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Belgian Endive

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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 8, 1992
Belgian endive is a vegetable with an identity crisis: It is not especially Belgian, and it is not the same as the salad green called endive, though they belong to the same botanical family, that of the dandelion. Belgian endive is called witloof chicory, which perhaps is what led it to change its name.In addition, it is not something that springs up in the garden as you see it in stores: It must be forced and blanched. The roots are dug up, cooled, planted deep in containers, kept in a cool room or basement and watered sparingly.
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By Beth Fortune and Beth Fortune,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 2006
Look at the wildly tangled leaves of curly endive, the furiously jagged edges of dandelion greens, the deep furls of escarole and right off you know there's something about them that's just begging to be tamed. It's a bit of a paradox. These greens are loved for their bitter bite, but harnessing that bite - say, by adding the spice of chiles or the sweetness of bacon or by giving them a quick blanch or even just a saute - is what makes them sing. And at this time of year, bitter greens are calling from nearly every other stall or stand at the farmers' market or the grocery store; they're a boon of winter.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
While walking through the produce section of a neighborhood market several days ago, I spotted a large display of Belgian endive. In season throughout the cold-weather months, the white and pale green bulbs were a bargain, so I picked up a bagful and tossed them into my cart. Typically I slice endive and add it to mixed-green salads for a slightly bitter accent. Or I mound the leaves with blue cheese and toasted walnuts and offer them as appetizers. This time I decided to cook the endive.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 25, 2006
Long ago, when I went to France as a college student for a year of study, I discovered that a salad could be more than a wedge of iceberg topped with store-bought dressing. I consumed platefuls of mixed greens lightly coated with bracing vinaigrettes, and savored bowls of delectable composed salads that featured a variety of well-paired ingredients. The French, I observed, were masters of la salade. Simple salads -- those made with greens and vinaigrette -- were used as a transition between the main course and dessert, while composed salads usually began a dinner or anchored a light lunch or supper.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 16, 2000
More often than not, a trip to the market provides me with inspiration for a new dish. Last week, for example, while walking down the aisles of the produce section in a local market, I spotted some plump Belgian endive. They were so attractive that I put several in my cart along with a bouquet of fresh dill. Moving on to the fish counter, I found beautiful boned salmon steaks. I added the seafood to my cache. At home, I decided to pair the salmon with the endive. I sliced and sauteed the Belgian endive until golden brown and slightly caramelized, then transferred the vegetable to a baking dish.
FEATURES
By Karla Cook and Karla Cook,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1994
The navel orange is one step from the tangerine -- in the peel department, anyway.What other type of orange can be accessed so easily? And seedless to boot! And though its taste isn't as intense as the fragile tangerine, it's a worthy splash of flavor that carries us through these lingering days of the cold and flu season.The vitamin-packed orange also offers some protection for those prone to cataracts, according to one U.S. Department of Agriculture study. Researcher Paul Jacques found that people with little vitamin C in their blood were 11 times more likely to have a certain type of cataract, writes Jean Carper in "Food -- Your Miracle Medicine" (HarperCollins, $25)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
As with many of life's endeavors, picnics benefit from a bit of planning. Unlike more tedious activities, however, planning a picnic pays off in more leisure and more fun for the providers of the feast.Among the recipes suggested here, the pasta salad and pie can be prepared ahead of time. The endive rolls require last-minute preparation.Belgian endive, blue cheese, walnut rollsServes 10-12.3 to 4 Belgian endive8 ounces cream cheese, softened4 ounces blue cheese crumbs1/2 cup chopped walnutsMix cream cheese, blue cheese and walnuts.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 30, 2000
Long before there were climate-controlled crispers, the root cellar kept the kitchen supplied with fresh vegetables during the cold months. Carrots, beets and other edible roots are still good keepers, staying crisp and sweet for weeks if properly stored. Shredded or diced for salads, their fresh color and flavor brighten winter meals. In this recipe, the earthy sweetness of the beets balances the slight bitterness of the endive and the tang of the vinaigrette. This dressing is thicker than most vinaigrettes.
