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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff XHC VfB | May 22, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS -- Gentlemen, open your checkbooks.That's how NFL owners should have begun league meetings today that are expected to provide formal approval to a $l two-team expansion in 1994.The meetings didn't start that way, of course. But it would have been appropriate because representatives from would-be expansion cities began arriving here last night for this two-day exercise in glad-handing.For the first time since their 1974 decision to expand, the NFL owners are treating the subject seriously.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Donald A. Krach, former general counsel for the Maryland Port Administration who was an advocate and goodwill ambassador for the port of Baltimore, died May 4 of complications from pancreatic cancer at his Timonium home. He was 80. "Don was a real cheerleader for our port, and he really worked hard with our clients to put more business through here," said James J. White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration. "He had such a big personality. " "Don was one of those attorneys who came up through the state system, and he was absolutely enthusiastic about the port.
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SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and John W. Frece and Mark Hyman and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writers | February 4, 1995
John Moag Jr., a Baltimore lawyer and lobbyist, is Gov. Parris Glendening's choice to become chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, according to administration sources.In an unrelated development, the Stadium Authority said the Orioles paid rent of $3.7 million for the 1994 season, despite a players' strike that canceled the final 25 games at Camden Yards.Moag is managing partner of the Baltimore law office of Patton, Boggs & Blow. Another of the firm's lawyers is former Gov. Harry Hughes, a political ally of Glendening.
NEWS
By ALISSA J. RUBIN and ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIME | March 19, 2006
POZAREVAC, Serbia and Montenegro -- Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was buried in his hometown yesterday on a day that had the air of a political rally, with fervent crowds chanting his nickname, "Slobo," as though he were still their leader. Although more than 60,000 defiant supporters had gathered in the capital, Belgrade, earlier in the day to commemorate the former president, the burial service here in a small central Serbian town was low-key and oddly devoid of emotion.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | December 7, 1993
Maryland, which lost its NFL team to a midnight flight, will not try to lure the Redskins from Washington unless the city and team fail to resolve their differences on a new stadium project, according to Maryland Stadium Authority chairman Herbert J. Belgrad."
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Building a football stadium in downtown Baltimore may cost $20 million more than originally thought, but the state should continue seeking an NFL team and has been contacted by some interested franchises, Maryland Stadium Authority chairman Herbert J. Belgrad said yesterday.Belgrad, appearing before the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee in Annapolis, said he has been told by prospective ownership groups seeking a team for Baltimore that they are in contact with three teams.Orioles owner Peter Angelos is "actively engaged" with three teams that have contacted him, and Robert Schulman, an attorney representing a group that includes former Denver Bronco Floyd Little, is talking with two teams, Belgrad testified.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
Herbert J. Belgrad, chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, met with Los Angeles Rams officials in New York yesterday, Channel 2 reported last night.The Rams confirmed that John Shaw, the club's executive vice president, was in New York on NFL business. The Rams are exploring the possibility of a move, and Shaw has expressed interest in Baltimore.Earlier yesterday, Gov. William Donald Schaefer, asked if there was anything new about football, told a news conference, "I can give you a better answer tomorrow."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Don't expect to hear "Hail to the Redskins" being played at Memorial Stadium any time soon.That's the word from Herbert J. Belgrad, the chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, who hasn't heard from the Washington Redskins and doesn't expect to soon.Belgrad brushed off a report in The Washington Post yesterday that the Redskins are considering playing at Memorial Stadium because they're having trouble reaching terms on a new lease agreement at RFK Stadium in Washington."The bottom line is not only has there been no contact [with the Redskins]
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | May 23, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS -- The expansion hopefuls lined up like pitchmen at a carnival yesterday.Arthur "Chick" Sherrer bragged that Jacksonville could issue game-day checks for more than $1 million each to visiting NFL teams at the Gator Bowl.Mark Richardson drew a circle around Charlotte, N.C., and pulled out numbers that show real regional drawing power for a Carolina team.Not to be outdone, Herb Belgrad pulled numbers out of his head that said Baltimore has the highest median household income of any prospective expansion city.
NEWS
March 29, 1992
Herbert J. Belgrad has no trouble recalling the moment when Gov. Harry Hughes asked him to consider serving as oe of the charter members of the Maryland Stadium Authority.It was June 1986. It was in the governor's State House office. And, for Belgrad, a Baltimore lawyer with little knowledge of professional sports, it was a slightly unbelievable moment."In the first place, I wasn't even familiar with the legislation [creating the authority]," Belgrad recalled. "And second, as I stated then, there were any number of highly qualified persons with an interest in sports who would have given their right arms to serve the state in that capacity."
