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By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
In one of the most serious cases of scientific misconduct in years, a star researcher at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey was fired yesterday after investigators determined he fabricated data in numerous high-profile papers. Jan Hendrik Schon, a 32-year-old physicist whose prodigious output and breakthrough electronics research were once rumored to be worthy of a Nobel Prize, fabricated or altered data in 16 research papers published between 1998 and 2001. Schon did this "intentionally or recklessly and without the knowledge of any of his co-authors," a five-member panel concluded in a report released yesterday.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | May 10, 2007
The Maryland Chamber of Commerce plans to induct three business leaders into the Maryland Business Hall of Fame tonight at its annual awards dinner. The new members are: the late Walter Sondheim Jr., longtime civic leader who was senior adviser to Greater Baltimore Committee; Jeong Kim, president of Bell Labs at Alcatel-Lucent; and Sister Helen Amos, executive chairwoman of the board of trustees of Mercy Health Services. They will be honored at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel. A passion for education was a hallmark of all three, Kathy Snyder, president and chief executive of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, said yesterday.
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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
In four short years Jan Hendrik Schon went from scientific nobody to one of the most talked-about young physicists in the world. His competitors had any number of reasons to be impressed. There was his jump from a little-known German university to Bell Labs in New Jersey, one of the most storied research centers in the world. There was his seemingly tireless ability to crank out scientific papers - 76 with his name since 2000, a pace that leaves many physicists in awe. But most of all, there was Schon's research.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
William O. Baker, 90, a prominent scientist and a former head of Bell Laboratories who advised five presidents on scientific affairs, died of heart failure Monday in Chatham, N.J. Trained as a physical chemist, he was president of Bell Labs from 1973 to 1979; he retired in 1980 as chairman of the board. Based in Murray Hill, N.J., Bell Labs is now the research and development arm of Lucent Technologies. During his tenure as president, Bell Labs scientists twice won the Nobel Prize in physics.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
William O. Baker, 90, a prominent scientist and a former head of Bell Laboratories who advised five presidents on scientific affairs, died of heart failure Monday in Chatham, N.J. Trained as a physical chemist, he was president of Bell Labs from 1973 to 1979; he retired in 1980 as chairman of the board. Based in Murray Hill, N.J., Bell Labs is now the research and development arm of Lucent Technologies. During his tenure as president, Bell Labs scientists twice won the Nobel Prize in physics.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | May 10, 2007
The Maryland Chamber of Commerce plans to induct three business leaders into the Maryland Business Hall of Fame tonight at its annual awards dinner. The new members are: the late Walter Sondheim Jr., longtime civic leader who was senior adviser to Greater Baltimore Committee; Jeong Kim, president of Bell Labs at Alcatel-Lucent; and Sister Helen Amos, executive chairwoman of the board of trustees of Mercy Health Services. They will be honored at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel. A passion for education was a hallmark of all three, Kathy Snyder, president and chief executive of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2002
In the Region Systems Alliance hires Funk as vice president Systems Alliance Inc., a software development company based in Sparks, said yesterday that it has hired Frederick Funk as vice president of operations. Funk, of Baltimore, will be responsible for product development, professional services and related activities. He previously worked for two other companies in the area, Aether Systems Inc. of Owings Mills and the former Caliber Learning Network of Baltimore. Elsewhere WorldCom Inc. to eliminate tracking stock WorldCom Inc., the second-largest U.S. long-distance phone company, will stop paying dividends on MCI shares, saving $284 million annually, and eliminate the stock that tracks the consumer unit.
