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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER | December 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy continued to expand in November, but prices and wage pressures remained muted, the Federal Reserve said yesterday in its periodic Report on Current Economic Conditions.The report, known as the beige book, also noted that credit standards were "generally" tight, despite strong loan demand in most areas.The report said economic growth remained solid -- particularly in the Chicago, Minneapolis, Richmond (which includes Baltimore) and San Francisco Fed districts -- despite a contraction in export industries.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 13, 2006
Maybe the sputtering housing market will not be that big a drag on the economy after all. Falling gasoline prices are leaving Americans with more money to spend, and inflation has become less of a threat in recent weeks, according to a report released yesterday by the Federal Reserve. Wall Street reveled at the news. Stock prices - already buoyed by a series of strong corporate earnings announcements from companies like McDonald's and Costco - surged even higher after the Fed's report, the so-called beige book for the color of its cover, came out yesterday afternoon.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - Manufacturing slowed in the United States, and retail sales weakened as consumers turned cautious at the onset of war with Iraq, the Federal Reserve said in its survey of regional economies. "The pace of economic activity continued to be lackluster during March and the first two weeks of April," said the survey that was released yesterday. "The onset of the war appeared to have some effect on sales and spending, although it is too early to ascertain the full effect of the war on both consumer and business confidence."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. industrial production increased 1.1 percent in May, the most in nearly six years, as utilities generated more power and companies made more business equipment. Builders began work on more homes than forecast, and construction permits reached the highest annual rate in three decades. The rise in production at the nation's factories, mines and utilities followed April's 0.8 percent increase, the Federal Reserve said. Separately, the Commerce Department said housing starts fell 0.7 percent to an annual rate of 1.97 million, topping economists' expectations.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 29, 2001
WASHINGTON - The economy showed few signs of improvement in late October and the first half of November as businesses reduced spending and cut jobs, the Federal Reserve's latest survey of regional economic activity said yesterday. "Economic activity generally remained soft" through the first half of this month and "evidence of additional slowing in most regions outweighed signs of recovery in a few districts," said the report, commonly known as the beige book. The tone of the report means people "are much less likely to buy into this notion that things are stabilizing," said Joseph LaVorgna, senior economist at Deutsche Banc Securities Inc. in New York.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | March 19, 1992
NEW YORK -- In yet another sign that the economy might be moving ahead, a periodic survey of business conditions by regional Federal Reserve Banks replaced "sluggish" -- the descriptive term of choice for more than a year -- with "some improvement."While the tone was muted in typical Fed fashion, the results released yesterday were received enthusiastically."A slight amount of upturn here is not to be ignored," said Ray Owens, economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. "The anecdotal evidence in the survey results corresponds to the hard data pointing to brighter days ahead."
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | March 19, 1992
NEW YORK -- In yet another sign that the economy might be moving ahead, a periodic survey of business conditions by regional Federal Reserve Banks replaced "sluggish" -- the descriptive term of choice for more than a year -- with "some improvement."While the tone was muted in typical Fed fashion, the results released yesterday were received enthusiastically."A slight amount of upturn here is not to be ignored," said Ray Owens, economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. "The anecdotal evidence in the survey results corresponds to the hard data pointing to brighter days ahead."
