Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBelafonte
IN THE NEWS

Belafonte

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A red-faced state trooper hardly acknowledged Harry Belafonte before a 1967 performance at the University of Baltimore during heat of the civil rights movement. After the show, part of a tour with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., an envelope from the trooper awaited the famous black calypso singer and activist at the front desk of the fieldhouse. Inside were six bullets and a letter. "After having met and heard Dr. King and you, I will never fire a weapon ever again," Belafonte said the trooper wrote.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A red-faced state trooper hardly acknowledged Harry Belafonte before a 1967 performance at the University of Baltimore during heat of the civil rights movement. After the show, part of a tour with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., an envelope from the trooper awaited the famous black calypso singer and activist at the front desk of the fieldhouse. Inside were six bullets and a letter. "After having met and heard Dr. King and you, I will never fire a weapon ever again," Belafonte said the trooper wrote.
Advertisement
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 23, 2006
I knew, before I did it, that if I did it, I'd hate myself in the morning. As it turns out, I hated myself the rest of the week. I caught Harry Belafonte's speech Tuesday night at the Johns Hopkins University. I went expecting to hear the same Belafonte who tried to channel the spirit of Malcolm X four years ago when he compared then-Secretary of State Colin Powell to a house slave. (Note to Harry: There was only one Malcolm X. And he's dead.) Or at least the Belafonte of early 2006, who was in Venezuela telling President Hugo Chavez that President Bush was the "biggest tyrant" and the "biggest terrorist" in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2011
One measure of a great biography is that you start into it thinking you know the subject. and by the end of it, you admit to yourself that you knew only the tip of the iceberg. "Sing Your Song," n HBO documentary film on the life and word of Harry Belafonte premiering at 10 p.m. Monday is a great biography in just that way. Yes, he's the guy who sang "Banana Boat (Day-O)" in the 1950s, and has a huge seller of an album (back when people still knew what record album and LP meant)
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | October 16, 2002
DAAYY-OH! DAY-AY-AY-AY-OH! MY FOOT IN ME MOUTH AND I WAN' GO HOME! Might make a great new theme song for singer-actor-left wing loudmouth Harry Belafonte, no? Most of you have probably heard the story by now, but here's a refresher for those of you who haven't. About a week ago, Belafonte went on a San Diego radio show and excoriated Secretary of State Colin Powell, who, like Belafonte, is a Jamaican-American who achieved success through hard work and dedication. Did Belafonte chastise Powell for his beliefs?
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1998
The voice sounds weary, but, after all, it's 10: 30 p.m.long-time fans and bring in new, younger ones. "Most of the music is African- and Caribbean-influenced," he says. "That is music that people are becoming more attuned to."He is busy co-producing "Parting the Waters" for television, adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Taylor Branch that chronicles America's civil rights movement."We are madly pulling together all of the different aspects of that," he says. "It will be a miniseries, eight hours, or maybe 12 hours.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 16, 1993
The legendary singer Harry Belafonte is the star attraction at this week's SuperPops Series at the Meyerhoff. (All four concerts are sold out, which doesn't surprise anyone who ever heard him sing "Day-O.")The 66-year-old Belafonte, still very handsome, arrived Wednesday in time to attend a reception at Spike & Charlie's Restaurant and Wine Bar for 50 of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's most generous supporters.He graciously autographed old albums and posed for pictures for all who asked.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 13, 1998
Harry Belafonte received the first lifetime achievement award at the Heritage Shadows of a Silver Screen black film museum and cinema last Saturday.At an invitation-only brunch, Belafonte spoke to the crowd of nearly 100 people for more than an hour, reminiscing about growing up the son of a single mother in Harlem; his service in World War II, after which he returned to "business as usual" of racism and segregation in the United States; and his coming under...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 1, 2002
Tonight at 7:30, in the recently upgraded Graham Auditorium (the sound system has been thoroughly revamped), the Walters Art Museum kicks off its new film series, "Walters Live: At the Movies," with a rare CinemaScope screening of the sizzling 1954 hit Carmen Jones, a blend of Bizet's Carmen, American musical comedy and film noir. When Dorothy Dandridge sashays on screen in the title role, a sneering co-worker calls her a "hip-swinging floozy." Actually, she swings every part of her body.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 1, 1995
As either a "Twilight Zone" episode or a civics lesson, "White Man's Burden" would be intriguing; as a feature movie, it goes on too long and makes its points over and over again.It's the reversal business, neatly imagined by screenwriter-director Desmond Nakano. He postulates an America exactly as the one we live in today, with the not-so-subtle difference that the powerful majority is black and the powerless minority white. Otherwise, the same network of racism and the same network of stereotyping exist.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 23, 2006
I knew, before I did it, that if I did it, I'd hate myself in the morning. As it turns out, I hated myself the rest of the week. I caught Harry Belafonte's speech Tuesday night at the Johns Hopkins University. I went expecting to hear the same Belafonte who tried to channel the spirit of Malcolm X four years ago when he compared then-Secretary of State Colin Powell to a house slave. (Note to Harry: There was only one Malcolm X. And he's dead.) Or at least the Belafonte of early 2006, who was in Venezuela telling President Hugo Chavez that President Bush was the "biggest tyrant" and the "biggest terrorist" in the world.