NEWS
June 30, 1992
THE OTHER DAY, President Bush bestowed the National Medal of Technology on seven individuals. One in particular -- W. Lincoln Hawkins -- deserves special mention not because of any connection to Baltimore, but because of his efforts to guide minorities everywhere toward fields in science and engineering.Mr. Hawkins, who is black, is credited with devising light and durable plastic insulations for telephone wires that made universal telephone service economical in post-World War II America.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 19, 1998
MURRAY HILL, N.J. -- Lucent Technologies Inc. set a 2-for-1 stock split yesterday after the phone-equipment maker's share price more than tripled since its spinoff from AT&T Corp. nearly two years ago.The company also formed a $100 million venture-capital fund to invest in new wireless, semiconductor and software technologies. Lucent expects these fields to complement research at its renowned Bell Laboratories division, which invented the laser and the transistor.Lucent has rewarded investors with seven quarters of record revenue and profit that has topped expectations since its spinoff in April 1996.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
About a dozen members of the secret team that designed the first secure telephone system during World War II staged a reunion at the National Security Agency yesterday to celebrate the unveiling of a new exhibit at the agency's museum honoring their work. The team, the Army's 805th Signal Service Company, included several dozen of the country's top engineers and mathematicians. They created a system that converted voices into digital signals, the first system of its kind, which paved the way for computers, faxes and CDs. The system of encryption was so advanced, agency officials said yesterday, that it is still largely unbreakable.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
The student body president at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies - a Pakistani engineer who has been in the United States for 11 years - is facing possible deportation next month because of an immigration mix-up that he blames on advice he got from university officials. Zaid Safdar has obtained two college degrees in this country and worked six years at Bell Labs. He is scheduled for a deportation hearing June 5, when an immigration judge will consider the recent denial of Safdar's request to exchange his employment visa for a student visa.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
In one of the most serious cases of scientific misconduct in years, a star researcher at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey was fired yesterday after investigators determined he fabricated data in numerous high-profile papers. Jan Hendrik Schon, a 32-year-old physicist whose prodigious output and breakthrough electronics research were once rumored to be worthy of a Nobel Prize, fabricated or altered data in 16 research papers published between 1998 and 2001. Schon did this "intentionally or recklessly and without the knowledge of any of his co-authors," a five-member panel concluded in a report released yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
In four short years Jan Hendrik Schon went from scientific nobody to one of the most talked-about young physicists in the world. His competitors had any number of reasons to be impressed. There was his jump from a little-known German university to Bell Labs in New Jersey, one of the most storied research centers in the world. There was his seemingly tireless ability to crank out scientific papers - 76 with his name since 2000, a pace that leaves many physicists in awe. But most of all, there was Schon's research.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2002
In the Region Systems Alliance hires Funk as vice president Systems Alliance Inc., a software development company based in Sparks, said yesterday that it has hired Frederick Funk as vice president of operations. Funk, of Baltimore, will be responsible for product development, professional services and related activities. He previously worked for two other companies in the area, Aether Systems Inc. of Owings Mills and the former Caliber Learning Network of Baltimore. Elsewhere WorldCom Inc. to eliminate tracking stock WorldCom Inc., the second-largest U.S. long-distance phone company, will stop paying dividends on MCI shares, saving $284 million annually, and eliminate the stock that tracks the consumer unit.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,STAFF WRITER | January 30, 2002
Robert Lewis Miller Sr., an engineer who helped create a plastic clip now used on nearly every telephone, fax machine and home computer in the country, died Friday of complications of pulmonary disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Hampden resident was 65. Working at Western Electric Co.'s Point Breeze plant on Broening Highway in the 1960s, he was asked to find a way to mass-produce a wired plastic clip the size of a pencil eraser. It was to hold four telephone wires and replace an older technology.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
About a dozen members of the secret team that designed the first secure telephone system during World War II staged a reunion at the National Security Agency yesterday to celebrate the unveiling of a new exhibit at the agency's museum honoring their work. The team, the Army's 805th Signal Service Company, included several dozen of the country's top engineers and mathematicians. They created a system that converted voices into digital signals, the first system of its kind, which paved the way for computers, faxes and CDs. The system of encryption was so advanced, agency officials said yesterday, that it is still largely unbreakable.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,STAFF WRITER | January 30, 2002
Robert Lewis Miller Sr., an engineer who helped create a plastic clip now used on nearly every telephone, fax machine and home computer in the country, died Friday of complications of pulmonary disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Hampden resident was 65. Working at Western Electric Co.'s Point Breeze plant on Broening Highway in the 1960s, he was asked to find a way to mass-produce a wired plastic clip the size of a pencil eraser. It was to hold four telephone wires and replace an older technology.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
The student body president at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies - a Pakistani engineer who has been in the United States for 11 years - is facing possible deportation next month because of an immigration mix-up that he blames on advice he got from university officials. Zaid Safdar has obtained two college degrees in this country and worked six years at Bell Labs. He is scheduled for a deportation hearing June 5, when an immigration judge will consider the recent denial of Safdar's request to exchange his employment visa for a student visa.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 19, 1998
MURRAY HILL, N.J. -- Lucent Technologies Inc. set a 2-for-1 stock split yesterday after the phone-equipment maker's share price more than tripled since its spinoff from AT&T Corp. nearly two years ago.The company also formed a $100 million venture-capital fund to invest in new wireless, semiconductor and software technologies. Lucent expects these fields to complement research at its renowned Bell Laboratories division, which invented the laser and the transistor.Lucent has rewarded investors with seven quarters of record revenue and profit that has topped expectations since its spinoff in April 1996.
NEWS
June 30, 1992
THE OTHER DAY, President Bush bestowed the National Medal of Technology on seven individuals. One in particular -- W. Lincoln Hawkins -- deserves special mention not because of any connection to Baltimore, but because of his efforts to guide minorities everywhere toward fields in science and engineering.Mr. Hawkins, who is black, is credited with devising light and durable plastic insulations for telephone wires that made universal telephone service economical in post-World War II America.
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