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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 1996
Archaeologists digging in northern Belize have found what they think is a royal tomb from the early classic period of the Maya civilization, complete with the skeleton of a man bedecked in a jeweled necklace befitting the ruler of a minor city-state in the fifth century A.D.Specialists welcomed the discovery as a potentially important source of knowledge of Maya royalty. Though tombs thought to be royal are found in Central America every few years, this one is unlike nearly all of the others because it has not been looted.
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FEATURES
By Olivia Hubert-Allen, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
The first signs of cold started to emerge in early October. The leaves of Ginkgo trees blanketed city sidewalks, and a misguided trip out of the house without a jacket drew immediate regret. Brrrr! Sam and I are self-proclaimed wusses when it comes to the cold and we were mourning the fact that another summer was undeniably over. But then, we had a flash of inspiration. Maybe winter wouldn't be so miserable if we had a sun-filled vacation on the horizon; a date we could mark on the calendar in red Sharpie and stare at each cold winter morning as we ate our breakfast in flannel pajamas.
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TRAVEL
By CHRIS JUSTICE and CHRIS JUSTICE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2005
When my wife and I journeyed through Belize, I bought a T-shirt depicting a kaleidoscopic snapshot of underwater treasures, the kind that certifies Belize as an aquatic paradise. On the sleeves was the phrase, "Seeing is Belizing." That T-shirt has gotten many holes since our trip, and my wife has frequently urged me to "get rid of that shirt already!" But I decline, and my refusals are because of the 7-foot nurse shark I almost swam into while snorkeling one evening off Ambergris Caye.
TRAVEL
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 18, 2005
To celebrate the purchase of its 11-acre field station at Blackbird Caye on Belize's Turneffe Atoll, the San Francisco-based Oceanic Society is leading a Jan. 11-18 expedition to Turneffe with marine scientist Sylvia Earle. Divers and snorkelers will explore coral reefs and, with luck, encounter dolphins and manatees in the atoll's interior lagoons. They also will observe some of the island's endangered wildlife. Evening presentations by Earle and other experts will round out each day. Depending on the accommodations selected, snorkelers pay $2,095-$2,250, while scuba divers are charged $2,295-$2,450, including lodging, meals, excursions, programs, airport transfers and local taxes.
FEATURES
By Howard W. French and Howard W. French,New York Times News Service | November 22, 1992
GALLON JUG, Belize -- At the Chan Chich Lodge, a nature resort tucked amid Mayan ruins here in the thick forests of this Central American nation, a handful of affluent Americans bend forward, squinting to detect the movement of birds flitting silently in the moist, all-encompassing green.After repeatedly playing a tape of one bird's call, standing motionless for minutes and chirping expertly himself in vain, Drew Thate, the party's guide, issues a summons to move on."White-breasted wood wren 10, people nothing," he says, drawing a chuckle from the bird watchers, who had each paid thousands of dollars for that frustration, as well as glimpses of exotic birds like the Aracari toucan and masked tityra.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
A tiny boy with black hair and plump cheeks lies sleeping bundled in a blue and white knit wrap, his eyes tightly shut, his small mouth dangling open in the picture Dr. Lee Kleiman took in Belize.The boy, who is no more than 3 months old, would look like any other child if it weren't for a cleft lip, an abnormality that requires surgery to close a rift between his lip and the roof of his mouth.In the United States, that might be a relatively simple proposition. But not in Belize, a Central American country between Mexico and Guatemala that is about the size of New Hampshire.
FEATURES
By Katti Gray | April 14, 1996
I lay there, mummified, wrapped in layers of aluminum foil and steaming, herb-soaked towels. I couldn't move. Not my legs, not my arms, not even a hand to wipe my sweating face.I was prone on a wooden table in a thatched-roof, adobe hut reserved for pampering the bodies that pass through Maruba Resort, a spa in the rain forest of northern Belize.My heart was racing, my blood boiling, thumping in my ears. I fought an urge to freak completely out and demand that Elena Garcia, the young attendant who had bound me, kindly remove the constraints before I suffocated.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 21, 2001
SANTA CRUZ, GUATEMALA - The Ramirez family never was sure where their house was, though they had lived there for 26 years. They are pretty certain it's in Guatemala. Their neighbor and the rifle-toting soldiers are just as certain that it is in Belize. The Ramirezes' land dispute with a neighbor - granted, one in another country - would have been an ordinary feud if it hadn't been for that international border. And those soldiers. Belize's armed forces shot and killed the Ramirez patriarch and his two sons last month in the most serious international incident related to a border conflict that dates back more than 100 years.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
A Howard County man who worked for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for 29 years was among the 17 people on a Virginia diving club trip killed in Belize when their boat capsized Monday night during Hurricane Iris. Raymond Mars, 52, of Scaggsville had joined the Richmond Diving Club a year ago after meeting several members on a dive trip in the Turks and Caicos Islands, said his wife, Teresa Mars. His wife said he wasn't skittish about the diving trip despite last month's terrorist attacks.
FEATURES
By Olivia Hubert-Allen, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
The first signs of cold started to emerge in early October. The leaves of Ginkgo trees blanketed city sidewalks, and a misguided trip out of the house without a jacket drew immediate regret. Brrrr! Sam and I are self-proclaimed wusses when it comes to the cold and we were mourning the fact that another summer was undeniably over. But then, we had a flash of inspiration. Maybe winter wouldn't be so miserable if we had a sun-filled vacation on the horizon; a date we could mark on the calendar in red Sharpie and stare at each cold winter morning as we ate our breakfast in flannel pajamas.
