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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Charging that the regional Bell companies are "redlining" poor and minority neighborhoods as they make plans to roll out video-by-telephone services, a coalition of consumer and civil rights groups yesterday called on the government to delay the approval process for such ventures until strict rules can be adopted."
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HUGHLETT and MIKE HUGHLETT,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 28, 2005
CHICAGO -- With its purchase of AT&T Corp. nearing final approval, SBC Communications Inc. said yesterday that it will adopt the AT&T name, a brand steeped in historic glory but one that also carries some baggage. San Antonio-based SBC, one of the nation's largest phone companies, is buying long-distance provider AT&T in a $16 billion deal that was approved yesterday by the Justice Department, which also gave its blessing to Verizon Communications Inc.'s $8.44 billion purchase of MCI Inc. For both deals combined, regulators required the divestiture of some fiber-optic lines in 19 metro areas.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
In a move that could nudge the telephone industry toward a common standard for video technologies, Bell Atlantic Corp. and two other regional Bell companies teamed up yesterday to make a joint purchase of the computer systems that would bring advanced services into people's homes.The Philadelphia-based phone company joined with New York-based Nynex Corp. and California's Pacific Telesis Group to issue a bid solicitation for digital set-top boxes, the computer equipment that will take the stream of ones and zeros pouring over phone company lines and turn them into video images, sound and data.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators unanimously agreed yesterday to relax regulations on phone companies' high-speed Internet services, a decision cheered by Bell companies and booed by consumer advocates. The Federal Communications Commission voted 4-0 to reclassify digital subscriber lines as an "information service" that would be far less regulated than traditional phone service. The change means the government no longer will require phone companies to lease their high-speed lines at regulated rates to competing Internet service providers such as Atlanta-based EarthLink Inc. BellSouth Vice President Herschel Abbott said FCC Chairman Kevin Martin "should be widely applauded for pushing to completion these sweeping changes."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2003
If the Federal Communications Commission moves this week to end a key part of phone deregulation - a prospect cheered by the regional Bell companies and feared by their competitors - the scene in the commission's cramped corridor will illustrate why the government's 1996 plan to transform telecommunications was outdated almost as soon as the ink dried. After Thursday's meeting of the commission, lobbyists, phone executives and reporters will flip open cell phones and hand-held computers to report the result back to their offices.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 1995
In a big victory for local telephone businesses, a federal judge ruled yesterday that the seven regional Bell companies could offer long-distance cellular and other wireless service.Declaring that "effective, large-scale competition" would lead torapid progress in wireless communications, Judge Harold H. Greene opened the long-distance market to local companies -- on the condition that they can demonstrate measurable competition in their own markets.As the overseer of the 1984 antitrust decree that broke up the Bell System, Judge Greene rules on the Bell companies' efforts to expand beyond their core markets.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
Several senators are seeking consensus over legislation that would overhaul the 60-year-old law governing the nation's telecommunications industry, possibly easing the regional phone companies' entry into the long-distance business.According to people in both industries, Louisiana Democratic Sen. John B. Breaux and Mississippi Republican Sen. Trent Lott are trying to negotiate a compromise that would be less repugnant to the regional Bell operating companies than the approach favored by Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, the South Carolina Democrat who heads the Commerce Committee.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1999
Bell Atlantic today will become the first of the regional Bell companies allowed into the $80 billion long-distance market, signaling an era of competition in the communications industry, people close to the decision said yesterday.The announcement, expected from the Federal Communications Commission, would allow Bell Atlantic to sell long-distance services to 6.6 million households it serves in New York state.Approval would mark the first time since the breakup of AT&T Corp.'s Bell System 15 years ago that millions of consumers would be able to get both local and long-distance phone services from an offspring of Ma Bell.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
Bell Atlantic Corp. has launched a new advertising campaign urging people to call their local congressmen and complain about pending legislation that would "keep people from getting jobs."The print ads appear under a headline that reads: "Can you think of a worse time to pass a law that keeps people from getting jobs?" The ads, which carry the logo of Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., don't describe the legislation or explain why U.S. jobs are threatened. They do provide a toll-free number from which callers may obtain such information.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After negotiating at least a temporary cease-fire between feuding industry groups, the Senate Commerce Committee overwhelmingly approved a sweeping bill yesterday to rewrite the 60-year-old communications law.If enacted, the legislation would allow local phone and cable TV companies to enter each other's businesses, and it would gradually free the seven "Baby Bell" companies to offer long-distance service.After weeks of arduous negotiations, the Commerce Committee approved the measure by a vote of 18-2, a margin that greatly increases the likelihood that Congress will enact such a measure in September.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2003
