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By Chris Kaltenbach | October 18, 1998
Believe it or not, Bela Lugosi was more than just Dracula - even if the accent always brings back memories of the world's most famous bloodsucker.For proof, check out Tuesday's Lugosi fest on TCM. For early risers (or those who have mastered their VCR timers), things start off at 6 a.m. with 1933's "The Death Kiss." At 7:30 a.m., it's "Mark of the Vampire," with Lionel Barrymore and Lionel Atwill joining Bela in a murder mystery that seems to have something to do with vampires. And at 8:45 a.m., Kay Kyser and his band try to save a girl trapped in a haunted house in 1940's "You'll Find Out."
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By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Rob Mies wants to tackle the image problem bats have head-on. No, they're not going to land on your head and mess up your hair something fierce. No, they're not going to suck your blood and turn into Robert Pattinson (or Bela Lugosi). And yes, they do an awful lot of good. For one thing, they make margaritas possible. "I try to find things that I feel people will be wowed by, that if bats didn't exist, their life would actually change," says Mies, who will be talking about all things bat (and showing off a few of the critters)
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By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
Los Angeles -- Forget the buzz and speculation about Martin Landau's amazing portrayal of Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton's eccentric film "Ed Wood." Here's the inside skinny -- Mr. Landau will win the Best Supporting Actor Oscar.How do we know? After a lunch of Chinese garlic shrimp, Mr. Landau opens a fortune cookie to behold this promise: "You will receive some high praise or award." "This is hilarious -- I've never gotten one like this before," he says with a laugh -- then he carefully tucks the fortune into his wallet.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Unless your goal is to become a scream queen the way Jamie Lee Curtis did in Halloween, it's not easy to boost your career acting in any kind of horror film. When the protagonist commits deeds sure to damn a soul or at least imperil a body, the actor must remain sympathetic or intriguing enough to get an audience screaming "Don't open that door!" - or, as I heard during the original Prom Night, "Don't step on that head!" If gore-soaked thespians are able to do even more than that, and create multidimensional characters in extreme conditions, their future is assured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 24, 1999
The bad guys in "Les Vampires," French director Louis Feuillade's 1915 movie serial, don't suck blood, they steal jewels. And Bela Lugosi is nowhere in sight (although one of the actors looks suspiciously like him). But this 10-part, eight-hour silent journey through the streets and along the rooftops of Paris, as a nasty band of thieves (led by the sinister Irma Vep, played by Musidora of the Folies Bergere) prey on the rich and powerful, is more than eerie enough to warrant tonight's Halloween-season airing on TCM, beginning at 8 p.m.Grotesqueries abound (at one point, a box is opened to reveal ... a severed head!
NEWS
By DREW LIMSKY and DREW LIMSKY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1995
XTC"Our Vampires, Ourselves," by Nina Auerbach. University of Chicago Press. 231 pages. $22 Despite a liberal dose of pop-culture references - including its title, a witty send-up of the self-help staple, "Our Bodies, Ourselves" - Nina Auerbach' s "Our Vampires, Ourselves" is not for the casual vampire fan. Still, this monograph is accessible enough to attract more than a niche market of Gothic scholars and devotees of Bram Stoker or Bela Lugosi.Literate readers of many stripes will find much to savor in this academic survey of vampires from romanticism to Reaganism, and those who have been yearning for a thorough analysis of the shifting role of the character Van Helsing (originally from Stoker's classic 1879 novel, "Dracula")
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Unless your goal is to become a scream queen the way Jamie Lee Curtis did in Halloween, it's not easy to boost your career acting in any kind of horror film. When the protagonist commits deeds sure to damn a soul or at least imperil a body, the actor must remain sympathetic or intriguing enough to get an audience screaming "Don't open that door!" - or, as I heard during the original Prom Night, "Don't step on that head!" If gore-soaked thespians are able to do even more than that, and create multidimensional characters in extreme conditions, their future is assured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Rob Mies wants to tackle the image problem bats have head-on. No, they're not going to land on your head and mess up your hair something fierce. No, they're not going to suck your blood and turn into Robert Pattinson (or Bela Lugosi). And yes, they do an awful lot of good. For one thing, they make margaritas possible. "I try to find things that I feel people will be wowed by, that if bats didn't exist, their life would actually change," says Mies, who will be talking about all things bat (and showing off a few of the critters)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009
