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By Stephen Wigler | March 28, 1996
Here's an index to how much the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra respects Gunther Herbig: He's the only conductor, aside from BSO music director David Zinman, who's permitted to lead the orchestra in Beethoven symphonies.The German-born conductor will conduct the mightiest and last of the nine symphonies tonight and tomorrow night in Meyerhoff Hall. To open the program, cello soloist Carter Brey will join Herbig and the BSO in Haydn's Concerto in C.The concert is tonight and tomorrow night at 8: 15 at the Meyerhoff, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $18 to $51. Call (410)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
In the grand scheme of themes, we have more than enough recordings of Beethoven symphonies. But there always seems to be room for one more. I would gladly clear a spot on an overstuffed CD shelf for a version of Beethoven's Fifth and Seventh symphonies recently released on the Soli Deo Gloria label, recorded live at Carnegie Hall by New York's classical station radio WQXR. This disc captures the Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique and its conductor, John Eliot Gardiner, at a white-hot peak of expressive fervor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 3, 1993
One thing proved by last night's all-Beethoven program by the Baltimore Symphony and its music director, David Zinman, in Meyerhoff Hall is that this is an orchestra that can play.Any ensemble and its conductor that can accurately play the Fourth Symphony at such whiplash speed deserves honor. That they made the performance so musical means they deserve even more.Zinman, of course, has always led the Beethoven symphonies at unusually brisk speeds, but this Beethoven Fourth was faster than any I can remember -- and that includes the Toscanini and Norrington recordings.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | June 21, 2008
Marin Alsop's inaugural season as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is ending pretty much the way it started, with a program that places a sizable contemporary American work alongside a blockbuster from the standard European canon. In this case, the former is Joan Tower's big and often bracing Concerto for Orchestra; the latter is Beethoven's Symphony No. 9. The results Thursday night at the Music Center at Strathmore were also pretty much the same as at the season launch back in September - a hot performance of the modern piece, something less than a totally persuasive account of the venerable classic.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 1996
Baltimore Symphony music director David Zinman occasionally gets to work with pianists who share his ideas about Beethoven's symphonic music. But it was not until last night in Meyerhoff Hall that one got to hear what might happen if this conductor worked with a like-minded violinist.The violinist was Christian Tetzlaff, and the performance of Beethoven's Violin Concerto that resulted was as wonderful as it was refreshing. As Zinman has, the young German violinist has clearly been influenced by recent scholarship about performance practice in the classical era. He used less vibrato than one customarily hears in performances of this music; he used less of the bow; and his tempos were brisk.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 10, 1998
"Yes, indeed, and what's really remarkable is that every jackass notices it at once," Brahms replied to one of the many critics who had pointed out to him the similarity between the "Ode to Joy" theme in the final movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and the lyrical theme in the finale of Brahms' own First Symphony.Brahms was never one to suffer fools gladly, and his irritation is particularly understandable in light of his 20-year-long struggle to write a symphony in the shadow of Beethoven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
In the grand scheme of themes, we have more than enough recordings of Beethoven symphonies. But there always seems to be room for one more. I would gladly clear a spot on an overstuffed CD shelf for a version of Beethoven's Fifth and Seventh symphonies recently released on the Soli Deo Gloria label, recorded live at Carnegie Hall by New York's classical station radio WQXR. This disc captures the Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique and its conductor, John Eliot Gardiner, at a white-hot peak of expressive fervor.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 2004
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, a significant player in the local music scene for more than 20 years, started a new chapter Wednesday night with Markand Thakar's first appearance as music director. He's only the second person to occupy the podium of this ensemble, founded and conducted by Anne Harrigan, and comes with solid credentials. He's co-director of the graduate conducting program at the Peabody Conservatory and music director of the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra. There's nothing like an all-Beethoven program to test any conductor's mettle.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | June 21, 2008
Marin Alsop's inaugural season as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is ending pretty much the way it started, with a program that places a sizable contemporary American work alongside a blockbuster from the standard European canon. In this case, the former is Joan Tower's big and often bracing Concerto for Orchestra; the latter is Beethoven's Symphony No. 9. The results Thursday night at the Music Center at Strathmore were also pretty much the same as at the season launch back in September - a hot performance of the modern piece, something less than a totally persuasive account of the venerable classic.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | October 9, 1994
