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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Chef Scott Ryan might be the rare person who did not have a scarring experience with beets as a child. The instructor at Baltimore's Stratford University culinary school was on his honeymoon in Paris when he and his wife packed a picnic that included beets marinated in fresh fennel, lemon and olive oil. It was love at first bite. "I think that many people have bad experiences with food - canned this or canned that - and they don't understand its true nature," said Ryan. "Beets fall into that category.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 2, 2014
At Lib's Grill in Perry Hall, Chef Daniel Chaustit welcomes the summer months with bright colors and the fresh flavors of seasonal fruits. This salad celebrates a variety of flavors and textures, combining crunchy fennel, meaty pistachios, tangy goat cheese, sweet strawberries and earthy beets. On the plate, the riot of color “screams summer,” says Lib's Grill manager Nick Liberatore. Great flavors, fun colors and wild textures? That's definitely something to shout about. Roasted Beets and Goat Cheese with Pomegranate Molasses & Fennel Salt Serves 4 2 pounds assorted beets 2 tablespoons neutral oil, such as vegetable oil Salt to taste ¼ cup toasted pistachios 1 tablespoon roasted fennel seeds ¼ cup strawberries, hulled 1 cup baby arugula 1 bulb baby fennel ¼ cup sherry vinegar ¿ cup kosher salt ¼ cup goat cheese Pomegranate molasses (available at most Middle Eastern or Asian markets)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Beets are back in style. Long thought of as the food of older generations, or deemed too messy to deal with, beets have come back with the help of great chefs across the world. A culinary staple for thousands of years, beets are among the more striking of vegetables, ranging in hues from yellow to dark crimson and all colors in between. There are even some varieties that resemble a bull's-eye. I usually roast beets and dress them with olive oil and a splash of vinegar, but sometimes I want to do a little more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Chef Scott Ryan might be the rare person who did not have a scarring experience with beets as a child. The instructor at Baltimore's Stratford University culinary school was on his honeymoon in Paris when he and his wife packed a picnic that included beets marinated in fresh fennel, lemon and olive oil. It was love at first bite. "I think that many people have bad experiences with food - canned this or canned that - and they don't understand its true nature," said Ryan. "Beets fall into that category.
NEWS
By Emily Green and By Emily Green,Special to the Sun | October 20, 2002
Irwin Goldman is the country's leading authority on the table beet. To be precise, he's the only authority. When I left Goldman, a beet breeder at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, a message asking if he might talk, he returned the call immediately and cried, "I'd love to! There aren't enough people who want to talk about beets!" Table beets, it seems, aren't much grown commercially anywhere in America. While the United States devotes a staggering 1.4 million acres to growing a cousin of theirs, sugar beets, big tough plants fit only for sugar extraction and livestock fodder, Goldman estimates that we grow fewer than 8,000 acres of table beets, more than half of these in Wisconsin.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 2, 2014
At Lib's Grill in Perry Hall, Chef Daniel Chaustit welcomes the summer months with bright colors and the fresh flavors of seasonal fruits. This salad celebrates a variety of flavors and textures, combining crunchy fennel, meaty pistachios, tangy goat cheese, sweet strawberries and earthy beets. On the plate, the riot of color “screams summer,” says Lib's Grill manager Nick Liberatore. Great flavors, fun colors and wild textures? That's definitely something to shout about. Roasted Beets and Goat Cheese with Pomegranate Molasses & Fennel Salt Serves 4 2 pounds assorted beets 2 tablespoons neutral oil, such as vegetable oil Salt to taste ¼ cup toasted pistachios 1 tablespoon roasted fennel seeds ¼ cup strawberries, hulled 1 cup baby arugula 1 bulb baby fennel ¼ cup sherry vinegar ¿ cup kosher salt ¼ cup goat cheese Pomegranate molasses (available at most Middle Eastern or Asian markets)
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | April 18, 1999
Earthy-sweet flavor, a color palette ranging from deepest burgundy to white, and a bonus of leafy greens make an unbeatable combination: beets. While vitamin A-rich beet leaves are quite good in salads or wilted in hot olive oil, it's the fiber-rich roots that cooks appreciate most.In French bistro and country cuisine, beets pickled with onions are a popular accompaniment to sausages and other meats, and often appear on platters of crudites.In Eastern Europe and Russia, red beets are the main ingredient in what amounts to a beloved national dish: a robust soup known as borscht, which is always served with sour cream.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1994
Just mentioning peanut butter cream pie can conjure up a big fat guilt trip. To shorten the ride, think about a bowl of Ukrainian borscht.From Westminster, O. Hargraves asked for the pie recipe. And the borscht was the request of Charles E. Hopwood III of Baltimore, who wrote that he wanted a "Ukrainian borscht similar to the one I had in the Russian restaurant Moscow Night before it closed. It was a wonderful garnet-colored thin beet soup that was spiced and served with a big dollop of sour cream in the center.
