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Bell Peppers

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By Linda Susan Dudley and Linda Susan Dudley,Copley News Service | February 2, 1992
Red bell peppers are hot. Well, not hot actually. Not like fiery red chilies. Hot as in popular or trendy.In fact, the word pepper can be confusing. Sweet peppers -- also called bell peppers -- are botanically related to chilies yet are quite different in their usage.Sweet peppers can be used in large quantities in a dish such as in stuffed peppers. Paprika is made from dried sweet red peppers. Chilies, on the other hand, are prized for their hot, spicy qualities. The potent ground cayenne pepper is made from dried chilies.
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Dan Rodricks | August 30, 2014
Like Thanksgiving, Labor Day is a national holiday. Unlike Thanksgiving, it does not have an official meal. One-hundred-and-twenty years on, it's time we had one. I'm nominating the peppers-and-eggs sandwich as the official meal of Labor Day, and I'll tell you why in a moment. First, some declarations. 1. Most people only think of Labor Day as a day off at the end of summer, or a good day to buy a dishwasher. Lost is its original meaning: a "national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.
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By COOKING LIGHT MAGAZINE | May 13, 1998
For most of the year, red, yellow and orange bell peppers are like precious gems: rare and costly. Then comes May, and suddenly grocery-store bins overflow with them for as little as two for a dollar. But why should you choose them over the usual green bell peppers this month?First, there is the flavor difference. Green bell peppers, because they are picked before they're ripe, have a tangy, robust taste. But when left on the vine to ripen, their natural sugars develop as they change hue. That makes red, yellow and orange bells' flavor sweeter, milder and more subtle.
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By Donna Ellis | September 8, 2011
Peppers are, arguably, among the easiest home garden crops to grow. Problem is, they take forever to do so. They usually don't come into their own until after the tomatoes are gone and the herbs are exhausted from the heat. So, herby, tomato-ey, peppery sauces become somewhat problematic. We can still do a lot with peppers, though, whether they're "plain old" bell peppers or more exotic varieties. Sticking good stuff inside them is a great approach. This way, we can create main courses — many of them pretty much one-dish meals — that will take us through these early back-to-school evenings when we're still using local produce but looking for something a bit more substantial for supper than raw veggies and cold meat.
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1997
As the days finally warm up, casual, low-maintenance meals are going to be in demand, preferably eaten outside. This tall-boy of a grilled tuna steak sandwich (or panino) with an Italian flair is designed to be impressive, but making it is ever-so-simple.The panini can stand on their own, but a fresh mixed-mushroom salad with a light Italian dressing finishes the meal. Fresh berries for dessert add the final fresh touch.Open-face tuna paniniServes 44 (4-ounce) tuna steaks2 cups water2 tablespoons sugar4 teaspoons salt1/3 cup mayonnaise1/4 cup chopped, sun-dried tomatoes (not in oil)
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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 12, 2000
Of all the seafood available, sea scallops are the most versatile. They have the meaty texture of fish steaks, the sweet taste of the finest lobster and the cooking speed of the most delicate fillet of sole. Fortunately, most fish departments carry good-quality sea scallops year-round. Most likely, the product that you buy is commercially frozen and thawed. The quality is still excellent. However, the freezing and thawing process makes scallops especially perishable. You should prepare scallops within 24 hours of purchase.
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 31, 1996
This healthy and hasty dish hails from the Mediterranean region, where capers and bell peppers abound. You'll notice that the cooking technique makes efficient use of all the ingredients: The juice from the tomatoes is used first to steam the bell peppers and chicken. It is then thickened slightly for the sauce.Look for couscous in the pasta and rice section of the supermarket or the gourmet aisle. Since the version we use is quick-cooking, it will fluff up in about five minutes.For dessert, buy shortbread cookies made with real butter (the difference can be tasted)
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to the Sun | December 31, 1997
These stuffed bells are inspired by the Greek cuisine of the Cyclades island of Santorini, where food is uncomplicated and the many indigenous ingredients are put to use. Follow the carefree theme with a store-bought roasted chicken for the meal. Toss together cucumbers, tomatoes and olives with some olive oil and lemon (traditionally, Greeks don't use lettuce in this salad). Buy some flaky baklava for dessert.Greek Stuffed Bell PeppersServes 44 red or yellow bell peppers3 cups part-skim ricotta2 cloves garlic, minced1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled1 egg, lightly beaten2 teaspoons oregano1/2 cup walnuts, chopped and toasted3/4 cup fresh bread crumbs2 teaspoons olive oilPlace peppers in a large oven-proof pie plate, cover with plastic wrap and microwave 4-6 minutes on 100 percent power, rotating after two minutes.
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By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 4, 1998
When roasted, red bell peppers seem almost like another vegetable, their clean, sweet taste developing earthy overtones, their crunchy flesh turning velvety, and their dazzling color deepening to brick-red.A peck basket (a quarter bushel) holds about 16 to 20 big "bells" - enough for a roasted pepper salad, sandwiches, pasta sauce, side dishes and more.Choose from three roasting methods: To keep the kitchen cool in fTC hot weather, char the peppers over an outdoor grill. Temperature control is easiest with a gas range, and if you're careful, you can keep two burners going at once.