Beethoven, the Nine Symphonies. Franz Konwitschny, Leipzig Radio Chorus, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. Berlin Classics 0020 005 (six CDs; also includes overtures to "Coriolan," "Fidelio," "Creatures of Prometheus" and "Leonore" I-III)Beethoven, The Nine Symphonies. John Eliot Gardner, the Monteverdi Choir, Orchestre Revolutionaire et Romantique. Archiv 439-900-2 (five CDs and a bonus interview CD)At first it appears that these two sets of Beethoven symphonies should be polar opposites. We have the Leipzig Gewandhaus, )
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 5, 2008
As a longtime, thankfully incurable sufferer of Mahlerian fever, I found last weekend's lineup at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall an irresistible draw - Mahler's Symphony No. 6 on Saturday night performed by the National Symphony Orchestra, and No. 5 on Sunday afternoon performed by the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra from Amsterdam, the Netherlands. NSO music director Leonard Slatkin has never impressed me more than on this occasion. He conveyed the weight of the Sixth - it's not commonly known as the "Tragic" Symphony for nothing - without wallowing in the dark side, always allowing lyrical contrasts plenty of ecstatic release.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 2004
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, a significant player in the local music scene for more than 20 years, started a new chapter Wednesday night with Markand Thakar's first appearance as music director. He's only the second person to occupy the podium of this ensemble, founded and conducted by Anne Harrigan, and comes with solid credentials. He's co-director of the graduate conducting program at the Peabody Conservatory and music director of the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra. There's nothing like an all-Beethoven program to test any conductor's mettle.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 10, 1998
"Yes, indeed, and what's really remarkable is that every jackass notices it at once," Brahms replied to one of the many critics who had pointed out to him the similarity between the "Ode to Joy" theme in the final movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and the lyrical theme in the finale of Brahms' own First Symphony.Brahms was never one to suffer fools gladly, and his irritation is particularly understandable in light of his 20-year-long struggle to write a symphony in the shadow of Beethoven.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 1996
Baltimore Symphony music director David Zinman occasionally gets to work with pianists who share his ideas about Beethoven's symphonic music. But it was not until last night in Meyerhoff Hall that one got to hear what might happen if this conductor worked with a like-minded violinist.The violinist was Christian Tetzlaff, and the performance of Beethoven's Violin Concerto that resulted was as wonderful as it was refreshing. As Zinman has, the young German violinist has clearly been influenced by recent scholarship about performance practice in the classical era. He used less vibrato than one customarily hears in performances of this music; he used less of the bow; and his tempos were brisk.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 10, 1996
In Tuesday's articles about the resignation of Baltimore Symphony Orchestra conductor David Zinman, two photo captions contained incorrect information. In one, Harvey M. Meyerhoff was misidentified; in the other, the caption should have referred to Zinman's return from a sabbatical in September 1995.The Sun regrets the errors.In the aftermath of David Zinman's resignation yesterday as music director of the Baltimore Symphony, there are two ways to think about the future of the orchestra.Optimists will point out how attractive an ensemble he will leave behind in June 1998.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1996
Beethoven's towering Ninth Symphony is a musical expedition from which many orchestras with higher pedigrees than the Annapolis Symphony have failed to return alive.So it is with admirable pluck -- if not downright chutzpah -- that an ensemble like the ASO takes a crack at Beethoven's inimitable valedictory address every few years.The offering last weekend at Maryland Hall, the first-ever led by Gisele Ben-Dor, was in some ways, distinguished, in others, not. But it certainly was worth doing and hearing.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 5, 2008
As a longtime, thankfully incurable sufferer of Mahlerian fever, I found last weekend's lineup at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall an irresistible draw - Mahler's Symphony No. 6 on Saturday night performed by the National Symphony Orchestra, and No. 5 on Sunday afternoon performed by the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra from Amsterdam, the Netherlands. NSO music director Leonard Slatkin has never impressed me more than on this occasion. He conveyed the weight of the Sixth - it's not commonly known as the "Tragic" Symphony for nothing - without wallowing in the dark side, always allowing lyrical contrasts plenty of ecstatic release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | March 28, 1996
Here's an index to how much the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra respects Gunther Herbig: He's the only conductor, aside from BSO music director David Zinman, who's permitted to lead the orchestra in Beethoven symphonies.The German-born conductor will conduct the mightiest and last of the nine symphonies tonight and tomorrow night in Meyerhoff Hall. To open the program, cello soloist Carter Brey will join Herbig and the BSO in Haydn's Concerto in C.The concert is tonight and tomorrow night at 8: 15 at the Meyerhoff, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $18 to $51. Call (410)
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