Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBeetle
IN THE NEWS

Beetle

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LAWRENCE DAVID | April 25, 2001
* Editors note: Franz Kafka's 'The Metamorphosis' is the inspiriation for this story about a boy shocked to discover he's changed overnight. Gregory Sampson woke one morning to discover that he had become a giant beetle. He stared into the mirror on the back of his bedroom door. He had a large, purple-brown beetle body. He had two big, dark beetle eyes. He had two long beetle antennae. And six long, thin, hairy beetle legs. Gregory couldn't remember this ever happening before. "Gregory, get dressed and come down for breakfast," his dad called.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Like the arrival of a Medieval plague, alien invaders are knocking on Baltimore's door. No, we are not talking about foreign armies storming the beaches or bug-eyed creatures from outer space bent on global domination. But it's almost as bad. We are referring, of course, to the recent appearance in Baltimore of the emerald ash borer, a species of voracious Asian beetle that since 2006 has killed millions of white and green ash trees in its relentless march across North America. In June, city arborists trapped a couple of the critters in Druid Hill Park, a sure sign that more are on the way. If nothing is done, some 290,000 ash trees on city owned property could be at risk of being wiped out over the next few years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Diane Cardwell and Diane Cardwell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 17, 2002
NEW YORK - Fulfilling the long-held fears of New York city officials and arborphiles, the Asian longhorned beetle, a voracious insect that has threatened vast swaths of trees in New York, Chicago and Europe, has for the first time surfaced among the prized maples of Central Park. Two infected trees, one Norway maple and one sugar maple, were discovered within a nature sanctuary at the southern end of the park at the end of January, officials said. "This is a serious thing for parks - you could potentially lose your parks over this," Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
A voracious Asian beetle that's killed millions of ash trees across North America has finally been spotted in Baltimore, posing a costly and difficult challenge for a city that stands to lose more than 200,000 of its most common trees to the exotic pest's onslaught. It could denude blocks lined with ash and cost the city millions of dollars to remove dead or dying trees from public lands, while homeowners may be forced to pay hundreds or even thousands to treat or replace their vulnerable trees.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
Under any other circumstances, we might admire their striking metallic green and bronze uniforms and their tenacious grip. But Japanese beetles are back this year in astonishing numbers. They're gobbling up linden tree leaves, rose bushes and vegetable gardens, and they're hooking up with each other at a furious rate. Steve Black, who started a tree nursery this year in Adamstown, near Frederick, likens the infestation at his farm to a biblical plague. "I have them clustered six deep on trees they supposedly don't like," he said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 2002
JERSEY CITY, N.J. - A wood-munching beetle that has destroyed thousands of trees in New York City and Chicago has been found in New Jersey, causing concern that its damage may spread. Federal and state agricultural officials said that they found the Asian longhorned beetles inside 98 trees on a 9-acre plot here among apartment and office towers, and concluded that the beetle had probably lived here for several years. All the affected trees, most of them maples, will be destroyed in the spring, said Barry Emens, a supervisor for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2006
Together, we drove past the glorious cornstalks of the Midwest, sped and weaved through the throngs of yellow cabs in Manhattan and spent countless hours in the stop-and-go of the Baltimore and Washington beltways. She is dead now. My beloved 1999 lime-green Volkswagen Beetle, constant companion for a little more than three years, will run no more. As I drove home from work late a few Sundays ago, the timing belt broke. Any mechanic will tell you a worn timing belt is like an IED waiting for an insurgent to hit the switch.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | August 10, 1992
Patches of Maryland's shimmering green forests are turning prematurely brown this summer due to a population explosion of an industrious beetle called the locust leaf miner.The black-and-orange insects have infested black locust trees from the Alleghenies to the Chesapeake Bay in what may be the worst outbreak in five years, plant and bug scientists say. But no one seems particularly concerned.Leaf miners, it seems, are perennial pests that seldom do any lasting damage to the hardy, fast-growing black locust, a tree with no commercial value that grows wild throughout the Eastern United States.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2005
GROVE POINT - Jim Twohy's waterfront home might soon tumble into the Chesapeake Bay from atop a 60-foot cliff. He wants to build a wall to save the house, but some meddlesome neighbors are standing in the way. The neighbors are puritan tiger beetles, a threatened species half an inch long. To protect the bugs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to stop construction of a rock barrier that Twohy and his civic association say is necessary to prevent a half-dozen houses from toppling into the water.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
Sweat beaded on his forehead, 13-year-old Andy Frevert crouches under a bush, poking through leaf litter, green eyes searching intently. Aha! He holds up a luna moth wing. It's in crummy condition, but it's a promising sign. Where you find moths, he says, you will also find beetles. Andy is a fledgling collector. He's among the distinct minority of folks who just can't wait for the whirring of tiny wings. He's mucking around near a large parking lot light, the kind of nightspot bugs can't resist.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
