 2013
The Senator Theatre is like your favorite old aunt — the busy, independent one who never married but who loved her nieces and nephews and spoiled them with candy and fantastic stories. She dressed like a Hollywood starlet, with rhinestone glasses and lots of lipstick. She always looked glamorous and classy — several notches above Hon. She was all that, and for the longest time. Then, you noticed things, troubling things — a ripped sleeve here, a stain there, a run of bad-hair days.
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