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By Christopher Winship | November 16, 1994
Cambridge, Mass. -- AT A MEETING OF social scientists at the Harvard Business School last month, Richard Herrnstein's and Charles Murray's controversial book "The Bell Curve" came up.One group reported that in an earlier conversation they had "trashed" it.Heads around the room nodded in approval.I asked the room at large -- about 20 people -- how many had actually read the book. Two raised their hands.The condemnation of "The Bell Curve" in the media has been equally definitive.Most of the analysis has focused on the question raised in the book of whether IQ is hereditary and whether racial differences in IQ are predominantly due to environmental or genetic factors.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 1996
HILTON HEAD, S.C. -- With the budget breakdown unfixed and federal workers still uneasy, President Clinton opened the new year by tackling nothing more difficult than driving golf balls through the rain after staying up until 2 a.m. yesterday talking with friends.In a somewhat frantic one-day sojourn, Mr. Clinton flew with his family to this coastal playland to take part in the high-achievers retreat called Renaissance Weekend and indulge his love of golf.Some 280,000 federal workers remained on furlough, and the budget talks, stalled for months, were poised at what could be a climactic stage, but Mr. Clinton had agreed with House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole on a 48-hour break until today, and that opened up just enough time for the Clintons to make their 12th consecutive appearance at the retreat.
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NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
It's no coincidence a best-selling book that contends African-Americans are less intelligent than whites has become popular just as Republicans have won control of Congress, some local scholars say."The Bell Curve," they charge, was written to boost support for conservatives in the public policy debate over social programs.The book, written by Charles Murray and the late Richard Herrnstein, has been widely criticized for its claim that intelligence is a largely inherited trait. But defenders say the book is a valid scientific study that should be viewed as a call for more research about human intelligence.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | April 3, 1995
Dr. Robert A. Gordon's views on race and intelligence are so inflammatory that he has been a pariah in the Johns Hopkins University sociology department for 15 years. He's been branded by Rolling Stone magazine as a "professor of hate." Black students on campus have denounced him as a racist.Protected by tenure, Dr. Gordon has used a pulpit at one of the country's most prestigious universities to preach his vision of a world in which intelligence is color-coded. For years, much of the Hopkins campus has done its best to ignore him.But this year he is emerging from the academic shadows.
NEWS
By E. D. Hirsch Jr | November 1, 1994
Charlottesville, Va. -- THE BELL Curve," by Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein, has set off a heated debate over race and the genetic component of intelligence.While the authors do a responsible job of analyzing a vast amount of complex data, the limitations of the studies involved have been largely overlooked by social scientists and the public.Equally worrisome, the book's tone of social inevitabilty diverts public attention from the remediable failures of our schools.In essence, the authors argue that schools can do little to overcome the effects of hereditary determination and home environment on intelligence.
NEWS
By Bob Herbert | October 27, 1994
IN MONTCLAIR, N.J., where I grew up in the 1950s and 60s, there was an elderly woman named Mildred Maxwell who would greet the periodic outbursts of segregationists and other racial provocateurs with the angry and scornful comment, "There isn't a hell hot enough for that man and his ideas."Mrs. Maxwell comes to mind whenever I think (angrily and scornfully) about Charles Murray and his book "The Bell Curve," a scabrous piece of racial pornography masquerading as serious scholarship.Mr. Murray fancies himself a social scientist, an odd choice of profession for someone who would have us believe he was so sociologically ignorant as a teen-ager that he didn't recognize any racial implications when he and his friends burned a cross on a hill in his hometown of Newton, Iowa.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 3, 1994
IN 1969 I read a 123-page article about race and IQ by Arthur Jensen, a Ph.D. psychologist, in the Harvard Educational Review.It was full of jargon and graphs and formulas. It gave me a headache, and I vowed not to read such stuff again for the next 25 years.My gosh! Is it 1994 already? Yep, and as I began reading about "The Bell Curve" in newspapers and magazines, I feared I was going to have to do my duty once again.This time it looked as if it would be even worse. Reviews and columns about this hot new book on IQ, class, race, ethnicity and success said that "The Bell Curve" is 845 pages long and its authors are a Ph.D.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | April 3, 1995
Dr. Robert A. Gordon's views on race and intelligence are so inflammatory that he has been a pariah in the Johns Hopkins University sociology department for 15 years. He's been branded by Rolling Stone magazine as a "professor of hate." Black students on campus have denounced him as a racist.Protected by tenure, Dr. Gordon has used a pulpit at one of the country's most prestigious universities to preach his vision of a world in which intelligence is color-coded. For years, much of the Hopkins campus has done its best to ignore him.But this year he is emerging from the academic shadows.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 1996
HILTON HEAD, S.C. -- With the budget breakdown unfixed and federal workers still uneasy, President Clinton opened the new year by tackling nothing more difficult than driving golf balls through the rain after staying up until 2 a.m. yesterday talking with friends.In a somewhat frantic one-day sojourn, Mr. Clinton flew with his family to this coastal playland to take part in the high-achievers retreat called Renaissance Weekend and indulge his love of golf.Some 280,000 federal workers remained on furlough, and the budget talks, stalled for months, were poised at what could be a climactic stage, but Mr. Clinton had agreed with House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole on a 48-hour break until today, and that opened up just enough time for the Clintons to make their 12th consecutive appearance at the retreat.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | October 20, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- Suddenly it's no longer taboo to talk about brains.For a generation in this country, the subject of human intelligence has been as unmentionable as were certain body parts in the Victorian era. It could be alluded to, but only indirectly, and certainly not in public. Delicacy and convention demanded certain evasions.Now, all of a sudden, thanks to the publication of one powerful and probably inevitable book, the wraps are off and this difficult, provocative issue stands naked on the stage, with the floodlights on and the customers agape.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 17, 1995
POOR FRANCIS Lawrence, president of Rutgers. He has striven throughout his professional life to toe the p.c. line and now, through a slip of the tongue, finds himself on the receiving end of its ferocity.At the meeting of the Rutgers Board of Governors, convened to consider calls for President Lawrence's ouster, his defenders were hooted and shouted down. "They will never play another home basketball game at Rutgers until he's gone," vowed one student leader, referring to last week's sit-down strike by hundreds of students in center court that disrupted a game between Rutgers and the University of Massachusetts.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | February 5, 1995
Welcome to Black History Month.The January/February issue of the media review Extra! features a compelling package on racism. Particularly recommended are two pieces by Jim Naureckas. The first, "Racism Resurgent: How Media Let 'The Bell Curve's' Pseudo-Science Define the Agenda on Race," discloses that nearly all the research that 'Curve' authors Charles Murray and the late Richard Herrnstein relied on for their central claims about race and IQ were funded by something called the Pioneer Fund, described by the London Sunday Telegraph as a "neo-Nazi organization closely integrated with the far right in American politics."