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1991
NEW YORK -- "Weak," "lackluster," "sluggish" -- once again, these were the words the Federal Reserve used to describe business conditions in the region from Maryland to South Carolina during September and early October.In its periodic update of conditions throughout the country, the Fed said that the economy is "weak or growing slowly." Retail pTC sales remain poor, and improvement in manufacturing output, recently one of the few bright spots in the economy, is less robust, the report said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy is expanding with little signs of inflation, the Federal Reserve said yesterday in a report that some analysts said will take the edge off investor expectations that central bankers will raise interest rates again soon.The report -- compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York -- is one of eight produced each year for the Federal Reserve Board. The survey based its conclusions on expanding manufacturing, strength in retail sales and construction, and rising loan demand.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | June 18, 1992
NEW YORK -- No need to get overly excited, but the economy in the Maryland area and the nation is continuing to expand, if modestly.The Federal Reserve Board's survey of current economic conditions, released yesterday, was upbeat and, given the Fed's tendency to be blase about even the most dramatic trend, unusually emphatic about the overall outlook."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - Manufacturing slowed in the United States, and retail sales weakened as consumers turned cautious at the onset of war with Iraq, the Federal Reserve said in its survey of regional economies. "The pace of economic activity continued to be lackluster during March and the first two weeks of April," said the survey that was released yesterday. "The onset of the war appeared to have some effect on sales and spending, although it is too early to ascertain the full effect of the war on both consumer and business confidence."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 29, 2001
WASHINGTON - The economy showed few signs of improvement in late October and the first half of November as businesses reduced spending and cut jobs, the Federal Reserve's latest survey of regional economic activity said yesterday. "Economic activity generally remained soft" through the first half of this month and "evidence of additional slowing in most regions outweighed signs of recovery in a few districts," said the report, commonly known as the beige book. The tone of the report means people "are much less likely to buy into this notion that things are stabilizing," said Joseph LaVorgna, senior economist at Deutsche Banc Securities Inc. in New York.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy is expanding with little signs of inflation, the Federal Reserve said yesterday in a report that some analysts said will take the edge off investor expectations that central bankers will raise interest rates again soon.The report -- compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York -- is one of eight produced each year for the Federal Reserve Board. The survey based its conclusions on expanding manufacturing, strength in retail sales and construction, and rising loan demand.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER | December 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy continued to expand in November, but prices and wage pressures remained muted, the Federal Reserve said yesterday in its periodic Report on Current Economic Conditions.The report, known as the beige book, also noted that credit standards were "generally" tight, despite strong loan demand in most areas.The report said economic growth remained solid -- particularly in the Chicago, Minneapolis, Richmond (which includes Baltimore) and San Francisco Fed districts -- despite a contraction in export industries.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 6, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The crisis in Asia is applying the brakes to U.S. growth and putting pressure on manufacturers and retailers to hold down prices, the Federal Reserve said yesterday in its latest reading on the economy.The Fed said retail sales in recent weeks fueled further economic expansion but that "labor shortages, shipping bottlenecks and continued weakness in East Asia were beginning to temper growth." That contrasts with the Fed's previous regional outlook report in mid-June, when it described the United States as enjoying an "excellent" combination of continued growth and low inflation.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Inflation remained absent from the U.S. economy in recent weeks as Asia's financial crisis restrained growth and unleashed a flood of cheaper imports that helped keep prices in check, the Federal Reserve said yesterday."
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | June 18, 1992
NEW YORK -- No need to get overly excited, but the economy in the Maryland area and the nation is continuing to expand, if modestly.The Federal Reserve Board's survey of current economic conditions, released yesterday, was upbeat and, given the Fed's tendency to be blase about even the most dramatic trend, unusually emphatic about the overall outlook."
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | December 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Maryland region is shadowing the natio in registering modest increases in economic activity, according to a Federal Reserve analysis issued yesterday.The main gains locally were reported in retail and residential home sales, but manufacturing and employment remained stubbornly unchanged."Retailers were upbeat about recent business conditions and saw improved prospects for the next six months," said the report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, which covers Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, Washington and most of West Virginia.
NEWS
May 11, 1996
SPRING IS A TIME of renewal and hope, of flowers in bloom and high spirits. And this year, there are signs that Maryland may finally see more sustained economic growth than it has experienced this decade. That means better employment prospects in the private sector, especially in the state's fast-growing outer suburbs.Every day this week, The Sun has reported good news: Food Lion is building six supermarkets, including a Randallstown and a Taneytown store; Staples plans to put up six super-sized office supply stores, on top of a $43 million distribution center opening in Washington County next February; Baltimore-area home sales soared 35 percent last month, the strongest gain in three years; the Chesapeake Bagel Bakery is opening 11 stores, and interest among national retailers in the Power Plant entertainment complex is heating up.These are the most visible signs of an economic pickup.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy continued to lose steam heading into June, with a marked weakening in demand for autos and other consumer goods, the Federal Reserve said yesterday.Inflation, meantime, remained under control, the Fed said in its so-called beige book report on economic conditions in the United States. The survey is based on reports from the Fed's 12 district banks collected before June 12.Though the Fed described the level of economic activity as "high," it also found regional variations, with much of the strength in the inland states and "generally less favorable conditions on the East and West coasts."
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