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By Michael Dresser | November 25, 2009
So I walk into my local wine shop, and there's a woman there pouring samples of the best dry Maryland table wines I've ever tasted. The winery is called Black Ankle, and this extraordinary red isn't necessarily the best of them - just the one with the greatest availability. (Seek out high-end wine shops or call the winery at 301-829-3338.) The Rolling Hills blend - made up of traditional Bordeaux varietal with a dollop of pinot noir and syrah - is incredibly smooth, complex and elegant.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 25, 2009
So I walk into my local wine shop, and there's a woman there pouring samples of the best dry Maryland table wines I've ever tasted. The winery is called Black Ankle, and this extraordinary red isn't necessarily the best of them - just the one with the greatest availability. (Seek out high-end wine shops or call the winery at 301-829-3338.) The Rolling Hills blend - made up of traditional Bordeaux varietal with a dollop of pinot noir and syrah - is incredibly smooth, complex and elegant.
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FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
The St. James luxury condominium homes and Baltimore-area celebrities joined forces recently to share summer entertaining secrets while raising money for charity. "A Perfect Setting" which takes place throughout the St. James decorated models, located at 3704 N. Charles St., runs through June 10.The event, open to the public and free of charge, features seasonal tabletops and patio set-ups designed by local celebrities. The St. James will make a donation to the charity of each participating celebrity's choice, such as Animal Rescue, The Baltimore School for the Arts and House of Ruth-Baltimore Inc. For more information call 467-3704.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2009
Polly Ailor Tucker of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe of her late mother's for what she called "Pittsburg Potatoes." While she watched and even helped make the dish over the years, it's been too long for her to remember the specifics. She says the dish was a mainstay at her mother's dinner parties and that "it is legend among all those who joined us at the dinner table." Carol Rohn of Cockeysville had the recipe Tucker was searching for, and she said that this was a favorite dish while she was growing up. I tested the dish using a good-quality sharp cheddar cheese, which gave it a nice, rich flavor.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | July 11, 1993
Bean Cuisine it's a naturalSalt and pepper, sugar and spice, turkey and stuffing, basi and tomatoes -- the culinary world is full of natural pairings. Grains with legumes is a pair increasingly popular, as people learn the tenets of healthful eating. A new product that makes it easy to enjoy this carbohydrate-rich combination is Bean Cuisine Pasta & Beans. There are four mixes: Mediterranean Black Beans With Fusilli; Barcelona Red Beans With Radiatore; Country French Beans With Gemelli; and Florentine Beans With Bow Ties.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | December 18, 1991
One of the best presents you can give yourself during this hectic season is a meal you can get on the table quickly so there's time to do all the holiday have-tos -- from shopping to tree decorating to party going.The following Thai beef salad from the Murphy-Goode Estate Winery in California's Alexander Valley is a great option for busy cooks because it tastes even better the second time around. Those with small families can serve half the food one night and the other half the next, after the beef has even more time to marinate in the wonderful combination of Thai ingredients.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 17, 2001
If you're a meat lover, you know that a dinner at a steak restaurant is a rare treat. You'll be seduced by steak cuts with a quality that you probably won't see in your supermarket. Prime meat is usually reserved for food service. But what are you to do when you crave a hunk of meat in the comfort of your kitchen? My solution is opt for beef tenderloin. It doesn't have to be prime to be tender. I ask the butcher for 1-inch-thick slices. A balsamic-vinegar marinade and blast of heat are the secrets for getting the best flavor from this meat.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 16, 1999
When a good friend called to say she would be in town to visit her son, who attends college nearby, I invited her to stay with us. I planned meals for the entire weekend, but as it turned out, her offspring, unenthusiastic about his dorm food, had his heart set on dining out in several area restaurants. His mother willingly complied, but it meant that my husband and I were able to share only one meal -- Sunday lunch -- with her.Our friend indulged in all manner of ethnic foods, including Italian, Mexican and French, during her brief visit with her son, but mentioned that what she longed for most was meat and potatoes.
FEATURES
By Gerald Etter and Gerald Etter,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1992
"Great Food Without Fuss" (Holt, $25) is a compilation of favorite recipes culled from the kitchens of 70 great cooks, such as Diana Kennedy and Julia Child.The book focuses on dishes that can be made quickly with minimum effort. Authors Frances McCullough, a cookbook editor, and Barbara Witt, a food consultant and former restaurateur, include their own recipes, plus general cooking tips.The structure of the book allows the reader to use it strictly as a recipe collection, or to take suggestions to improvise.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | May 29, 1991
Everyone knows that baseball and hot dogs go together, but what about baseball and grilled swordfish with fresh vegetable salsa, saffron potatoes and cilantro butter?Or how about watching nine innings as you dine on roast beef tenderloin with vegetable turnovers and natural Cabernet sauvignon glace, or a plate of fresh mozzarella with Italian herb pesto, ripe tomatoes and roasted sweet peppers?Welcome to the gourmet restaurant in the ballpark at Camden Yards.Starting next April, the baseball stadium designed to recall an era of old-fashioned innocence will offer a menu that is modern nouvelle cuisine.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | March 12, 2008
Meat in the middle. Soul on the edge. Pork belly inspires thoughts like that for me. Maybe it's just the fat rushing to my brain. But when I introduce someone to pork belly - to soft meat surrounded by fat that is meltingly tender on the inside and crisp on the outside - what I usually hear (through the moans) is, "That is to die for." "Yes," I reply cheerfully. "And with that in your arteries, it won't be long." Pork belly, of all things, has become a food-world darling. Wait - isn't pork belly the stuff that's traded as a commodity on Wall Street?
