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NEWS
March 22, 2006
President Bush was going on again yesterday about success in Iraq; three years into the war, it is, no doubt, a little unrealistic to expect him to suddenly start coming to terms with reality. Polls suggest that most Americans have learned to tune him out, which may be a healthy reaction for the individual but doesn't bode well for the nation. For three years, the president has talked about progress, and yet the future of Iraq looks darker now than ever before. And it's not just Iraq; it seems the obliviousness is spreading.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | January 28, 1994
MINSK, Belarus -- This tiny republic, which has walked so unsteadily on the path to sovereignty since the breakup of the Soviet Union that it still hasn't managed to come up with its own national anthem, now is willingly sliding back under Russia's wing.A decisive act in that course occurred this week when the old guard, stung by Belarus' role in the breakup of the Soviet Union, threw out the man determined to stay the course on independence from Moscow.Having waited patiently for two years they got rid of President Stanislav Shushkevich, who had tried to push for some sort of economic reform, but, even more damningly, had been one of the three founders of the Commonwealth of Independent States, back in December 1991, which spelled the end of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 18, 2011
Dr. Faina Nagel, a dentist who practiced in Columbia and had earlier lived in Leningrad and Israel, died of stomach cancer March 9 at her Howard County home. She was 54. Born Faina Okun in Belarus, she grew up in Leningrad and attended the Leningrad Pediatric Institute. Her father, a physics teacher, suffered the loss of his family, who were Jews, during World War II. Her mother was a store manager. As a teen, she was a member of the Young Communist Party. Family members said she encountered anti-Semitism and left the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 20, 2006
MINSK, Belarus -- Thousands of demonstrators gathered here last night even as President Alexander Lukashenko seemed assured of an overwhelming re-election victory, as unofficial results showed him receiving more than 80 percent of the vote and his nearest competitor about 2 percent. Supporters of the main opposition candidate, Alexander Milinkevich, dismissed those figures, pointing to different polling data that indicated Lukashenko had failed to receive the 50 percent necessary to avoid a runoff.
NEWS
By LIONEL BEEHNER | April 13, 2006
Belarus is ripe for democracy. Despite the weeklong protests and round-the-clock vigils that ended in mass arrests recently, hope is not lost. Nor is the next opportunity to usher in democratic change in five years, when Alexander Lukashenko, Europe's last dictator, is expected to seek a fourth term. Opposition groups are saying privately that Mr. Lukashenko' grip on power has been weakened. With the right mixture of carrots and sticks from the West, and a little nudging from Moscow, his power will only further erode and Belarus will end its self-isolation, democratize and integrate into Europe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2006
MOSCOW -- The European Union imposed a freeze yesterday on bank accounts and other financial assets of President Alexander Lukashenko and 35 other senior officials in Belarus, along with their families or proxies, in retaliation for a rigged presidential election in March and the crackdown on government opponents that has continued in its aftermath. The freeze follows a ban on travel to the EU's 25 member states; the United States also officially imposed a travel ban earlier this week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
Andrei Nikoliovitch Slesarev, 9, has spent all his growing years in the shadow of Chernobyl, the world's worst nuclear accident. The resulting pollution has taken its toll, leaving him underweight, with poor teeth and eyesight.Andrei has gained 10 pounds since he arrived in Annandale, Va., on June 17 for a six-week visit with Ann L. Gates and her family, but he still has room to grow before a child's size 7 clothing will be a good fit.During his stay in Annandale, the boy and his host family studied music and peace lessons at Common Ground, a 10-day multicultural arts program at Western Maryland College in Westminster.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | July 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The White House laid out a showy welcome mat this week for a portly, voluble physicist named Stanislav Shushkevich and clearly hoped that some of his neighbors were watching.Mr. Shushkevich is parliamentary chairman and head of state of Belarus, the former Soviet republic that is now cooperating completely with the U.S. goal of making sure that all nuclear weapons are removed from former Soviet territory except bTC Russia.Belarus' anti-nuclear stance is born of experience. A victim of Chernobyl radioactive fallout, it is now coping with a legacy of increased thyroid diseases and leukemia.