NEWS
April 17, 2002
Iceberg: pale green and crisp, not as flavorful as other varieties Romaine: also known as cos, tastes slightly nutty and sweet Mizuna: pungent Japanese green that is a relative of the mustard family Bibb lettuce: also known as limestone, butter or Boston lettuce, has subtly sweet leaves Leaf lettuces: have frilled or crumpled edges; may be all green or bordered in red or brownish red. Oak-leaf lettuce is one example. Arugula: also called rocket cress or roquette, has dark green, notched leaves and a sharp peppery flavor Dandelion: long, slender indented leaves, prized for their tart taste Watercress: grows in shallow moving water and tastes peppery Bitter chicory: a number of greens fall within category, including Belgian endive, which has cream-colored leaves, tinged with green at the top, and a bitter taste.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 25, 2006
Long ago, when I went to France as a college student for a year of study, I discovered that a salad could be more than a wedge of iceberg topped with store-bought dressing. I consumed platefuls of mixed greens lightly coated with bracing vinaigrettes, and savored bowls of delectable composed salads that featured a variety of well-paired ingredients. The French, I observed, were masters of la salade. Simple salads -- those made with greens and vinaigrette -- were used as a transition between the main course and dessert, while composed salads usually began a dinner or anchored a light lunch or supper.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
While walking through the produce section of a neighborhood market several days ago, I spotted a large display of Belgian endive. In season throughout the cold-weather months, the white and pale green bulbs were a bargain, so I picked up a bagful and tossed them into my cart. Typically I slice endive and add it to mixed-green salads for a slightly bitter accent. Or I mound the leaves with blue cheese and toasted walnuts and offer them as appetizers. This time I decided to cook the endive.
NEWS
April 17, 2002
Iceberg: pale green and crisp, not as flavorful as other varieties Romaine: also known as cos, tastes slightly nutty and sweet Mizuna: pungent Japanese green that is a relative of the mustard family Bibb lettuce: also known as limestone, butter or Boston lettuce, has subtly sweet leaves Leaf lettuces: have frilled or crumpled edges; may be all green or bordered in red or brownish red. Oak-leaf lettuce is one example. Arugula: also called rocket cress or roquette, has dark green, notched leaves and a sharp peppery flavor Dandelion: long, slender indented leaves, prized for their tart taste Watercress: grows in shallow moving water and tastes peppery Bitter chicory: a number of greens fall within category, including Belgian endive, which has cream-colored leaves, tinged with green at the top, and a bitter taste.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 16, 2000
More often than not, a trip to the market provides me with inspiration for a new dish. Last week, for example, while walking down the aisles of the produce section in a local market, I spotted some plump Belgian endive. They were so attractive that I put several in my cart along with a bouquet of fresh dill. Moving on to the fish counter, I found beautiful boned salmon steaks. I added the seafood to my cache. At home, I decided to pair the salmon with the endive. I sliced and sauteed the Belgian endive until golden brown and slightly caramelized, then transferred the vegetable to a baking dish.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 30, 2000
Long before there were climate-controlled crispers, the root cellar kept the kitchen supplied with fresh vegetables during the cold months. Carrots, beets and other edible roots are still good keepers, staying crisp and sweet for weeks if properly stored. Shredded or diced for salads, their fresh color and flavor brighten winter meals. In this recipe, the earthy sweetness of the beets balances the slight bitterness of the endive and the tang of the vinaigrette. This dressing is thicker than most vinaigrettes.
FEATURES
By Karla Cook and Karla Cook,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1994
The navel orange is one step from the tangerine -- in the peel department, anyway.What other type of orange can be accessed so easily? And seedless to boot! And though its taste isn't as intense as the fragile tangerine, it's a worthy splash of flavor that carries us through these lingering days of the cold and flu season.The vitamin-packed orange also offers some protection for those prone to cataracts, according to one U.S. Department of Agriculture study. Researcher Paul Jacques found that people with little vitamin C in their blood were 11 times more likely to have a certain type of cataract, writes Jean Carper in "Food -- Your Miracle Medicine" (HarperCollins, $25)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
As with many of life's endeavors, picnics benefit from a bit of planning. Unlike more tedious activities, however, planning a picnic pays off in more leisure and more fun for the providers of the feast.Among the recipes suggested here, the pasta salad and pie can be prepared ahead of time. The endive rolls require last-minute preparation.Belgian endive, blue cheese, walnut rollsServes 10-12.3 to 4 Belgian endive8 ounces cream cheese, softened4 ounces blue cheese crumbs1/2 cup chopped walnutsMix cream cheese, blue cheese and walnuts.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 8, 1992
Belgian endive is a vegetable with an identity crisis: It is not especially Belgian, and it is not the same as the salad green called endive, though they belong to the same botanical family, that of the dandelion. Belgian endive is called witloof chicory, which perhaps is what led it to change its name.In addition, it is not something that springs up in the garden as you see it in stores: It must be forced and blanched. The roots are dug up, cooled, planted deep in containers, kept in a cool room or basement and watered sparingly.
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