SATURDAY TRICKS AND TREATS AT THE CHARLES: The Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St., offers up a sweet cinematic treat for Halloween. "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein" is a horror spoof starring Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Lon Chaney Jr. and Bela Lugosi. For this special noon children's matinee, children are admitted free. Adult admission is $6. Go to thecharles.com. MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER MINI-MARATHON: B-movie fans can crack wise along with MST3K's Tom Servo, Crow and Gypsy when the Carroll County Arts Council, 91 W. Main St., screens "Santa Claus Conquers the Martians," "Teenagers from Outer Space" and "Manos: The Hands of Fate."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 27, 2008
It's all Clint (almost) all day, as AMC brings viewers nearly 10 straight hours of the guy with the most bankable squint in Hollywood, in the role that proved he wasn't just a cowboy anymore. As San Francisco cop Harry Callahan, Clint took guff from no one, least of all some bad guys screaming about their rights. The Clintfest kicks off at 3:30 p.m. with Don Siegel's 1971 Dirty Harry, where Eastwood gets to play the archetypal vigilante cop, daring bad guys to take a chance on how many rounds he has left in his gun. A trio of muy macho sequels follows: Ted Post's 1973 Magnum Force at 5:30 p.m., James Fargo's 1976 The Enforcer at 8 and Eastwood directing himself in 1983's Sudden Impact (which was also the last film he would make with girlfriend Sondra Locke, who would later file a palimony suit against him)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 24, 1999
The bad guys in "Les Vampires," French director Louis Feuillade's 1915 movie serial, don't suck blood, they steal jewels. And Bela Lugosi is nowhere in sight (although one of the actors looks suspiciously like him). But this 10-part, eight-hour silent journey through the streets and along the rooftops of Paris, as a nasty band of thieves (led by the sinister Irma Vep, played by Musidora of the Folies Bergere) prey on the rich and powerful, is more than eerie enough to warrant tonight's Halloween-season airing on TCM, beginning at 8 p.m.Grotesqueries abound (at one point, a box is opened to reveal ... a severed head!
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 18, 1998
Believe it or not, Bela Lugosi was more than just Dracula - even if the accent always brings back memories of the world's most famous bloodsucker.For proof, check out Tuesday's Lugosi fest on TCM. For early risers (or those who have mastered their VCR timers), things start off at 6 a.m. with 1933's "The Death Kiss." At 7:30 a.m., it's "Mark of the Vampire," with Lionel Barrymore and Lionel Atwill joining Bela in a murder mystery that seems to have something to do with vampires. And at 8:45 a.m., Kay Kyser and his band try to save a girl trapped in a haunted house in 1940's "You'll Find Out."
NEWS
By DREW LIMSKY and DREW LIMSKY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1995
XTC"Our Vampires, Ourselves," by Nina Auerbach. University of Chicago Press. 231 pages. $22 Despite a liberal dose of pop-culture references - including its title, a witty send-up of the self-help staple, "Our Bodies, Ourselves" - Nina Auerbach' s "Our Vampires, Ourselves" is not for the casual vampire fan. Still, this monograph is accessible enough to attract more than a niche market of Gothic scholars and devotees of Bram Stoker or Bela Lugosi.Literate readers of many stripes will find much to savor in this academic survey of vampires from romanticism to Reaganism, and those who have been yearning for a thorough analysis of the shifting role of the character Van Helsing (originally from Stoker's classic 1879 novel, "Dracula")
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
Los Angeles -- Forget the buzz and speculation about Martin Landau's amazing portrayal of Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton's eccentric film "Ed Wood." Here's the inside skinny -- Mr. Landau will win the Best Supporting Actor Oscar.How do we know? After a lunch of Chinese garlic shrimp, Mr. Landau opens a fortune cookie to behold this promise: "You will receive some high praise or award." "This is hilarious -- I've never gotten one like this before," he says with a laugh -- then he carefully tucks the fortune into his wallet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler | October 30, 1997
Halloween goes to the movies this weekend. At the Charles, David Lynch's cult classic "Eraserhead" plays at 11: 15 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday. This black-and-white flick starring the late Jack Nance is a headache-inducing collage of industrial wastelands and disgusting images. I love it.At Bengie's Drive-In Theatre, families can enjoy horror films rated G or PG: Roger Corman's "Masque of the Red Death" (1964), "Dracula Has Risen From the Grave" (1968) and "Dracula A.D. 1972," all preceded by George Pal's collection of animated shorts, "The Puppetoon Movie."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1995
"Pulp Fiction," the exuberant, innovatively structured crime drama directed by Quentin Tarantino, was named the best film of 1994 by the National Society of Film Critics yesterday. Voting at the Algonquin Hotel in New York, the 42-member group also cited Mr. Tarantino as best director and gave its best-screenplay prize to him and Roger Avary as the film's co-writers.Jennifer Jason Leigh was voted best actress for her performance as the caustic, brittle heroine of "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle."
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