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Beetle Bailey

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FEATURES
July 29, 1992
In our recent survey, "For Better or For Worse" was voted best-liked comic with 80.5 percent of readers' votes.Here are the other results:"Sally Forth" -- 77.3 percent."
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | July 1, 2001
Birthday Party Baltimore has "The Star-Spangled Banner" and Washington has that whole nation's capital thing, but Philadelphia is the place to be on Independence Day. After all, the country's forefathers drafted and ratified the Declaration of Independence there, and it is home to the Liberty Bell (which was cracked and repaired at least three separate times before being permanently retired from ringing in 1846). This year, the City of Brotherly Love expects more than 4 million visitors for the nation's 225th birthday party.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 4, 2001
"Mort Walker's Private Scrapbook: Celebrating a Life of Love and Laughter" by Mort Walker (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 323 pages, $29.95). If the United States had official National Living Cultural Treasures and also had a national sense of humor, Mort Walker surely would be high on the list. Beetle Bailey -- with Sarge and other archetypal military antiheroes -- lives on, apparently immortal. Hi and Lois still lead the pack of family comic strips -- neck and neck with Blondie and Dagwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 4, 2001
"Mort Walker's Private Scrapbook: Celebrating a Life of Love and Laughter" by Mort Walker (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 323 pages, $29.95). If the United States had official National Living Cultural Treasures and also had a national sense of humor, Mort Walker surely would be high on the list. Beetle Bailey -- with Sarge and other archetypal military antiheroes -- lives on, apparently immortal. Hi and Lois still lead the pack of family comic strips -- neck and neck with Blondie and Dagwood.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | July 1, 2001
Birthday Party Baltimore has "The Star-Spangled Banner" and Washington has that whole nation's capital thing, but Philadelphia is the place to be on Independence Day. After all, the country's forefathers drafted and ratified the Declaration of Independence there, and it is home to the Liberty Bell (which was cracked and repaired at least three separate times before being permanently retired from ringing in 1846). This year, the City of Brotherly Love expects more than 4 million visitors for the nation's 225th birthday party.
FEATURES
By Ernestine Williams and Ernestine Williams,Cox News Service | April 8, 1993
If you noticed a recurring theme in the comics Monday about some guy named the Yellow Kid, you got a glimpse of the latest campaign for a new series of U.S. postage stamps.Several artists participated in the drive to capture interest in placing historical cartoon characters like the famous Yellow Kid on stamps to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the American comic strip."Beetle Bailey," "Peanuts," "B.C.," "Gasoline Alley," "Blondie" and others referred to the campaign, organized by cartoonist Mort Walker.
FEATURES
By Joe Logan and Joe Logan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 1995
Gary Larson of "The Far Side" was the first to quit, last New Year's Day. Then, in the spring, Berke Breathed, who created "Bloom County" and later "Outland," announced that he, too, was through with comic strips.And tomorrow, the curtain will close on another of the most popular strips in newspapers, "Calvin & Hobbes," about the raucous antics of a 6-year-old boy and his stuffed tiger companion. After 10 years, Bill Watterson, the reclusive creator of "C&H," wants out.What gives? In one year, three comics superstars in the prime of their careers -- Mr. Larson is the oldest at 45 -- will have walked away from strips that are loved by millions and that earned them millions.