I found a shiny green bug in my yard, and I'm afraid it is the emerald ash borer that is killing ash trees in Maryland. What should I do about my ash tree? The emerald ash borer beetle is rarely seen. It's about 1/2-inch long with a tapering silhouette. Recently, many people are confusing them with green tiger beetles. This voracious predator of other insects is 1/2- to 3/4-inch long, with an abdomen wider than the head and thorax and six white spots on the abdomen - a good guy in your landscape, though its powerful jaws can nip. For guidance on identifying emerald ash borers and symptoms, observing the quarantine on ash wood, and deciding on treatment of a valuable ash tree, go to extension.umd.edu/hgic/invasives/emerald-ash-borer . I'd been watering my new dogwood for 45 minutes a day like I was told to do, but I forgot the hose one day and watered for 50 minutes.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
My neighbor is installing a rain garden. Won't that breed mosquitoes? Isn't it better for rain to run off quickly? Water must sit, unmoving, for three days for mosquitoes to have time to reproduce there. A rain garden empties before then, absorbing rainwater into the permeable soil, down to the roots of water-loving plants. Yes, rainwater must drain away from a home, but slowly is the operative word. Fast run-off can't be absorbed by your lawn or by your plants' roots, meaning the same plants may still need to be watered.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
The tips of my red raspberry canes wilted. They've always been so healthy; what's happening? It's not lack of water. The female raspberry cane borer is a beetle that punctures the cane about 6 inches below the tip to lay its eggs, causing tips to wilt and die. When larvae hatch, they tunnel down the cane and by the second year they are damaging the base and roots. The remedy is simple: prune out all wilted tips below the larvae. You can slit open a cane to see how far they have progressed or just prune out at least several inches below the dead tip. Destroy pruned tips.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Last spring I received a small azalea plant. I kept it outside in the pot all summer and recently brought it indoors. Should its nut-like nodules — maybe next year's buds or last year's flower remnants — be removed? Suggestions for overwintering the plant? Leave the "nodules"; they're probably buds. Always move your plant gradually from one temperature to another, whether indoors to outdoors or from room to room indoors, to lessen adjustment shock. Keep your azalea in medium to bright light but not direct sunlight and as cool as possible.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 22, 2012
With Memorial Day about to kick off the unofficial start of summer, agriculture officials are warning the public not to take firewood with them if they go on camping or cookout trips - those logs could harbor some unseen, tree-destroying hitchhikers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has declared this Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week, in hopes it will slow the spread of this destructive beetle from Asia, which officials say has killed tens of millions of ash trees so far. Probably brought in on some imported packing material, the borer was first spotted in Michigan in 2002, but has spread to 14 other states since, including Maryland.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
A shipment of Indian cumin seed contaminated with the larvae of a dead Khapra beetle, an invasive insect, never made it to McCormick & Co.'s Hunt Valley facility and was to be sent back to India, the spice maker said Tuesday. U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered the larvae and other seed contaminants during a search of the shipment at the port of Baltimore on April 17. The next day, the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed that the insect was a Khapra beetle, considered one of the most destructive pests, damaging grain, cereals and stored food.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
For what may have been thousands of years, a colony of tiny scavenger beetles scuttled among the rotting leaves on the shore of a pond in Seth State Forest near Easton. Then civilization caught up with them.About 1982, state Department of Natural Resources foresters, unaware that the rare beetles were there, bulldozed the shore as part of a plan to attract nesting wood ducks to the pond. In 1984, another forestry crew cut some trees in the nearby woods to promote the growth of other timber.
NEWS
By Eun Lee Koh and Eun Lee Koh,NEW YORKTIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2000
NEW YORK - Asian longhorned beetles, which have destroyed nearly 3,000 trees in New York City since their first appearance in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn four years ago, have invaded the trees that line Luther Gulick Playground near the Williamsburg Bridge, Parks Commissioner Henry Stern says. The infected trees at least six of the parks 34 Norway maples will be removed immediately, he said. The beetles pose an enormous long-term danger to the citys forests and to trees all along the Northeast, Stern said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
The Obama administration announced Wednesday it is providing $2.4 million to protect endangered Puritan beetles living in cliffs overlooking the Chesapeake Bay. The land acquired in Calvert and Cecil counties with the federal grant boosts the rare insect's chances of survival, officials said. But it also gives a ray of hope to Calvert bayfront homeowners who've been barred from shoring up their crumbling cliffs because of the federally protected beetles on their property. The grant, among $53 million in payouts for endangered species protection nationally, would be paid to six landowners in the two counties for easements guaranteeing that rare beetle habitat on more than 450 acres would remain permanently undisturbed.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
U.S. Customs agents intercepted a 24-ton shipment of Pakistani rice infested by a destructive crop pest this week at the port of Baltimore — just days before a federal quarantine on such imports was scheduled to begin. The Customs and Border Protection agency reported that its agents found dead Khapra beetles, a species that has been showing up in rice imports with growing frequency, aboard a ship Tuesday. The agency said a scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the identification of the insect the following day. Restrictions on imports of rice from countries where Khapra beetle infestations are known to occur go into effect Saturday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.