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By Waltrina Stovall and Waltrina Stovall,Dallas Morning NewsUniversal Press Syndicate | August 12, 1992
When the days turn hot, this cold tomato soup is a great refresher. It is unusual in that the tomatoes are not cooked but lightly smoked.The smoky flavor is elusive. Other flavorings include bacon, jalapeno, onion, garlic, herbs and lime, with just a bit of orange juice to give it a slight sweetness.Pureed yellow bell pepper is mixed with sour cream to form a mock creme fraiche that is decoratively drizzled on top of the soup.The trick is to make sure the creme fraiche and soup are the TC same consistency.
NEWS
By Joanna Brenner and Joanna Brenner,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
They say the more colorful your salad, the more healthful it is. But instead of piling on the shredded carrots this month, try chopping up a bell pepper to decorate your mixed greens. Ranging in color from red to yellow to green and sometimes even purple, bell peppers are available throughout the year, but they are especially delectable during the summer months. It's well-known that bell peppers are high in vitamin A, but you might not know that they are also very rich in vitamin B-6 and folic acid, both of which help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | September 12, 2007
It's not uncommon to find red, yellow and green bell peppers packaged together like an edible stoplight at an intersection of the produce aisle. Heck, shoppers also can take a detour by plopping orange and purple varieties into their carts. Stop-and-go colors are not just an eye-catching marketing tool: The vivid hues also signal exceptional nutritional value. Thirty years ago, bell peppers came in one color: green. Although tasty, green peppers have less than half the amount of vitamin C as red, orange and yellow varieties, according to Russ Parsons, author of How to Pick a Peach: The Search for Flavor From Farm to Table.
NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY | August 5, 2007
Ah, the lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer are here, and gardens are overflowing with fresh vegetables. I went all out this year - planting boxes with turnip, mustard and tender greens, bell peppers, jalapenos, eggplant, tomatoes, scallions, onions, cucumbers and squash. Even though I just planted a few of each vegetable, the harvest is already plentiful. What am I going to do with all this stuff? My grandmother knew just what to do. What she did not use for her family or give away, she canned.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,SPECIAL TO THE TRIBUNE | September 15, 2004
Cod is turning up on so many restaurant menus lately. Its firm flesh is very versatile and lends itself to many fast cooking methods. Here's a simple recipe that teams the fish with a tangy relish topping. Tip: As an alternative to baking the cod, try grilling it seasoned very simply with vegetable oil, salt and freshly ground pepper. Menu: Cod with sun-dried tomato, roasted red pepper and caper relish Baby red potatoes Romaine with parmesan dressing Mixed berries and cream Peach-flavored ice tea Cod With Sun-Dried Tomato, Red Pepper and Caper Relish Makes 6 servings Preparation time: 20 minutes; cooking time: 20 minutes 2 1/2 pounds small red potatoes 2 teaspoons salt (divided use)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
Veal is an expensive choice for a weeknight dinner, but if you are celebrating a special occasion, it is worth it for its mild, versatile flavor. We've cooked the chops in a skillet to make better use of the delicious pan drippings. We've added a touch of the spice mixture known as herbes de Provence (rosemary, sage, thyme and lavender, available premixed in the spice aisle) and a warm bell-pepper slaw. Serve the veal chops with a spicy Rhone red wine, and for dessert buy those tiny French cakes known as madeleines at a bakery.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 18, 2003
Mildred S. Rodeffer of Dandridge, Tenn., wrote: "Some time ago, the Pirate's House in Savannah, Ga., served a dish called Savannah Oysters, which was absolutely delicious. I would love to have this recipe." Sherry Trabert of Baltimore responded. She wrote: "As soon as I saw the request, I had to send this in. A friend from the South gave me the Pirate's House cookbook many years ago, and I have found so many wonderful recipes inside. I believe the book is still in print and well worth seeking out. I hope it's what she's looking for."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | September 21, 1994
Q: I've read that red bell peppers are just green peppers that have had the added benefit of sitting on the vine to ripen and soak up more sun. However, a friend said that she bought seeds for red bell peppers. Which is the case?A: Red bell peppers do not come from the same seed as green bell peppers. All bell peppers, regardless of the color they are destined to become, start out green in the immature state. Depending on the variety, they will turn red, orange, yellow, purple,brown, or remain green upon ripening.
NEWS
By Joanna Brenner and Joanna Brenner,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
They say the more colorful your salad, the more healthful it is. But instead of piling on the shredded carrots this month, try chopping up a bell pepper to decorate your mixed greens. Ranging in color from red to yellow to green and sometimes even purple, bell peppers are available throughout the year, but they are especially delectable during the summer months. It's well-known that bell peppers are high in vitamin A, but you might not know that they are also very rich in vitamin B-6 and folic acid, both of which help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
I can't remember a winter as cold as this. In New England, where I live, as in much of the country, frigid temperatures have been the norm. Morning after morning the thermometer has registered single digits -- and that's without adding the wind-chill factor. It certainly makes entertaining a challenge. The best plans must often be laid aside when it is unbearably cold outside or when Mother Nature decides to deliver another blanket of snow. This very weather, though, has inspired a robust supper for a few friends who live nearby.
NEWS
By George James and George James,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 2002
HAMMONTON, N.J. - Ed Wuillermin, a third-generation farmer here, says this has been a good season for the Jersey tomato. Tom Sheppard, a farmer in Cedarville, on the other hand, gave up growing them this year. "This year has been both a good production year and a good market year," said Wuillermin, who with his brother August, operates Ed Wuillermin & Sons. But Sheppard, vice president of Sheppard Farms, chose to grow bell peppers this year instead of tomatoes because of depressed prices in recent years.
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