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Bella Abzug

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NEWS
April 6, 1998
The Orange County Register said in an editorial Friday:WE won't miss her opinions, which we almost always disagreed with. But we will miss Bella Abzug the person, and her irrepressible spirit. And her hats.Bella Abzug served in Congress from a Manhattan district from 1970 to 1976. She was wrongheaded, we would say, on many issues, given her belief that the antidote for all social ills lay in federal intervention. She was an early and unrelenting opponent of the Vietnam War, though even there she was often right for the wrong reasons.
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NEWS
By Sheryl McCarthy | December 20, 1998
THE TIME has come to pick the top 10 news stories of 1998: The stories that have demanded the lion's share of our attention, affected us most deeply and taught us the most powerful lessons.Here are my 10 picks:1. The Clinton-Lewinsky scandal. This story not only consumed an excessive amount of our time, but also is the tragicomedy of the decade. The best thing to come out of this is the re-emergence of Hillary Clinton. The lesson: Brilliance, luck and drive can exist hand-in-glove with stupidity, weakness and ego.2.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron and Liz Bowie contributed to this article | April 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Known for a fearsome and feisty style punctuated by a broad-brimmed hat, former New York congresswoman and feminist pioneer Bella Abzug died yesterday of complications after heart surgery. She was 77.Ms. Abzug, who died at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in Manhattan after having been hospitalized for three weeks, was often considered the mother of the women's political movement, and she championed liberal causes and civil rights throughout her life.Making conservatives shudder with her dovish ideals and gravelly, Bronx-laced voice -- a voice that Norman Mailer said "could boil the fat off a taxicab driver's neck"-- Ms. Abzug fought against the Vietnam War and the draft, and for the Equal Rights Amendment and federally funded child care while in Congress between 1971 and 1977.
NEWS
By Lisa Schwartzbaum and Lisa Schwartzbaum,Special to the sun | April 12, 1998
Let's say you hoard back issues of Martha Stewart Living, that succulent magazine devoted to the spiritual uplift inherent in an educated appreciation of ribbons, trimmings and fancy vinegars.Let's say that therein you pay special attention to Martha's very finest work, "Martha's Calendar," the page on which the dauntingly busy woman regularly offers readers a day-by-day peek into her dazzlingly full life.("April 20: Turn on all outside faucets and chicken waterers.") Whatever a chicken waterer is, you're impressed.
NEWS
By Lisa Schwartzbaum and Lisa Schwartzbaum,Special to the sun | April 12, 1998
Let's say you hoard back issues of Martha Stewart Living, that succulent magazine devoted to the spiritual uplift inherent in an educated appreciation of ribbons, trimmings and fancy vinegars.Let's say that therein you pay special attention to Martha's very finest work, "Martha's Calendar," the page on which the dauntingly busy woman regularly offers readers a day-by-day peek into her dazzlingly full life.("April 20: Turn on all outside faucets and chicken waterers.") Whatever a chicken waterer is, you're impressed.
NEWS
By Rosalie Osias | April 5, 1998
TWO DECADES have passed since Bella Abzug emerged as a fiery champion of women's rights. Now, it's time for a new feminist movement - one that tells women how to set goals and how to achieve them within the reality of a male-dominated world.As the president of a not-for-profit foundation dedicated to recognizing the realities of the workplace, it is my hope that the next century allows women to use weapons still effective in the age-old battle between the sexes. The symbol for our new revolution?
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 28, 1993
NEW YORK -- It was a quintessential bit of New York political theater -- Mayor David Dinkins standing on the steps of City Hall surrounded by prominent Democrats, most of them Jewish, who were bestowing their blessing on his candidacy for a battery of cameras.You had to wonder why less than a week from the election Dinkins needs the testimonials of people like Bella Abzug and Abe Beame, the 87-year-old former mayor. But the message was clear: David Dinkins is good enough for these prominent Jews so why not for you people out there in Brooklyn and Queens?
NEWS
By Sheryl McCarthy | December 20, 1998
THE TIME has come to pick the top 10 news stories of 1998: The stories that have demanded the lion's share of our attention, affected us most deeply and taught us the most powerful lessons.Here are my 10 picks:1. The Clinton-Lewinsky scandal. This story not only consumed an excessive amount of our time, but also is the tragicomedy of the decade. The best thing to come out of this is the re-emergence of Hillary Clinton. The lesson: Brilliance, luck and drive can exist hand-in-glove with stupidity, weakness and ego.2.
