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By Meekah Hopkins and By Meekah Hopkins | October 16, 2012
Apples are fall's fruit to most. But there's another forgotten fruit that's in season -- one that is, in my opinion, a better flavor to infuse into cocktails: the pomegranate. This seedy little wonder is tangier than an apple, sweeter than a cranberry - basically, the perfect taste for richer, darker autumnal drinks. Pomegranates are also associated with ancient Middle Eastern cultures, which use the harvest in a variety of salads, sauces, oils, and drinks. Lebanese Taverna in Harbor East pays homage to the fruit and their own heritage with the Beirut, a potent cocktail of traditional arak.
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By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Date: Dec. 6 and 7 Her story: Zaineb Makhzoumi, 33, grew up in Lutherville. She is a dermatologist, Mohs surgeon and assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Her parents, Hassan and Rayya Makhzoumi, emigrated from Beirut in 1978. They moved back to Beirut in 2008, though Rayya returns to their Lutherville home several times a year. His story: Ayman Tomhe, 34, also grew up in Lutherville. He was a 7-Eleven franchisee for 10 years before opening a State Farm office in Baltimore last month.
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NEWS
December 15, 2005
The self-proclaimed assassins of Lebanese journalist Gibran Tueni boasted in a statement that they had broken his pen. How mistaken they are - the anti-Syrian views he expressed in the pages of his Beirut newspaper, An-Nahar, were not his alone. And his murder Monday shouldn't keep other Lebanese from demanding their rights to live freely, without interference from Syria, its agents and provocateurs. Not if Mr. Tueni is the example. The 48-year-old publisher had long protested Syria's military occupation of his home country, which began in the midst of the Lebanese civil war three decades ago. He continued his sharp attacks, even as prominent Lebanese, beginning with former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, were killed in one targeted car bombing after another this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and By Meekah Hopkins | October 16, 2012
Apples are fall's fruit to most. But there's another forgotten fruit that's in season -- one that is, in my opinion, a better flavor to infuse into cocktails: the pomegranate. This seedy little wonder is tangier than an apple, sweeter than a cranberry - basically, the perfect taste for richer, darker autumnal drinks. Pomegranates are also associated with ancient Middle Eastern cultures, which use the harvest in a variety of salads, sauces, oils, and drinks. Lebanese Taverna in Harbor East pays homage to the fruit and their own heritage with the Beirut, a potent cocktail of traditional arak.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
A few years ago, the term "mushrooms" made its way into the journalistic lingo to refer to innocent bystanders who pop up unexpectedly in the midst of drug-related gun battles. This week, separate incidents on the same day in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., served as a tragic reminder of just how commonplace such incidents have become.In Baltimore, a 6-year-old girl was the victim, shot to death by gun-toting thugs firing at each other over the length of a city block. In Washington, a mother of three was killed by a bullet that entered her car as she was driving her children home.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 12, 2008
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Fierce clashes broke out yesterday in the mountains east of Beirut between supporters of the Western-backed government and followers of Hezbollah, the militant group backed by Iran. The fighting, in the Shouf and Aley districts in the mountains overlooking the capital, Beirut, followed overnight clashes in the northern city of Tripoli that left at least two people dead and five wounded, according to security officials. Beirut, where there had been heavy fighting between Sunnis and Shiites since Wednesday, was calm yesterday.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 28, 1994
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- The Beautiful People are back at the St. Georges Yacht Club, bikinied by the pool and Izoded on the tennis courts.They shift effortlessly from French to Arabic to English; urbane chatter all the more incongruous for its setting.The yacht club sits amid hulking concrete skeletons of battle, the pocked and burned cityscape of the suicidal civil war of Lebanon.But then, this is Beirut. Its red-painted nails never were totally obscured by the grime of war.Lebanon's capital city is being reborn after the 15-year civil war that ended in 1990, including the Israeli invasion of 1982.
NEWS
By Sheldon Himelfarb | October 22, 1993
TOMORROW, America will mark the 10-year anniversary of another international peacekeeping disaster -- one in which more U.S. Marines were killed on a single day than on any day since Iwo Jima.The tragedy occurred in Beirut, Lebanon, on Oct. 23, 1983. A Hezbollah suicide bomber drove a truck loaded with explosives into the Marine barracks at dawn, slaughtering 242 sleeping men.In a recent series of interviews, survivors of the blast and the politicians who dispatched them shed new light on the disaster.
NEWS
By DOUG STRUCK and DOUG STRUCK,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 10, 1995
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- This city is gradually shedding its war clothes, sloughing off the tattered battle uniform of shell-pocked buildings and ruined streets.It wants to erase the telltale ruins that became a worldwide symbol of senseless war, of a society drawn to self-destruction in a frenzy of neighbor killing neighbor.Building blocks now are stacked between the piles of rubble. The shriek of artillery has given way to the rumble of cement mixers. Construction cranes knit a new Beirut skyline from one made ragged by 16 years of war."