If the Federal Communications Commission moves this week to end a key part of phone deregulation - a prospect cheered by the regional Bell companies and feared by their competitors - the scene in the commission's cramped corridor will illustrate why the government's 1996 plan to transform telecommunications was outdated almost as soon as the ink dried. After Thursday's meeting of the commission, lobbyists, phone executives and reporters will flip open cell phones and hand-held computers to report the result back to their offices.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
If one big change in telecommunications does come to Maryland in 2002, Darth Vader will likely let you know. His voice anyway. Verizon Corp. plans to file with the Maryland Public Service Commission this spring to win permission to offer long-distance phone service in the state. It has already won the right to do so in New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania and awaits federal approval for Rhode Island and New Jersey. If it wins approval in Maryland, the company will launch a heavy marketing campaign with its pitchman, the deep-voiced actor James Earl Jones.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
For the first time since the 1984 breakup of AT&T, one of the regional Bell telephone companies has won permission to offer long-distance service in its territory, a long-anticipated development that could be repeated in Maryland next year.The Federal Communications Commission said yesterday that its five commissioners had voted unanimously to allow Bell Atlantic Corp. to sell long-distance service in New York state.Bell Atlantic's New York application is seen as a bellwether for the company's entry into the long-distance markets of the other 12 states it serves, including Maryland.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1999
Bell Atlantic today will become the first of the regional Bell companies allowed into the $80 billion long-distance market, signaling an era of competition in the communications industry, people close to the decision said yesterday.The announcement, expected from the Federal Communications Commission, would allow Bell Atlantic to sell long-distance services to 6.6 million households it serves in New York state.Approval would mark the first time since the breakup of AT&T Corp.'s Bell System 15 years ago that millions of consumers would be able to get both local and long-distance phone services from an offspring of Ma Bell.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
The proposed $62 billion merger between regional telephone companies SBC Communications Inc. and Ameritech Corp. could prod Bell Atlantic Corp. to get back into the mergers game, analysts say.San Antonio-based SBC's planned purchase of Chicago's Ameritech would be the largest consolidation the merger-happy telecommunications industry has seen. The deal, announced yesterday, would make SBC the largest Bell company, giving it a local-service empire of 56.3 million lines in 13 states.The blockbuster deal reflects the industry's bigger-is-better mentality.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
In a quarterly earnings sheet that met most expectations but still failed to impress Wall Street, Bell Atlantic Corp. reported net income of $893.4 million for the first quarter, or $1.15 per basic share.This was a 28 percent increase from last year, when the phone company had $698.2 million in first-quarter earnings, or 90 cents per basic share.The first-quarter figures include $152 million in charges related to Bell Atlantic's merger with Nynex Corp. and the company's offer of enhanced pension plans.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder | July 30, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- How soon will it be before Bell Atlantic Corp. and its stockholders begin to see the results of last week's landmark ruling that will let the company offer "information services?"Give it two or three years, say managers and analysts. Don't hold your breath, say critics of the ruling."I don't think we can overestimate the impact of this ruling on our future," Bell Atlantic chairman Raymond W. Smith told employees on Friday, and he sketched for them a few of the "reasonably well-laid plans" the company has made to deal with its new-found freedom.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A key Senate committee will try today to finish writing a bill to reshape U.S. telecommunications policy while a divided industry continues to argue over what the measure should contain.The infighting threatens to push final approval of the legislation into 1995 or later."We're going to have some fireworks tomorrow. We're going to be bringing up a lot of issues," Ward White, vice president of federal relations at the U.S. Telephone Association, said yesterday. The association represents local telephone companies.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1998
Bell Atlantic Corp. and the big long-distance phone companies sharply disagree over how to let long-distance firms break into Maryland's local-service market.Yesterday, the parties took their disagreement to the Public Service Commission.This clash of telephone titans is all about market access. Long-distance providers like AT&T Corp. and MCI Communications Corp. want to compete with Bell Atlantic in providing local-calling service.There's just one problem with that: Bell Atlantic owns most of the state's local-service network, and duplicating that network would both inefficient and expensive.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 1997
In an implicit acknowledgment that AT&T may soon merge with a regional Bell telephone company, AT&T's chairman, Robert Allen, declared yesterday that such a deal would enhance competition.Allen declined to confirm reports that his company was negotiating a $50 billion merger with SBC Communications, nor did he mention the company by name. But in a speech to executives in Boston that seemed almost like a wink and a nod, Allen said that merging long-distance and local phone companies was not "unthinkable."
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