FEATURES
By Kyra Effren and Kyra Effren,Dallas Morning News | October 20, 1991
Beets . . . I used to hate them.Oh, I always had seconds of my mother's pink chicken salad with beets, and I like cold beet soup, or borscht, but it was only this summer, when I ate more than my fair share of Mom's beet chutney, that I realized it's time to bring my attitude in line with my taste buds.Beets can be grated raw in salad, served as a side vegetable or cooked into soup or relish. They're wonderful in a chocolate cake.They have an affinity for cream sauces and vinegar, and are even cut into fancy shapes to serve as an elegant garnish.
FEATURES
By Alice Waters and the editors of Eating Well and Alice Waters and the editors of Eating Well,United Featured Syndicate | March 10, 1993
We asked restaurateur Alice Waters to adapt some recipes from Chez Panisse, the famous California restaurant, -- mindful that our readers would be soon foraging in local markets in the early springtime.Ms. Waters graciously obliged with a salad, a provocative combination of wedges of red and golden beets nestled on tender asparagus, all seasoned with a straightforward shallot vinaigrette and a lively salsa verde that is a fine garnish for delicately flavored dishes such as poached salmon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
We live in an age that glorifies home cooking. Accomplished chefs across the region strive to recreate the flavors, smells and experiences of their grandmothers' kitchens. "Comfort food" is an haute cuisine buzzword. Though it's been open for more than five decades, with capable home-style cooking and kindly service, Friendly Farm is a restaurant for these times. Jack and Dorothy Wilhelm opened the restaurant in 1959, after an accident left Jack unable to work their 200-acre Upperco farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Beets are back in style. Long thought of as the food of older generations, or deemed too messy to deal with, beets have come back with the help of great chefs across the world. A culinary staple for thousands of years, beets are among the more striking of vegetables, ranging in hues from yellow to dark crimson and all colors in between. There are even some varieties that resemble a bull's-eye. I usually roast beets and dress them with olive oil and a splash of vinegar, but sometimes I want to do a little more.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | February 5, 2010
State roads have been drenched in ice-melting chemicals, and as today dawns, the workers who operate Maryland's snowplows should have had a good night's rest to prepare for a sleep-deprived weekend. By late morning, the plows should be in position to jump into action if and when the flakes - 18 to 24 inches, if you believe forecasters - begin to fall. State Highway Administration spokeswoman Valerie Burnette Edgar said road crews in most of the state spent Thursday applying salt brine intended to slow freezing on the roads.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
A thick, viscous fluid that is made from sugar beets, looks and feels like motor oil and smells a bit like instant coffee is part of the State Highway Administration's plans to keep Maryland roadways free of snow and ice this winter. The molasses-based substance, known as Ice Bite, will be used in a pilot project in Frederick and Howard counties to test its effectiveness in pre-treating highways before spraying salt. Highway officials at the agency's annual Snow Show on Monday said the product will be added to salt brine to help it adhere to pavement for a longer period.
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 12, 2008
Autumn is my favorite time of year. I love the changing leaves, the cool temperatures, decorating with pumpkins and having a wide variety of vegetables in season. Root vegetables like squash, rutabagas, turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets are all at their peak now. They not only are plentiful, but are powerhouses of nutrients. Take beets, for instance. They are loaded with iron, potassium, calcium and zinc. I know beets don't make it on most lists of favorite foods, but I grew up eating them.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
Food 2.0: Secrets From the Chef Who Fed Google By Charlie Ayers DK Publishing / $25 / 2008 Along with the many perks offered employees of the juggernaut that is Google, you've probably heard about the fantastic food - healthful, plentiful and free - that's offered at the search engine's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters. The theory: Engineers will be less likely to take time to leave campus for lunch and more full of brain power to boost Google's billions. Charlie Ayers was the chef who started it all, signing on when Google had fewer than 100 employees.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 30, 2000
Long before there were climate-controlled crispers, the root cellar kept the kitchen supplied with fresh vegetables during the cold months. Carrots, beets and other edible roots are still good keepers, staying crisp and sweet for weeks if properly stored. Shredded or diced for salads, their fresh color and flavor brighten winter meals. In this recipe, the earthy sweetness of the beets balances the slight bitterness of the endive and the tang of the vinaigrette. This dressing is thicker than most vinaigrettes.
FEATURES
By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | March 5, 1997
Tell Marc Cassel you don't like beets, and you'll end up eating your words. That's what happened to the staff at Dallas' Green Room restaurant, where he is executive chef."
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