FEATURES
By David Altaner and David Altaner,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 20, 1993
Imagine Milton Berle still hopping around in a dress on his own NBC TV show, at the age of 85. Or Sundays with "The New Ed Sullivan Show," starring Regis Philbin. Or a Jack Benny-less "Jack Benny Show," with a 1993 comedian rolling his eyes and making tightwad jokes like the late comedian.Nostalgia is big on television, but not that big. Yet old newspaper strips never seem to die. Dagwood has been stuffing his face with giant sandwiches since the 1930s. Brenda Starr has been the glamorous and feisty red-headed reporter since the 1940s.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Ever since Ponce de Leon, dreamers have ventured to Florida in search of eternal youth -- even if, as it turns out, they usually end up settling for extended old age. But here, amid the retirement condos and early-bird specials, the shuffleboard tournaments and the year-round white shoes, one group may finally have found that Fountain of Youth.Here, Dennis will forever menace. Blondie will shop but never drop at her beloved Tudbury's. Betty and Veronica will plan sock hops at Riverdale High and fight over Archie into the millennium.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
Today, you'll notice some changes in The Sun's features. The comics pages have been revamped, for the first time in nearly 10 years. Before we tinkered with anything, we sought your input. In two recent surveys, we asked for your favorites from the existing lineup and your opinions about some possible new entries. In two weeks, we received more than 8,500 responses. You'll find your top 22 choices still in The Sun. The lowest vote-getters were eliminated to make room for five new comics that received high marks from readers in our poll.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Ever since Ponce de Leon, dreamers have ventured to Florida in search of eternal youth -- even if, as it turns out, they usually end up settling for extended old age. But here, amid the retirement condos and early-bird specials, the shuffleboard tournaments and the year-round white shoes, one group may finally have found that Fountain of Youth.Here, Dennis will forever menace. Blondie will shop but never drop at her beloved Tudbury's. Betty and Veronica will plan sock hops at Riverdale High and fight over Archie into the millennium.
FEATURES
By Joe Logan and Joe Logan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 1995
Gary Larson of "The Far Side" was the first to quit, last New Year's Day. Then, in the spring, Berke Breathed, who created "Bloom County" and later "Outland," announced that he, too, was through with comic strips.And tomorrow, the curtain will close on another of the most popular strips in newspapers, "Calvin & Hobbes," about the raucous antics of a 6-year-old boy and his stuffed tiger companion. After 10 years, Bill Watterson, the reclusive creator of "C&H," wants out.What gives? In one year, three comics superstars in the prime of their careers -- Mr. Larson is the oldest at 45 -- will have walked away from strips that are loved by millions and that earned them millions.
FEATURES
By David Altaner and David Altaner,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 20, 1993
Imagine Milton Berle still hopping around in a dress on his own NBC TV show, at the age of 85. Or Sundays with "The New Ed Sullivan Show," starring Regis Philbin. Or a Jack Benny-less "Jack Benny Show," with a 1993 comedian rolling his eyes and making tightwad jokes like the late comedian.Nostalgia is big on television, but not that big. Yet old newspaper strips never seem to die. Dagwood has been stuffing his face with giant sandwiches since the 1930s. Brenda Starr has been the glamorous and feisty red-headed reporter since the 1940s.
FEATURES
By Ernestine Williams and Ernestine Williams,Cox News Service | April 8, 1993
If you noticed a recurring theme in the comics Monday about some guy named the Yellow Kid, you got a glimpse of the latest campaign for a new series of U.S. postage stamps.Several artists participated in the drive to capture interest in placing historical cartoon characters like the famous Yellow Kid on stamps to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the American comic strip."Beetle Bailey," "Peanuts," "B.C.," "Gasoline Alley," "Blondie" and others referred to the campaign, organized by cartoonist Mort Walker.
FEATURES
July 29, 1992
In our recent survey, "For Better or For Worse" was voted best-liked comic with 80.5 percent of readers' votes.Here are the other results:"Sally Forth" -- 77.3 percent."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
F&M Manufacturing Inc. thinks it can make obsolete the tens of thousands of sentries who protect the country's military bases and secrets.The Westminster-based company has won a $6.6 million contract to develop two fully autonomous robotic security guards for the Army.While these guards of the future look more like a golf carts than Beetle Bailey or RoboCop, they could pack the fighting force of a Rambo.The first robot is expected to be delivered to the Army's Development and Engineering Center at Fort Belvoir, Va., within two years, said Dana E. Caro, the former head of the FBI's Baltimore office who founded F&M in 1991 and serves at its chairman and chief executive.
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