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
BEIRUT -- The usual crowd is here: smoothies in their sil suits; gruff working men who slipped away from work; old codgers with time on their hands and racing forms stuffed into their pockets.This could be the regular crowd at Pimlico. But at the Beirut Race Course, being a regular has often meant risking your life as well as your money.Take the annual Christmas race in 1979. Gunmen on one side or another in the fractious civil war opened fire on the horses at the starting line, then raked the crowd.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 18, 2008
MENIEH, Lebanon -- After almost a week of street battles that left scores dead and threatened to push the country into open war, long-simmering Sunni-Shiite tensions here have sharply worsened, in an ominous echo of the civil conflict in Iraq. Hezbollah's brief takeover of Beirut led to brutal counterattacks in northern Lebanon, where Sunni Muslims deeply resented the Shiite militant group's display of power. The violence energized radical Sunni factions, including some affiliated with al-Qaida, and extremist Sunni Web sites across the Arab world have been buzzing with calls for a jihad to avenge the wounded pride of Lebanese Sunnis.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 12, 2008
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Fierce clashes broke out yesterday in the mountains east of Beirut between supporters of the Western-backed government and followers of Hezbollah, the militant group backed by Iran. The fighting, in the Shouf and Aley districts in the mountains overlooking the capital, Beirut, followed overnight clashes in the northern city of Tripoli that left at least two people dead and five wounded, according to security officials. Beirut, where there had been heavy fighting between Sunnis and Shiites since Wednesday, was calm yesterday.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2008
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Lebanon's political and military leaders struggled to pull the country back yesterday from a deepening civil conflict that has left at least 34 people dead in four days of violence between Iranian-backed militias and supporters of the pro-U.S. government. By yesterday evening, the government appeared to back away from the political decree that sparked the confrontation, while the Shiite militia Hezbollah gave up its control of West Beirut, which it had seized handily a day earlier in an offensive that stunned Lebanese and sent shock waves throughout the region.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei and Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei,Los Angeles Times | May 10, 2008
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- In one swoop, the Shiite Muslim militia Hezbollah took over a large section of Lebanon's capital yesterday, altering the country's political balance and demonstrating a level of military discipline and efficiency that left the pro-Western government struggling to exert its authority. In a space of 12 hours, the Iranian-backed group dispatched hundreds of heavily armed Shiite fighters into the western half of the capital, routing pro-government Sunni militiamen, destroying opponents' political offices and shutting down media outlets loyal to Prime Minister Fouad Siniora and to Sunni leader Saad Hariri's Future movement.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | April 25, 2008
Hip audiences may recognize Tom McCarthy only as weaselly Sun reporter Scott Templeton in the final season of The Wire. And more people may see McCarthy's deft cameo as Tina Fey's disastrous first date in today's big-studio comedy release, Baby Mama, than will catch the marvelous independent film he wrote and directed, The Visitor. Yet with The Station Agent (2003) and The Visitor, McCarthy has made films whose size expands in a viewer's heart, mind and memory - and whose influence travels across the globe.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 14, 2008
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- A senior Hezbollah military commander, one of America's most wanted men for his alleged links to a string of bombings, hijackings and kidnappings in the 1980s and 1990s, has been killed, the Shiite Muslim group said in a statement yesterday. Hezbollah accused Israel of orchestrating the killing. Security officials in Lebanon said the man, Imad Mugniyah, who was believed to be behind attacks in 1983 on the U.S. Embassy and Marine barracks in Beirut and the terrorist hijacking of a TWA jetliner in 1985, was killed Tuesday night by a car bomb in Damascus, Syria.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- In shattered urban caves, shells of broke buildings where the victims of war huddle to share the food scavenged in the day and a fire built at night, Samya, the Muslim woman, brings her baby to Laures, the Christian.Samya is thin, and stares at her world with flat, sullen eyes. She has no husband, no money and no food. Her child is hungry, and she has nothing to give.Laures smiles at the child. She raises her sweater to offer the baby her breast.This simple act of sustaining life must surely humble those who for 15 years found excuse in religion or politics to kill, who waged the long sectarian civil war that ripped this country apart.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 18, 1996
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- The growl of generators fills this darkened capital. Cobwebs of makeshift electric lines have been rewoven over streets, as Lebanese resume the survival habits that got them through 15 years of civil war.Israel's bombardment in Lebanon has brought back hardships and fears that the people of Beirut thought were finally behind them.The week of attacks has tripped up Lebanon's eager rush to rebuild the country after the internal warfare ended in 1990 and squelched the bubbling Lebanese optimism that is the lifeblood of that effort.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei and Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2008
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- At least five civilians were killed in Beirut yesterday evening during an hours-long clash between Lebanese soldiers and young Shiite Muslim men protesting electricity cuts, security officials said. A dozen or more people were wounded in the melee when gunfire erupted as demonstrators were throwing rocks and fireworks at troops. Several residents in an adjacent Christian neighborhood were injured by a hand grenade, Lebanese television reported. The violence came two days after a car bomb killed one of the country's top intelligence officials and 12 days after another blast struck a U.S. Embassy convoy, killing three civilians.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei and Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei,Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2007
Beirut -- Lebanon's shaky government veered into uncertain political terrain early this morning as midnight struck and its president's term expired without the naming of a successor. Faced with a constitutional crisis, both the pro-Western government and the Syrian- and Iranian-backed opposition made competing claims to power, but both sides also ruled out the possibility of violence to resolve differences in the months-long dispute. The outgoing president declared a state of emergency, but the order was derided by many as having no practical effect.
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