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By Scott Shane and Ivan Penn and Scott Shane and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1999
Evidently seeking a dapper look on the mayoral campaign trail, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III spent $4,323 in campaign contributions on his wardrobe during an April trip to Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City.Bell's shopping trip -- which was legal under state law but drew barbed comments from some political observers -- was part of $475,800 his campaign spent through July 1. He has spent more than twice as much as either of his major rivals, Carl Stokes, who reported spending $200,262, and Martin O'Malley, who said he has spent $153,806, both for seven months.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III finished his recent political quest for mayor much the way he began his career for public office 12 years ago -- by borrowing money from his mother.After building a campaign treasury of more than $1.16 million for his mayoral bid, Bell borrowed $5,000 from his mother, Elinor Bell, days after September's primary to pay debts, his latest campaign report shows.His cash balance at the close of the reporting period that ended Oct. 17 was $1,182.40 in his active fund-raising committee account and $1,434.
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NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1999
The Maryland Minority Contractors' Association endorsed mayoral candidate Lawrence A. Bell III yesterday, saying that under Bell's administration, minority-owned businesses would "get a better deal."Arnold M. Jolivet, president of the 1,000-member organization, said the City Council president was one of the chief sponsors of the 1989 bill that created goals for hiring minority contractors on city projects."He has worked hard on behalf of minority contractors," Jolivet said.As Jolivet spoke, about 60 huge trucks formed a caravan on North Avenue.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1999
The Maryland Minority Contractors' Association endorsed mayoral candidate Lawrence A. Bell III yesterday, saying that under Bell's administration, minority-owned businesses would "get a better deal."Arnold M. Jolivet, president of the 1,000-member organization, said the City Council president was one of the chief sponsors of the 1989 bill that created goals for hiring minority contractors on city projects."He has worked hard on behalf of minority contractors," Jolivet said.As Jolivet spoke, about 60 huge trucks formed a caravan on North Avenue.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1999
Despite a possible candidacy by his prominent cousin, Baltimore City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III is piecing together a political machine as he prepares to declare he will run for mayor.Bell, considered one of the favorites in this year's mayoral race, has lined up several members of his campaign team, even though a cloud appears over the campaign while the city awaits a decision about the possible candidacy of NAACP President Kweisi Mfume, whom state leaders in the General Assembly are pushing to run."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1999
City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III leads Baltimore's mayoral field in fund raising with $700,000, more than $250,000 above other contenders for the city's top job, officials in his campaign said yesterday.With more than $400,000 remaining, Bell is set to hit airwaves today with a television advertising campaign, said Tammy Hawley, Bell campaign chairwoman.Candidates for city office rushed to complete and file their financial reports with the city and state election boards by the close of business yesterday.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Jamie Stiehm and Gerard Shields and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III, who had considered running for mayor this year, handed a surprise endorsement yesterday to mayoral candidate Carl Stokes.The endorsement occurred as financial reports filed in Annapolis showed City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III with less money than his campaign had initially claimed.Bell filed an amended financial report that showed him with $354,000 going into the final weeks of the race. Last week, the Bell campaign said it had about $400,000.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
The disruption of mayoral hopeful Martin O'Malley's endorsement ceremony Thursday by supporters of his opponent, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III, drew criticism yesterday from veteran politicians, including one of Bell's aides."
