Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBell System
IN THE NEWS

Bell System

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 20, 2010
Gordon H. Spittel, a retired Bell System telecommunications engineer and model rail enthusiast, died Feb. 10 of cancer at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. He was 93. Mr. Spittel, the son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad accountant and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Halethorpe. He was a 1933 graduate of Catonsville High School. Mr. Spittel went to work for Western Electric Corp. in 1937 and later took a job with Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. During World War II, he served in naval telecommunications in the Pacific.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 20, 2010
Gordon H. Spittel, a retired Bell System telecommunications engineer and model rail enthusiast, died Feb. 10 of cancer at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. He was 93. Mr. Spittel, the son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad accountant and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Halethorpe. He was a 1933 graduate of Catonsville High School. Mr. Spittel went to work for Western Electric Corp. in 1937 and later took a job with Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. During World War II, he served in naval telecommunications in the Pacific.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 18, 1993
Ten years is a lifetime in the constant technological churning of the electronics world. That might also prove to be the life span of the legal decree that dismantled AT&T, the communications giant known as Ma Bell, in 1984. This country's laws against monopolistic dominance over key industries haven't changed in the last decade, but technological advances may have overtaken them to the point they are irrelevant.AT&T's proposed acquisition of McCaw Communications, the largest cellular phone network in this country, has as many legal and competitive implications as it does technical opportunities.
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Michael Oneal and Jon Van and Michael Oneal,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 28, 2005
AT&T is one of the most recognized brands in the world. For more than a century, the long-distance telephone company has been an American icon, the quintessential "widows and orphans" stock. So why is "Ma Bell" suddenly in talks to get gobbled up by one of her offspring? "There isn't enough business to go around for all the hungry mouths out there," said Michael Birck, chairman of Tellabs Inc., which sells equipment to both companies. "Consolidation has to happen." Yesterday, officials from SBC Communications Inc. were in discussions to buy AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge yesterday blocked AT&T's $12.6 billion deal to buy the nation's biggest cellular-telephone company, saying that it would violate the antitrust ruling that broke up the old Bell system a decade ago.The decision may not necessarily derail AT&T's proposed purchase of McCaw Cellular Communications, but it throws a significant obstacle into the merger plans and is almost certain to delay the merger for at least several months.The...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department is close to recommending that a regional Bell telephone company be allowed to enter the long-distance industry for the first time since the government forced the breakup of the Bell System more than a decade ago.People familiar with the proposal, which would require the approval of a federal judge, say it would allow Ameritech Corp. to offer long-distance service to customers in metropolitan Chicago.In return, the company would be required to open its local-telephone business in the area to full competition by other telecommunications companies.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 12, 1999
BOSTON -- Bell Atlantic Corp., the largest U.S. local phone company, said yesterday that it plans within six weeks to ask regulators for permission to become the first regional Bell company in the long-distance business."
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
The Supreme Court upheld yesterday a key piece of federal law meant to undo the monopoly in local telephone service, but analysts were split on whether the decision would bolster competition and lower consumer prices, or merely sustain the status quo in a battered industry. In a 5-3 vote, the justices affirmed the system that the Federal Communications Commission established after Congress passed the Telecommunications Reform Act of 1996. The high court overturned an appeals court ruling and backed the federal system that allows phone competitors to piggyback on the former Bell System's extensive network.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
AT&T won by losing.The company that has emerged in the decade since it was separated from its local operating companies is far different from the plodding colossus known as Ma Bell. The culture that ruled the old Bell System has largely been purged. A master monopolist has transformed itself into a feared competitor.AT&T's triumph wasn't immediately apparent. After the long war with federal antitrust authorities ended in surrender, there came a painful reconstruction.Many Bell veterans had a hard time adjusting to a new, more competitive world.