NEWS
By Samuel L. Myers Jr | November 21, 1994
I KNOW THAT I am dumb. I admit it. Barely graduating from City College high school in Baltimore, unable to follow my distinguished father to Harvard University and living in the shadow of two brilliant sisters -- one a judge and the other a noted child psychologist -- I have long known what it means to be the dumb one.I also know what it means to be dumber than most of the other young blacks who attended Charles Hamilton Houston Junior High School....
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
It's no coincidence a best-selling book that contends African-Americans are less intelligent than whites has become popular just as Republicans have won control of Congress, some local scholars say."The Bell Curve," they charge, was written to boost support for conservatives in the public policy debate over social programs.The book, written by Charles Murray and the late Richard Herrnstein, has been widely criticized for its claim that intelligence is a largely inherited trait. But defenders say the book is a valid scientific study that should be viewed as a call for more research about human intelligence.
NEWS
By Christopher Winship | November 16, 1994
Cambridge, Mass. -- AT A MEETING OF social scientists at the Harvard Business School last month, Richard Herrnstein's and Charles Murray's controversial book "The Bell Curve" came up.One group reported that in an earlier conversation they had "trashed" it.Heads around the room nodded in approval.I asked the room at large -- about 20 people -- how many had actually read the book. Two raised their hands.The condemnation of "The Bell Curve" in the media has been equally definitive.Most of the analysis has focused on the question raised in the book of whether IQ is hereditary and whether racial differences in IQ are predominantly due to environmental or genetic factors.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 3, 1994
IN 1969 I read a 123-page article about race and IQ by Arthur Jensen, a Ph.D. psychologist, in the Harvard Educational Review.It was full of jargon and graphs and formulas. It gave me a headache, and I vowed not to read such stuff again for the next 25 years.My gosh! Is it 1994 already? Yep, and as I began reading about "The Bell Curve" in newspapers and magazines, I feared I was going to have to do my duty once again.This time it looked as if it would be even worse. Reviews and columns about this hot new book on IQ, class, race, ethnicity and success said that "The Bell Curve" is 845 pages long and its authors are a Ph.D.
NEWS
By Gary Phillips | November 3, 1994
BEYOND KENTUCKY'S verdant hills, horse farms and bourbon mills lies another world of cracked asphalt and unfulfilled dreams. There, in Lexington's Bluegrass-Aspendale housing projects, a police shooting last week spurred an angry response that gave Kentucky gentility a taste of that harsher reality. The incident seems forgotten already, but it gave us a glimpse of the problems our nation has yet to solve.The turmoil began when Antonio Orlando Sullivan, a suspect in a gang shooting, was killed by one of four officers who'd gone to the projects to arrest him. The police called the death accidental; one witness alleges Sullivan was shot while his hands were in the air.As news of the incident spread, some 100 youths from the project -- most of them African American -- went on a rampage in downtown Lexington, overturning police cruisers and news vehicles.
NEWS
By Gary Phillips | November 3, 1994
BEYOND KENTUCKY'S verdant hills, horse farms and bourbon mills lies another world of cracked asphalt and unfulfilled dreams. There, in Lexington's Bluegrass-Aspendale housing projects, a police shooting last week spurred an angry response that gave Kentucky gentility a taste of that harsher reality. The incident seems forgotten already, but it gave us a glimpse of the problems our nation has yet to solve.The turmoil began when Antonio Orlando Sullivan, a suspect in a gang shooting, was killed by one of four officers who'd gone to the projects to arrest him. The police called the death accidental; one witness alleges Sullivan was shot while his hands were in the air.As news of the incident spread, some 100 youths from the project -- most of them African American -- went on a rampage in downtown Lexington, overturning police cruisers and news vehicles.
NEWS
November 2, 1994
A letter to the editor from Joan Butler published yesterday should have read, ". . . for the past 30 or more years the subject of intelligence has been taboo for the public at large, but not within the scientific community."The Sun regrets the errors.Controversial Book Makes Valid PointsI am only 200 pages into the 800-page book, "The Bell Curve." But I would bet that Peter Schrag, who wrote an Oct. 27 commentary about the book, has never read it.To question the scientific nature of this book and call it "silliness" makes him look silly to those of us who are reading or have read it.It has been known for decades that there are differences in cognitive performance within and between groups, but for the past 300 or more years the subject of intelligence has been taboo for the public at large.
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