FEATURES
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
Harry Belafonte's speaking voice has always had a touch of hoarseness, but now, at 79, he sounds like an old New York cabbie who just completed a 10-K run -- uphill. His rasp is more amplified, and with every sentence, it appears he's about to run out of breath. Yet the legendary entertainer and civil rights activist, who is speaking Sunday at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church in Bolton Hill, scarcely has trouble being understood, particularly in recent years, when he has loudly opposed the war in Iraq and the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 25, 2002
WASHINGTON -- There's more than one sniper in the news these days. Calling Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice "house slaves" on President Bush's plantation has brought Harry Belafonte more publicity than he's had since his "The Banana Boat Song" roared up the charts in 1957. This time he did not sing, "Day-O!" But a lot of the rest of us say, "Oh, no!" As a liberal political activist, Mr. Belafonte has taken on many worthy causes over the years, but, alas, this time he missed the banana boat.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | October 16, 2002
DAAYY-OH! DAY-AY-AY-AY-OH! MY FOOT IN ME MOUTH AND I WAN' GO HOME! Might make a great new theme song for singer-actor-left wing loudmouth Harry Belafonte, no? Most of you have probably heard the story by now, but here's a refresher for those of you who haven't. About a week ago, Belafonte went on a San Diego radio show and excoriated Secretary of State Colin Powell, who, like Belafonte, is a Jamaican-American who achieved success through hard work and dedication. Did Belafonte chastise Powell for his beliefs?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 1, 2002
Tonight at 7:30, in the recently upgraded Graham Auditorium (the sound system has been thoroughly revamped), the Walters Art Museum kicks off its new film series, "Walters Live: At the Movies," with a rare CinemaScope screening of the sizzling 1954 hit Carmen Jones, a blend of Bizet's Carmen, American musical comedy and film noir. When Dorothy Dandridge sashays on screen in the title role, a sneering co-worker calls her a "hip-swinging floozy." Actually, she swings every part of her body.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | March 4, 2001
When Diane Becker, the director of the Center for Health Promotion at the Johns Hopkins University, sat down to dinner last month with Harry Belafonte and his wife, Julie, among others, she knew she and the couple shared similar social convictions, but she soon found out they also shared something else: an obsessive love of shoes. "Everybody else thought we were totally bizarre," says Becker, 57, a woman who actually chose to move, in large part, because she was out of closet space. "We discussed how Mrs. Belafonte puts her shoes in a large array on the closet floor and how mine are all in boxes and sorted by the size of the heel and colors of the fabric."
FEATURES
By Robyn L. Davis and Robyn L. Davis,Staff Writer | August 24, 1993
Someday Prince may call. Maybe even The King.At least, WGRX-FM hopes so.The station is giving away $1,000 to the listener who can convince the "biggest" star to call in and chat with the morning disc jockeys, Dave Marcum and Jack Taylor.Sportscaster Jim McKay called last Wednesday, followed directly by Grant Shaud of "Murphy Brown." So far they're the best-known of the 17 local or national celebrities to phone in during the three-week promotion that ends Thursday.Local big shots who've called include Bert Jones, former quarterback for the Baltimore Colts, who called from Louisiana where he now runs a lumber mill, and Marty Bass, who does news for WJZ-TV 13.Early last Friday, Shari Belafonte, star of "Hotel" and Slim Fast commercials, rose from sleep at her sister-in-law's urging and gamely tried for 20 minutes before getting through, she told the DJs after finally getting on the air.The station has the sister-in-law's name but doesn't know where she lives or how to get in touch with her. If she wins, they'll announceher name so she can claim her $1,000 prize.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | March 4, 2001
When Diane Becker, the director of the Center for Health Promotion at the Johns Hopkins University, sat down to dinner last month with Harry Belafonte and his wife, Julie, among others, she knew she and the couple shared similar social convictions, but she soon found out they also shared something else: an obsessive love of shoes. "Everybody else thought we were totally bizarre," says Becker, 57, a woman who actually chose to move, in large part, because she was out of closet space. "We discussed how Mrs. Belafonte puts her shoes in a large array on the closet floor and how mine are all in boxes and sorted by the size of the heel and colors of the fabric."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 13, 1998
Harry Belafonte received the first lifetime achievement award at the Heritage Shadows of a Silver Screen black film museum and cinema last Saturday.At an invitation-only brunch, Belafonte spoke to the crowd of nearly 100 people for more than an hour, reminiscing about growing up the son of a single mother in Harlem; his service in World War II, after which he returned to "business as usual" of racism and segregation in the United States; and his coming under...
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1998
The voice sounds weary, but, after all, it's 10: 30 p.m.long-time fans and bring in new, younger ones. "Most of the music is African- and Caribbean-influenced," he says. "That is music that people are becoming more attuned to."He is busy co-producing "Parting the Waters" for television, adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Taylor Branch that chronicles America's civil rights movement."We are madly pulling together all of the different aspects of that," he says. "It will be a miniseries, eight hours, or maybe 12 hours.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.