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Behavior

NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2003
Orangutans -- those tree-living apes with the flashy red manes -- have distinct cultures that dictate how they build their nests, use tools, eat, show off for each other and even how they say good night, according to a study being published today. The study, in today's issue of Science, says that three decades of observations by some of the world's leading experts shows orangutans behave along cultural patterns, an intellectual achievement previously thought to be reserved to humans and chimpanzees.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
The courier with the cocaine just might be that young mother balancing a baby on her knee on the southbound train. Or the guy in the business suit, keeping carefully to the speed limit as he drives down Interstate 95. Or the kid playing the Game-boy aboard the New York-to-Baltimore bus.So how do the police catch the couriers?Surprisingly, police say, relatively few Baltimore-bound drug smugglers are caught on the basis of tips from informants. Far more often, state troopers or police detectives pick out someone who is behaving suspiciously, confront them -- and watch them give themselves away with lies, contradictions, or outright confessions.
NEWS
May 7, 1998
GIVE A principal a choice between dealing with violence in school or public displays of affection -- PDAs as they are commonly known -- and the choice is easy. PDAs would win hands down.Even so, the issue commands a lot of attention from school administrators, and for good reason. Appropriate behavior is as important in school as in the workplace. Kissing or fondling at work is not likely to be tolerated. Nor should it be at school.But enforcing such rules can be tricky. Witness the case of two juniors expelled from a Catholic school in Frederick for several minutes of demonstrative behavior in a hallway after school.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | May 22, 2008
Maryland Transit Administration officials are offering discount cards for area businesses to students who pledge good behavior on city buses, an incentive that transit administrators hope will help curb disrespectful and violent behavior. The discount card will offer 10 percent to 20 percent off purchases at 12 city establishments, including Dunkin' Donuts, Cold Stone Creamery, Shoe City, Downtown Locker Room and other places. MTA administrators registered students for the first time yesterday at the Johns Hopkins Metro Station, where about 100 took the pledge, according to spokeswoman Jawauna Greene.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Jake France said the final straw was a 2-by-4 piece of lumber -- the one the deaf man used to beat on the corner of the new house on Mr. France's property."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2001
Students in Howard County's Cooperative Work Experience classes this year can look forward to entering the summer with a passport. It will not allow them to enter foreign countries, but it will tell local employers that the student has the potential to travel far in their companies. The Passport to the Future, a program to be launched in schools this year through a partnership with the Howard County Chamber of Commerce, will serve as the business community's seal of approval on a student's preparedness for work.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2004
At Brooklyn Park Middle School, sixth-graders packed a small storage space, turning in coupons they received for good behavior and getting candy, school supplies and gifts for their family in return. "It's just like going to work," said Jessica Rasinski, 11, who had tucked a bright blue-and-pink pen into her purse. "You earn your daily pay, and you spend it in the store." Statistics at many of nearly 300 schools, scattered among all of Maryland's systems, show fewer trips to the office and fewer suspensions from school through a program called Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, intended to help school officials examine discipline patterns and reinforce good manners and respect.
NEWS
By Rachel Abbott | November 1, 2013
Climate change is a looming problem that will affect developed and developing countries. Developed nations have historically - and primarily - contributed to this problem, despite the fact that developing nations will be disproportionately affected in coming years. Social and environmental justice issues are inherently linked to climate change. Thus, it is critical to produce behavior change in developed countries and help developing countries adapt to climate change. Part of tackling climate change is understanding why humans harm the environment.
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | August 18, 2006
A federal program at select U.S. airports using trained security officers to identify terrorists and other lawbreakers by studying passenger behavior arrived at BWI yesterday, sources familiar with the program said. Transportation Security Administration officials have been working on a national behavior profiling program for about two years, employing officers to watch passengers' mannerisms, facial expressions and other characteristics in an effort to spotlight potential problems. TSA officials wouldn't confirm the move to Baltimore, saying only that the program is being used at about a dozen U.S. airports, including Boston and Washington Dulles.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | November 24, 2004
THE NBA HAS numerous ills, but after last weekend's brawl in Auburn Hills, Mich., players jumping into the stands to fight fans probably is off the list. The next guy who thinks about it likely will flash back to the harsh punishment NBA commissioner David Stern meted out to those involved. Suspended for the season? Millions lost? That's how you get a player's attention. And that's why Stern's sanctions were appropriate. They likely curbed the behavior. But what about out-of-control fans?
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