NEWS
December 31, 2003
WE'RE GOING to be hearing a lot more from the Balkans in 2004, and the news won't be good. Throughout the old Yugoslavia, voters are tiring of liberal reformers and returning seemingly discredited nationalists to power. It happened in Bosnia this fall, then in Croatia, and, on Sunday, in Serbia itself -- the Ground Zero of trouble in Southeastern Europe. The party that made the best showing in Serbia's parliamentary elections was one led by the gruesome Vojislav Seselj, currently residing in a prison cell in The Hague, where he is a war crimes defendant.
NEWS
October 8, 2002
THE UNITED STATES is quietly trying to buy votes in Serbia, which may or may not be electing a new president this Sunday. It could easily backfire, since the candidate most closely attuned to Western ways of thinking is likely to fail badly. But a bigger problem is that both candidates might fail - if turnout is less than 50 percent, the election is annulled, and the Balkans' most dangerous country enters uncharted territory. Last week Washington agreed to write off two-thirds of Yugoslavia's debt, and this week Congress takes up a bill normalizing trade relations.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 16, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Every war has a hotel. In Saigon, it was the Continental-Palace, a graceful colonial building famed for the "Continental Shelf," a veranda bar that was the meeting place for journalists and the military. In Beirut, it was the Commodore, which featured a parrot that could imitate incoming artillery rounds and telex machines that never broke down. In Baghdad it was the Al-Rashid with a mosaic of former President George Bush that you had to step on to get into the lobby.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 2, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was ordered detained for 30 days by an investigative judge yesterday as the disgraced dictator faced Serbian justice and a spell in a Belgrade jail after his pre-dawn surrender. The man who vowed that he wouldn't be arrested alive during a tense two-day standoff with authorities pleaded not guilty to local corruption and abuse-of-power charges and began adjusting to life in his new surroundings. In a separate wing of the factory-like, four-story central prison, Milosevic has no television, no radio and no workout equipment, his attorney said.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2000
The day after her baby's outpatient operation, Tanya Simeunovic confers with Dr. Eugene de Juan Jr., the soft-spoken co-director of the retinal surgery department at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. Simeunovic's English is scanty, but she doesn't hesitate to use it on behalf of Ilija, born two months early. He has a condition called retinopathy of prematurity that would leave him blind without proper medical intervention. "Everything went very well," de Juan tells her, as 7-month-old Ilija whimpers and husband Zoran holds the baby's placid twin brother, Aleksa, who has no visual loss.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and By Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2000
BEIJING - The lessons of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's ouster last week were clear to much of the world: A brutal dictatorship based on fear and hatred cannot last. But China's leaders, who lionized Milosevic during last year's war in Kosovo, are almost certain to have drawn different lessons from the dictator's defeat: Don't tolerate opposition parties, and don't permit national elections. Instead of encouraging political reform in one of the world's last major authoritarian countries, the events in Belgrade may further harden Communist Party opposition to liberal democracy, analysts say. "The Milosevic affair ... plays squarely into the hands of hard-liners in Beijing, who greatly fear any relaxation of political control," says Richard Baum, a professor of political science at the University of California at Los Angeles.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | March 16, 1991
Herbert Belgrad, chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, said yesterday that he hasn't been contacted by Victor Kiam, the owner of the New England Patriots who told Massachusetts officials Thursday that he may move the team if he doesn't get a new stadium in the Boston area.Belgrad declined to comment when asked whether Kiam had contacted anyone in Baltimore.Stephen Tocco, a special assistant to Massachusetts Gov. William Weld, said Kiam met for a half-hour Thursday with Weld and Boston Mayor Raymond L. Flynn and outlined some of his options, which included moving to Rhode Island, Baltimore or one of the several cities being considered for an National Football League expansion franchise.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and By Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2000
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Last year, Zorica Trikic and her teen-age daughter, Tamara, had a ringside seat to an air war. Night after night, they watched in fear from their eighth-floor apartment balcony as NATO bombs laid waste to elephant gray government buildings that served as the nerve centers for Slobodan Milosevic's Yugoslavia. On Thursday, mother and daughter were back on the balcony, watching with a mixture of excitement and trepidation as black smoke billowed from the burning Federal Parliament building.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 28, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Vojislav Kostunica, the lawyer backed by the United States and Europe to take over the presidency of Yugoslavia, opposed communist dictator Tito in the 1970s and as a law professor oversaw the translation of the American Federalist Papers into Serbo-Croatian. He has also provocatively posed in Kosovo with a rifle to assert Serbia's claim to the province, has backed indicted Serbian war criminal Radovan Karadzic and been quoted as excusing the 1995 massacre of 7,000 Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica as an "act of self-defense" by Serbs.
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