TRAVEL
By CHRIS JUSTICE and CHRIS JUSTICE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2005
When my wife and I journeyed through Belize, I bought a T-shirt depicting a kaleidoscopic snapshot of underwater treasures, the kind that certifies Belize as an aquatic paradise. On the sleeves was the phrase, "Seeing is Belizing." That T-shirt has gotten many holes since our trip, and my wife has frequently urged me to "get rid of that shirt already!" But I decline, and my refusals are because of the 7-foot nurse shark I almost swam into while snorkeling one evening off Ambergris Caye.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | August 18, 2002
A Memorable Place Belize stops the clock and turns it back By Herb Smith San Pedro on Ambergris Cay, Belize. From Baltimore, it takes three flights, so it's not easy to get to. But this island is well worth the trouble. Belize is an increasingly popular destination for ecotourism, and San Pedro is one of its many highlights. Imagine a multiracial and cultural community at peace with itself and protective of the environment. That's San Pedro, a town of about 4,000 people perched on a 25-mile-long island protected by the second longest barrier reef in the world.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 21, 2001
SANTA CRUZ, GUATEMALA - The Ramirez family never was sure where their house was, though they had lived there for 26 years. They are pretty certain it's in Guatemala. Their neighbor and the rifle-toting soldiers are just as certain that it is in Belize. The Ramirezes' land dispute with a neighbor - granted, one in another country - would have been an ordinary feud if it hadn't been for that international border. And those soldiers. Belize's armed forces shot and killed the Ramirez patriarch and his two sons last month in the most serious international incident related to a border conflict that dates back more than 100 years.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
A Howard County man who worked for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for 29 years was among the 17 people on a Virginia diving club trip killed in Belize when their boat capsized Monday night during Hurricane Iris. Raymond Mars, 52, of Scaggsville had joined the Richmond Diving Club a year ago after meeting several members on a dive trip in the Turks and Caicos Islands, said his wife, Teresa Mars. His wife said he wasn't skittish about the diving trip despite last month's terrorist attacks.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
He was born in the Central American nation of Belize and spent the first five years of his young life in less than ideal conditions."I don't remember much about it," said Navy sophomore fullback Raheem Lambert. "I went back at Christmas in 1993 and found North Belize to be industrialized and South Belize to be third world, outhouses and all."I was born in the South. But I do remember the beautiful seas."The seas have since calmed for Lambert, who moved to Riverside, Calif., and developed into a high school All-American as a running back at Norte Vista High School.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1998
A popular Cecil County science teacher vacationing in Central America with his wife and son was slain by robbers Sunday night.Raymond M. Kirk, 47, of Chesapeake City was shot by one of three men who arrived at a small Belize resort by boat, consumed a meal, then held up the patrons. Kirk, who was in a cabana adjacent to the dining area, was murdered as he drew a knife to protect his wife, Diane "Beth" Kirk, 47, and 11-year-old son, Sean.Kirk, who arranged the vacation to see rain forests, tropical vegetation and fish, was known as a teacher who animated his North East Middle School classroom with his personality and live reptile exhibits.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1998
A popular Cecil County science teacher vacationing in Central America with his wife and son was slain by robbers Sunday night.Raymond M. Kirk, 47, of Chesapeake City was shot by one of three men who arrived at a small Belize resort by boat, consumed a meal, then held up the patrons. Kirk, who was in a cabana adjacent to the dining area, was murdered as he drew a knife to protect his wife, Diane "Beth" Kirk, 47, and 11-year-old son, Sean.Kirk, who arranged the vacation to see rain forests, tropical vegetation and fish, was known as a teacher who animated his North East Middle School classroom with his personality and live reptile exhibits.
FEATURES
By Ginger Dingus and Ginger Dingus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1996
You have got to love a country where they name their towns Gallon Jug, Doublehead Cabbage and Never Delay, and where they call the flowers "hot lips," "Polly redhead" and "stinking toe."Add the world's second largest barrier reef, lush rain forests teeming with exotic flora and fauna and a generous share of ancient Mayan ruins to that easygoing sense of humor.It's no wonder active travelers are putting Belize at the top of their "must see" lists.Belize, formerly British Honduras and now a member of the British Commonwealth, is on the Caribbean, or east, coast of the Yucatan peninsula.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1997
They encountered crocodiles, tarantulas and omnipresent mosquitoes; endured blistering heat and torrential rains and swam, sometimes quite by accident, in tropical waters.But the Belize Boys consider their "walk on the wild side" last June an adventure and an education well worth repeating.The six, now freshmen at Liberty High School, spent their last semester at Oklahoma Road Middle School planning a trip to Belize and Guatemala. They are planning this year for a return trip to Central America.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1997
A few South Carroll students will embark on an educational journey to Central America this week, vacationing among jaguars, iguanas, baboons, coral reefs and rain forests.They have dubbed their educational trip to Belize and Guatemala "Take a Walk on the Wild Side," a slogan they have lTC printed on their sienna T-shirts, along with pictures of hairy spiders and a large green iguana.Group members will carry only what a knapsack can hold and will take copious notes and attend class every night with their eighth-grade science teacher and trip organizer Jason Petula.
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