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | August 24, 1999
Let's get this moving again.Lawrence A. Bell III -- LAB, as he's known on his own campaign schedule -- is working Northeast Market on a Saturday morning, shaking hands and repeating, almost mantra-like, "Need your help. Sure need your help. Tell your friends. I'd appreciate your help."His supporters swarm around him, easily identified by the white "Team Bell" T-shirts and, for a lucky few, the white Bell polo shirts. When Bell takes too much time with a voter, or gets bogged down in a constituent's conversation, one of the white-shirted people will prod him along, or become a literal handler, grabbing him under his arm and pushing him forward.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn and Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1999
City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III fired his chief mayoral campaign consultant yesterday, four days after Bell supporters disrupted an event being held by mayoral rival and fellow Councilman Martin O'Malley.Bell said he never approved the disruption, organized by Julius Henson, and was embarrassed by the incident. "The bottom line is that he was not authorized to speak for the campaign," Bell said yesterday.The change in the upper levels of the Bell campaign came on the same day that mayoral rival Carl F. Stokes lost his campaign manager, and a new voter poll showed Bell's support slipping.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Jamie Stiehm and Gerard Shields and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III, who had considered running for mayor this year, handed a surprise endorsement yesterday to mayoral candidate Carl Stokes.The endorsement occurred as financial reports filed in Annapolis showed City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III with less money than his campaign had initially claimed.Bell filed an amended financial report that showed him with $354,000 going into the final weeks of the race. Last week, the Bell campaign said it had about $400,000.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | August 24, 1999
Let's get this moving again.Lawrence A. Bell III -- LAB, as he's known on his own campaign schedule -- is working Northeast Market on a Saturday morning, shaking hands and repeating, almost mantra-like, "Need your help. Sure need your help. Tell your friends. I'd appreciate your help."His supporters swarm around him, easily identified by the white "Team Bell" T-shirts and, for a lucky few, the white Bell polo shirts. When Bell takes too much time with a voter, or gets bogged down in a constituent's conversation, one of the white-shirted people will prod him along, or become a literal handler, grabbing him under his arm and pushing him forward.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Ivan Penn and Scott Shane and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1999
Evidently seeking a dapper look on the mayoral campaign trail, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III spent $4,323 in campaign contributions on his wardrobe during an April trip to Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City.Bell's shopping trip -- which was legal under state law but drew barbed comments from some political observers -- was part of $475,800 his campaign spent through July 1. He has spent more than twice as much as either of his major rivals, Carl Stokes, who reported spending $200,262, and Martin O'Malley, who said he has spent $153,806, both for seven months.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1999
City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III leads Baltimore's mayoral field in fund raising with $700,000, more than $250,000 above other contenders for the city's top job, officials in his campaign said yesterday.With more than $400,000 remaining, Bell is set to hit airwaves today with a television advertising campaign, said Tammy Hawley, Bell campaign chairwoman.Candidates for city office rushed to complete and file their financial reports with the city and state election boards by the close of business yesterday.
TOPIC
By Richard Shenkman | August 15, 1999
GEORGE W. BUSH is the Eliza Doolittle of American politics. He isn't ready to be president, but with the coaching of a couple of dozen would-be Professor Higginses, he probably can learn to talk like one.You have to admire the man's chutzpah. It takes chutzpah to put yourself forward as a candidate for the presidency after serving just a single term as governor of a state in which the lieutenant governor is the real power. (The lieutenant governor in Texas runs the legislature.)Ah, but this governor has a famous last name.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn and Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1999
City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III fired his chief mayoral campaign consultant yesterday, four days after Bell supporters disrupted an event being held by mayoral rival and fellow Councilman Martin O'Malley.Bell said he never approved the disruption, organized by Julius Henson, and was embarrassed by the incident. "The bottom line is that he was not authorized to speak for the campaign," Bell said yesterday.The change in the upper levels of the Bell campaign came on the same day that mayoral rival Carl F. Stokes lost his campaign manager, and a new voter poll showed Bell's support slipping.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III finished his recent political quest for mayor much the way he began his career for public office 12 years ago -- by borrowing money from his mother.After building a campaign treasury of more than $1.16 million for his mayoral bid, Bell borrowed $5,000 from his mother, Elinor Bell, days after September's primary to pay debts, his latest campaign report shows.His cash balance at the close of the reporting period that ended Oct. 17 was $1,182.40 in his active fund-raising committee account and $1,434.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1997
Westminster's firehouse bell, a landmark and symbol of the city, will remain in its century-old tower overlooking Main Street, thanks to the childhood memories of a councilwoman.Suzanne P. Albert launched a "save the bell" campaign after learning the fire company planned to take the bell to its new headquarters on John Street.Living on Main Street, "walking back and forth as a little kid, if you were under the bell when it struck, it really jarred you," Albert recalled.Thanks to her efforts, the half-ton bell will remain in the firehouse clock tower, which has become a symbol for the city.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 8, 1999
IN PURSUIT OF the mayoralty of Baltimore, in alleged pursuit of what he once called a more civilized, less racially divisive campaign than four years ago, Lawrence Bell allowed his supporters to commit an act of political vandalism last week.They ought to be ashamed of themselves, all of them. For there was Del. Howard P. Rawlings Thursday morning, trying to take part in the democratic process by announcing his support of a candidate not named Lawrence Bell, and he could not raise his voice loud enough to be heard 10 feet away.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
The disruption of mayoral hopeful Martin O'Malley's endorsement ceremony Thursday by supporters of his opponent, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III, drew criticism yesterday from veteran politicians, including one of Bell's aides."
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