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By Rob Kasper | February 10, 2010
F at Tuesday is a day I support in a two-fisted manner, with both of my fists covered with powdered sugar. The idea behind Fat Tuesday, or in French, Mardi Gras, is that sinners get one last day of indulgence before facing 40 days of mortification, also known as Lent. I have always been keen on the indulgence aspect of this transaction and pretty feeble on the mortification. Among the foods that shout "pleasure binge," doughnuts lead the chorus. The prime example of a Fat Tuesday doughnut is a beignet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
Lamill Coffee, the first-floor cafe in the Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore, will be hosting a four-week series of free Saturday morning coffee clinics in January. The free, weekly sessions will highlight coffee extraction methods and coffee roasts. The Lamill team will sample food pairings with the coffee. Lamill is Michael Mina's collaboration with a super-cool Los Angeles-area coffee roaster and retailer. The clinics will introduce guests to the ingenious Hario V60 hand-drip process from Japan and the super sleep Eva Solo from Denmark.
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NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | January 20, 2008
Deep-frying is the bacon of cooking techniques: It makes everything taste better. Do it with beignets, though, and you get the irresistible results in a more lyrical package. The word is almost as satisfying to say as the real thing is to eat. Beignets sound so much lighter and airier than fritters, but they are no easier to pass up. The most famous beignets in this country are a New Orleans specialty: squares of yeasty dough fried until puffy, then smothered in powdered sugar, to be eaten with the local chicory coffee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | February 10, 2010
F at Tuesday is a day I support in a two-fisted manner, with both of my fists covered with powdered sugar. The idea behind Fat Tuesday, or in French, Mardi Gras, is that sinners get one last day of indulgence before facing 40 days of mortification, also known as Lent. I have always been keen on the indulgence aspect of this transaction and pretty feeble on the mortification. Among the foods that shout "pleasure binge," doughnuts lead the chorus. The prime example of a Fat Tuesday doughnut is a beignet.
FEATURES
September 3, 2005
Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans? Everyone, it seems, has fond memories of visiting this delightful city, now so sadly ravaged by Katrina. Share your New Orleans experiences with us for a coming story: Did you catch beads at Mardi Gras? Dance to the Neville Brothers at Tipitina's? Follow a night of Bourbon Street revelry with warm beignets at Cafe du Monde? Send your memories by Tuesday to sun.features @baltsun.com, with "New Orleans" in the subject line. Please include a daytime phone number where you can be reached.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
Lamill Coffee, the first-floor cafe in the Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore, will be hosting a four-week series of free Saturday morning coffee clinics in January. The free, weekly sessions will highlight coffee extraction methods and coffee roasts. The Lamill team will sample food pairings with the coffee. Lamill is Michael Mina's collaboration with a super-cool Los Angeles-area coffee roaster and retailer. The clinics will introduce guests to the ingenious Hario V60 hand-drip process from Japan and the super sleep Eva Solo from Denmark.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2005
It may not be grammatically correct to call a city the "most unique" in the country, but that didn't stop New Orleans from doing so - and not too many disputed it. From its food to its music, from the parties it threw to the literature it spawned, New Orleans culture was so distinct, and so influential, that Hurricane Katrina and the Pompeii-like flooding that followed - deadly as they were - couldn't erase it. The city's rich culture is safe, having...
TRAVEL
By Tom Uhlenbrock and Tom Uhlenbrock,St. Louis Post-Dispatch | May 16, 2004
Twenty years ago, Kevin Kelly ended his paid tour of Houmas House by tossing a quarter into a wishing well fashioned from a huge, sugar-cane syrup kettle. "I wished that one day I'd own a plantation," Kelly recalled. Wishes do come true. Kelly, a 48-year-old bachelor from New Orleans, has done well in shipping and real estate. Last May, he returned to Houmas House and bought the 21-room Greek Revival mansion in Darrow, La. Another of the grand old houses of the Deep South was saved.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
The deadline for registering at the early rate for the American Copy Editors Society's national conference in New Orleans has been extended until February 8. That would be tomorrow.  There is nowhere else that you will find as thoroughgoing an exploration of the craft of editing, with as many experiences practitioners. Alex Cruden's exploration of how readers actually read headlines has exploded many presuppositions. Bill Connolly's "Jimmy's World" has demonstrated how close reading and determined editing could have avoided a major scandal.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 12, 2013
It's Fat Tuesday and many of us are going to indulge in rich gumbos, savory jambalayas and sweet beignets in honor of the occasion. Eating healthy may seem fruitless on a day devoted to high-calorie, rich foods. But there are ways to make healthier versions of our favorite Fat Tuesday dishes. Eatingwell.com offers this healthy sausage gumbo recipe. Ingredients 12 ounces hot Italian turkey sausage links, removed from casings 2 teaspoons canola oil 1 large onion, diced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 4 cups chopped tomatoes 4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth 2 1/2 cups frozen chopped okra 3/4 cup instant brown rice 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and sliced (optional)
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | January 20, 2008
Deep-frying is the bacon of cooking techniques: It makes everything taste better. Do it with beignets, though, and you get the irresistible results in a more lyrical package. The word is almost as satisfying to say as the real thing is to eat. Beignets sound so much lighter and airier than fritters, but they are no easier to pass up. The most famous beignets in this country are a New Orleans specialty: squares of yeasty dough fried until puffy, then smothered in powdered sugar, to be eaten with the local chicory coffee.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2005
It may not be grammatically correct to call a city the "most unique" in the country, but that didn't stop New Orleans from doing so - and not too many disputed it. From its food to its music, from the parties it threw to the literature it spawned, New Orleans culture was so distinct, and so influential, that Hurricane Katrina and the Pompeii-like flooding that followed - deadly as they were - couldn't erase it. The city's rich culture is safe, having...
FEATURES
September 5, 2005
Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans? Everyone, it seems, has fond memories of visiting this delightful city, now so sadly ravaged by Katrina. Share your New Orleans experiences with us for a coming story: Did you catch beads at Mardi Gras? Dance to the Neville Brothers at Tipitina's? Follow a night of Bourbon Street revelry with warm beignets at Cafe du Monde? Send your memories by Tuesday to sun.features@baltsun.com, with "New Orleans" in the subject line. Please include a daytime phone number where you can be reached.
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