FEATURES
By Clara G. Herrera and Clara G. Herrera,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | September 23, 1994
When Susan Lowell Butler, 50, was a schoolgirl, she didn't know about the roles women played in America's history. They were seldom discussed in the classes she took.Now, as executive director of the National Women's Hall of Fame, Ms. Butler is trying to make up for that.Tomorrow, 25 women will be inducted into the hall of fame in Seneca Falls, N.Y. An additional 82 women have already been honored there."When I was growing up, I never heard about women's history. It's not in the history books," Ms. Butler said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 13, 1992
DUBLIN, Ireland -- Women from 53 countries ended their international summit on a note of conflict, with some of the 400-plus delegates complaining that elitism -- not solidarity -- was the net effect.Although many participants praised the four-day conference organized by Washington activist Irene Natividad, the gathering closed yesterday with a protest by Irish working-class women who said that they had been denied a voice here.The 10 Irish women received a standing ovation after being allowed to take the floor during the conference's final 20 minutes.
NEWS
April 6, 1998
The Orange County Register said in an editorial Friday:WE won't miss her opinions, which we almost always disagreed with. But we will miss Bella Abzug the person, and her irrepressible spirit. And her hats.Bella Abzug served in Congress from a Manhattan district from 1970 to 1976. She was wrongheaded, we would say, on many issues, given her belief that the antidote for all social ills lay in federal intervention. She was an early and unrelenting opponent of the Vietnam War, though even there she was often right for the wrong reasons.
NEWS
By Rosalie Osias | April 5, 1998
TWO DECADES have passed since Bella Abzug emerged as a fiery champion of women's rights. Now, it's time for a new feminist movement - one that tells women how to set goals and how to achieve them within the reality of a male-dominated world.As the president of a not-for-profit foundation dedicated to recognizing the realities of the workplace, it is my hope that the next century allows women to use weapons still effective in the age-old battle between the sexes. The symbol for our new revolution?
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron and Liz Bowie contributed to this article | April 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Known for a fearsome and feisty style punctuated by a broad-brimmed hat, former New York congresswoman and feminist pioneer Bella Abzug died yesterday of complications after heart surgery. She was 77.Ms. Abzug, who died at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in Manhattan after having been hospitalized for three weeks, was often considered the mother of the women's political movement, and she championed liberal causes and civil rights throughout her life.Making conservatives shudder with her dovish ideals and gravelly, Bronx-laced voice -- a voice that Norman Mailer said "could boil the fat off a taxicab driver's neck"-- Ms. Abzug fought against the Vietnam War and the draft, and for the Equal Rights Amendment and federally funded child care while in Congress between 1971 and 1977.
FEATURES
By Clara G. Herrera and Clara G. Herrera,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | September 23, 1994
When Susan Lowell Butler, 50, was a schoolgirl, she didn't know about the roles women played in America's history. They were seldom discussed in the classes she took.Now, as executive director of the National Women's Hall of Fame, Ms. Butler is trying to make up for that.Tomorrow, 25 women will be inducted into the hall of fame in Seneca Falls, N.Y. An additional 82 women have already been honored there."When I was growing up, I never heard about women's history. It's not in the history books," Ms. Butler said.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 28, 1993
NEW YORK -- It was a quintessential bit of New York political theater -- Mayor David Dinkins standing on the steps of City Hall surrounded by prominent Democrats, most of them Jewish, who were bestowing their blessing on his candidacy for a battery of cameras.You had to wonder why less than a week from the election Dinkins needs the testimonials of people like Bella Abzug and Abe Beame, the 87-year-old former mayor. But the message was clear: David Dinkins is good enough for these prominent Jews so why not for you people out there in Brooklyn and Queens?
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- From postmaster to president, photographer Richard Avedon has enjoyed a brilliant career capturing the familiar and sometimes not so memorable faces of this country's recent political history.On an assignment for Rolling Stone magazine in 1976, Mr. Avedon set out to photograph the candidates running for the nation's highest office in the first post-Watergate election.He didn't stop with Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, however. It soon included policy shapers from migrant farm fields to Capitol Hill.
NEWS
April 13, 1998
GBMC merger must protect health choices at life's beginning, endThe Greater Baltimore Medical Center's board of directors is about to make a decision that may affect the health of Baltimore-area women and their families. The hospital has always been the area's leader for women's health care. GBMC was formed by the merger of Presbyterian Eye, Ear and Throat Charity Hospital and the Hospital for Women of Maryland.While we understand that the board believes that a merger with another hospital will build strength and alleviate financial pressures, women of the Greater Baltimore community do not want to be robbed of reproductive-care services.
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