Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBeer
IN THE NEWS

Beer

NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
It's 30 minutes before game time at Camden Yards, and Greg Schwalenberg peers out at the vast expanse of empty green seats. He grimaces. "What kind of crowd are they expecting?" he asks a nearby usher. "Let's see, 10,000," the man replies. "It's been this way most of the season," Schwalenberg says with a weary smile. Schwalenberg has sold beer at Orioles games for 31 years, and he knows that with four empty seats for every one filled, he'll have to scramble all over the outfield stands to sell enough Budweisers and Bud Lights to turn a solid profit for the evening.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
This time, The Brewer's Art went with a local celebrity of sorts. After receiving a cease-and-desist letter on behalf of musician Ozzy Osbourne, the Baltimore brewery has renamed its Ozzy beer Beazly, said co-owner Tom Creegan on Tuesday afternoon. It is named after Mark Barcus, a bartender of the Mount Vernon bar for nearly 17 years. His nickname around the bar is Beazly, Creegan said. "The running joke joke was if you worked here long enough, you don't get a gold watch - you get a gold ale," Creegan said.  The company submitted the proposed name change to Osbourne's representatives, Creegan said, and they approved it. Earlier this month, The Brewer's Art asked customers to submit potential new names for the beer (which will keep the same recipe)
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Full Tilt Brewing, Baltimore's newest craft beer producer, will release its flagship beer, Baltimore Pale Ale, on Saturday at the Americana in Canton. The release party will be held from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., and the first pint of Baltimore Pale Ale will be poured at 8 p.m. Baltimore Pale Ale pints will be sold for $2 all night. The founders and co-owners of Full Tilt Brewing are cousins Nick Fertig and Dan Baumiller. Full Tilt will also be launching its community support program at the release party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Brewer's Cask, the new Federal Hill beer outpost, is finally open. Owner Jason Stevens said the bar opened last Thursday, the same morning the bar got its liquor license. But some of its amenities weren't immediately fully operational. The registers were only taking cash and the kegs hadn't arrived. Everything's up and running now, Stevens said. Last Fall, Brewer's took over the space where Muggsys's had been until June, when owner Danny Young closed because the bar had been struggling financiall y. He blamed competition from neighborhood bars, like The Abbey and Metropolitan.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2012
The big spring training story of the past few days comes not from the Orioles' winter home in Sarasota, Fla., but from down the road in Fort Myers, where news that the Boston Red Soxhave banned beer in the clubhouse seems to have everyone in a tizzy. Pundits are pontificating about it, new manager Bobby Valentine is explaining it and the Red Sox players have been asked about it endlessly. (A personal favorite quote from veteran slugger David Ortiz: "We're not here to drink.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 21, 2011
Early patrons to the Preakness found themselves locked out right out of the gate. A glitch at the 8 a.m. opening prevented tickets from being scanned in. About 100 people anxiously waited for a fix, which came promptly at 8:11 a.m. Sun photographer Gene Sweeney Jr. reported that one man appeared angry, but the rest streamed into the track without a problem.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 8, 2013
This weekend will be one of the biggest of the summer in Harford County, what with the Cal Ripken World Series in Aberdeen, the Maryland BBQ Bash in Bel Air and the Havre de Grace Seafood Festival all slated to start Friday. In addition to the World Series opening night activities and inaugural game at Cal Sr.'s Yard, opening night of the two-day BBQ Bash offers plenty of live entertainment, food and drink and in Havre de Grace, the Oak Ridge Boys are the headliner for the Seafood Festival's opening night concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | sam.sessa@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 20, 2010
Every spring for six years, Derek Lofti joined the crowd at Pimlico Race Course's packed infield for Baltimore's biggest outdoor party. But last year, when the Maryland Jockey Club banned outside beverages, Lofti, a 29-year-old who lives in Baltimore, stayed home. "The whole mystique of the day was gone," he said. "It wasn't the Preakness we were used to going to." This year, organizers are adding a dash of debauchery to the infield to lure back the thousands of lost revelers such as Lofti.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
The roadside root beer stand's orange contours memorialize this venerated shrine to a different era. Its fans make pilgrimages to this Stewart's franchise on Pulaski Highway, a truck-battered stretch of U.S. 40 in eastern Baltimore County, to recall the food experiences of their youth. This is the place where it seemed a little cooler in the days before broiling city neighborhoods such as Highlandtown or Canton had air conditioning. Suburban Rosedale was the summer destination when the sun was bright, the humidity was high and school was a distant notion.
SPORTS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
At the infield fence near the turn for the last quarter-mile, Dan Stachura, John Reckner and their friends had marked off a prime piece of real estate with the same type of yellow tape used at homicide scenes. Their only complaint: The limited beer selection at Pimlico is a crime. Stachura, 43, and Reckner, 48, gave the race course managers some credit for improvement -- noting that the selection is no longer limited to Bud and Bud Light. "They have an older, more mature crowd that's not worried about spending money," Reckner said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.