NEWS
October 5, 1992
The consumer revolution that struck long-distance telephone service in the wake of the breakup of the old Bell system has now reached local users as well. By giving small telephone companies -- as unfamiliar to consumers as MCI or Sprint were 10 years ago -- access to regional Bell central offices, the Federal Communications Commission has opened a range of choices for local customers.The order gives small packagers of telephone services the right to plug directly into the central computers that control local access.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
The Supreme Court upheld yesterday a key piece of federal law meant to undo the monopoly in local telephone service, but analysts were split on whether the decision would bolster competition and lower consumer prices, or merely sustain the status quo in a battered industry. In a 5-3 vote, the justices affirmed the system that the Federal Communications Commission established after Congress passed the Telecommunications Reform Act of 1996. The high court overturned an appeals court ruling and backed the federal system that allows phone competitors to piggyback on the former Bell System's extensive network.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 12, 1999
BOSTON -- Bell Atlantic Corp., the largest U.S. local phone company, said yesterday that it plans within six weeks to ask regulators for permission to become the first regional Bell company in the long-distance business."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 1996
NEW YORK -- Ending a prolonged and public courtship, Bell Atlantic Corp. and Nynex Corp. agreed yesterday to one of the largest corporate mergers in U.S. history, people involved in the negotiations said.The two regional telephone companies plan to announce the deal today at a news conference in New York, after a weekend of deliberations in which their boards unanimously approved the merger.The merger, coming after two years of on-again, off-again talks, would create the second-largest phone company in the United States after AT&T -- with a stock market value of $51 billion, annual sales of close to $27 billion, 127,600 employees and more than 36 million customers in 13 states, from Maine to Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
If the devil is in the details, the Public Service Commission case known as MFS-II comes to Maryland straight from the regulatory inferno.After months of high-priced lawyering and days of tedious testimony, the record is finally closed in the little-known but crucial proceeding. Sometime late this fall, the PSC will render its decision in the case, which could determine whether competition thrives or withers in the state's telephone business.At stake is how much businesses -- and, down the line, possibly consumers -- will end up paying for telephone services at a time when the proliferating use of devices such as fax machines, computers and cellular phones is escalating demand.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | March 18, 1995
U.S. District Judge Harold J. Greene gave permission to Bell Atlantic Corp. yesterday to transmit TV programs virtually anywhere in the country -- a move that will let the telephone company extend the reach and cut the costs of its video ventures.Judge Greene's ruling in Washington came as a waiver to the "modified final judgment" (MFJ) that has been the de facto charter for the U.S. telecommunications industry since it set the rules for the breakup of the Bell system in 1984.The MFJ, drafted at a time when sending video over phone lines would have been seen as science fiction, generally prohibited regional Bell companies from transmitting signals across long-distance lines.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department is close to recommending that a regional Bell telephone company be allowed to enter the long-distance industry for the first time since the government forced the breakup of the Bell System more than a decade ago.People familiar with the proposal, which would require the approval of a federal judge, say it would allow Ameritech Corp. to offer long-distance service to customers in metropolitan Chicago.In return, the company would be required to open its local-telephone business in the area to full competition by other telecommunications companies.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | March 18, 1995
U.S. District Judge Harold J. Greene gave permission to Bell Atlantic Corp. yesterday to transmit TV programs virtually anywhere in the country -- a move that will let the telephone company extend the reach and cut the costs of its video ventures.Judge Greene's ruling in Washington came as a waiver to the "modified final judgment" (MFJ) that has been the de facto charter for the U.S. telecommunications industry since it set the rules for the breakup of the Bell system in 1984.The MFJ, drafted at a time when sending video over phone lines would have been seen as science fiction, generally prohibited regional Bell companies from transmitting signals across long-distance lines.
NEWS
August 16, 1993
Bell's GeniusRoyce Holland was quoted July 27 as calling the telephone industry something from the Jurassic Period and referring to "Bell System dinosaurs."He is obviously too young to really know the Bell System.The Bell Laboratories developed sound movies. Watch an old black-and-white movie where the credits show "sound by Westrex."The Bell Labs held (and may still hold) patents on such dinosaurs as transistors, solar cells ("batteries"), lasers and a host of other high-tech items. In the growth of telephone switching, the Bell System has gone through five generations of local switching systems and a variety of toll systems.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 16, 1994
Bell Atlantic Corp. said yesterday that it would cut as many as 1,100 jobs in Maryland over the next 3 1/2 years as part of an effort to redesign the company for the intense competition unfolding in the industry.The reductions, roughly one-fifth of the jobs that the Baby Bell expects to eliminate companywide, are part of a $2.3 billion plan to accelerate the company's transition from a labor-intensive telephone monopoly to a technology-driven multimedia competitor.The job cuts in Maryland could affect one out of 10 Bell workers in the state, but local union leader Charlie Gearhart said he was relieved that the numbers were not worse.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1994
Bell Atlantic Corp., accelerating its shift from the labor-intensive telephone business of old to the technology-driven industry of the future, said today that it will reduce its work force by 5,600 over 3 1/2 years.About 1,000 of the cuts will affect Maryland employees.The Philadelphia-based regional phone company, which includes Maryland in its service area, also announced that it will take a medicinal dose of red ink in 1994 in order to secure its competitive position in the future.Bell Atlantic will chalk up a record $2.3 billion after-tax charge against its third-quarter earnings, $2.15 billion of it related to an accounting change that essentially declares that its existing telephone network is worth less than the figure it has been carrying on its books.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.