NEWS
September 11, 2001
BELARUS IS a small country with big problems. Among them is its tyrannical President Alexander Lukashenko, who just won a rigged election. In six years, the former collective farm director has turned Belarus into Europe's most repressive country. Opposition newspapers are banned; government critics silenced. Stalinist economic ideas and the secret police rule. However insignificant this backward nation may appear, it is a potential troublemaker as one source of arms for Saddam Hussein and other international pariahs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | April 28, 2007
Alevtina "Alina" Zhilina came to the United States in 1996 from Belarus in eastern Europe, where her parents still live. The 40-year-old woman was described as a quiet, private person who liked to read, wanted to work nights and sometimes walked about three miles to her job at the Columbia 7-Eleven where she was fatally shot early Thursday. Howard County police were searching yesterday for a man seen running from the convenience store in the 5700 block of Columbia Road in Running Brook just after the 3:10 a.m. shooting.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Russian-Belarusian oil dispute that has shut down a key pipeline carrying crude oil to European customers might drag on long enough to force Russia to cut production, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday. The bitter spat between the longtime allies led to a cutoff Monday in the flow of oil across Belarus, prompting complaints from European officials. A warm winter has left Europe with abundant oil supplies, triggering falling prices and keeping a lid on the severity of the continent's short-term worries about the cutoff.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICOGO TRIBUNE | January 9, 2007
MOSCOW -- Russia halted oil supplies sent to Germany and Poland via Belarus yesterday, as an escalating trade feud between Minsk and Moscow renewed Europe's concerns about over-dependence on Russian energy. Moscow had to shut off oil supplies sent to Europe through the Friendship pipeline in Belarus, after it discovered Belarus had siphoned 79,000 tons of Russian oil, according to officials with Russia's Trade and Economic Development Ministry and the country's state-owned pipeline enterprise, Transneft.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2006
MOSCOW -- Russia and Belarus traded bitter words yesterday in a dispute over natural gas prices that threatened to damage relations between the longtime allies and disrupt supplies to other European countries. The Russian state-controlled gas monopoly Gazprom reiterated a threat to cut off natural gas for Belarus on Monday if no agreement on price is reached by then, and it accused Belarus of planning to steal gas intended for European Union states by tapping into pipelines carrying Russian gas west.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
There are inebriated people everywhere. You cannot say they are drunk, insofar as they are not lying under a fence, but there are a lot of people under the influence."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2006
MOSCOW -- The European Union imposed a freeze yesterday on bank accounts and other financial assets of President Alexander Lukashenko and 35 other senior officials in Belarus, along with their families or proxies, in retaliation for a rigged presidential election in March and the crackdown on government opponents that has continued in its aftermath. The freeze follows a ban on travel to the EU's 25 member states; the United States also officially imposed a travel ban earlier this week.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICOGO TRIBUNE | January 9, 2007
MOSCOW -- Russia halted oil supplies sent to Germany and Poland via Belarus yesterday, as an escalating trade feud between Minsk and Moscow renewed Europe's concerns about over-dependence on Russian energy. Moscow had to shut off oil supplies sent to Europe through the Friendship pipeline in Belarus, after it discovered Belarus had siphoned 79,000 tons of Russian oil, according to officials with Russia's Trade and Economic Development Ministry and the country's state-owned pipeline enterprise, Transneft.
NEWS
November 23, 1996
NOTHING IN Belarus is as easy as it seems. A deal to defuse a political confrontation between authoritarian President Alexander Lukashenko and the country's parliament began unraveling almost as soon as it was struck yesterday.Under the deal, brokered by Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, the parliament is to agree not to seek Mr. Lukashenko's impeachment. For his part, the president, who wanted to acquire nearly dictatorial powers and extend his term until the year 2001 through a referendum tomorrow, has pledged to regard the results as non-binding.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
MOSCOW -- The opposition politician who last month led protests against the re-election victory of President Aleksandr G. Lukashenko of Belarus was ordered jailed yesterday a day after denouncing the president at a rally in the Belarusian capital. A court in Minsk ordered that Aleksandr Milinkevich serve 15 days in prison for participating in what it deemed an unsanctioned rally during which he called for Lukashenko's impeachment and vowed to "depose this regime" through peaceful protests.
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