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 24, 2005
I love New Year's Eve celebrations, and during the 1990s my husband and I hosted a small dinner each year. Then for several years on Dec. 31 we were on the other side of the Atlantic in Paris, where we dined out or accepted invitations from Parisians who shared splendid meals with us. This year we'll be on American shores, staying with friends in Washington, D.C. Although our hosts proposed eating out, I suggested that a simple meal we could prepare together...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2003
There's a new Inner Harbor restaurant. And you could say it's located between a rock and a hard place. Or, more accurately, between the Hard Rock Cafe and a place known as the National Aquarium. Pier 4 opens its doors tomorrow in a brand new building, where the old Chart House restaurant used to be on - you guessed it -Pier 4 in the Inner Harbor. Pier 4 is the farthest foray East for Chicago restaurateur Roger Greenfield, best known for his chain of Bar Louie eateries located throughout the Windy City and the midsection of the United States.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 4, 2001
Do you have a soft spot in your heart for funky little restaurants? Do you wish there were more places that serve intriguing food for under $15? And do you have a forgiving nature? Then Genevieve's, the full-service Fells Point restaurant that Margaret's Cafe Open has metamorphosed into, may be just the place for you. But if you're the kind of person who'll be bothered that the miniature bathroom sink is in the hallway, not the bathroom, then read no further. This is not the place for you. If you order your beef tenderloin medium rare and then expect it to arrive at the table medium rare, this may not be the place for you either.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 17, 2001
If you're a meat lover, you know that a dinner at a steak restaurant is a rare treat. You'll be seduced by steak cuts with a quality that you probably won't see in your supermarket. Prime meat is usually reserved for food service. But what are you to do when you crave a hunk of meat in the comfort of your kitchen? My solution is opt for beef tenderloin. It doesn't have to be prime to be tender. I ask the butcher for 1-inch-thick slices. A balsamic-vinegar marinade and blast of heat are the secrets for getting the best flavor from this meat.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 16, 1999
When a good friend called to say she would be in town to visit her son, who attends college nearby, I invited her to stay with us. I planned meals for the entire weekend, but as it turned out, her offspring, unenthusiastic about his dorm food, had his heart set on dining out in several area restaurants. His mother willingly complied, but it meant that my husband and I were able to share only one meal -- Sunday lunch -- with her.Our friend indulged in all manner of ethnic foods, including Italian, Mexican and French, during her brief visit with her son, but mentioned that what she longed for most was meat and potatoes.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 24, 2005
I love New Year's Eve celebrations, and during the 1990s my husband and I hosted a small dinner each year. Then for several years on Dec. 31 we were on the other side of the Atlantic in Paris, where we dined out or accepted invitations from Parisians who shared splendid meals with us. This year we'll be on American shores, staying with friends in Washington, D.C. Although our hosts proposed eating out, I suggested that a simple meal we could prepare together...
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 4, 2001
Do you have a soft spot in your heart for funky little restaurants? Do you wish there were more places that serve intriguing food for under $15? And do you have a forgiving nature? Then Genevieve's, the full-service Fells Point restaurant that Margaret's Cafe Open has metamorphosed into, may be just the place for you. But if you're the kind of person who'll be bothered that the miniature bathroom sink is in the hallway, not the bathroom, then read no further. This is not the place for you. If you order your beef tenderloin medium rare and then expect it to arrive at the table medium rare, this may not be the place for you either.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
Dining at Ciao on West Street is sort of like meeting an intelligent, handsome and unbelievably wealthy man, then finding out that he steps on ants, lies compulsively or has some other horrendous flaw.The ambience is wonderful. With its windows in the style of an old English apothecary, warm, pastel walls and sturdy wood tables draped with table cloths so freshly pressed you can almost smell the steam, the 2-year-old restaurant feels like a secret hideaway from the hubbub of West Street.There is, however, a big negative to the place -- its food was merely above average and spotty in quality.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,Universal Press Syndicate | March 25, 1998
Perhaps you can remember the moment. Maybe it was recent. The moment you discovered that tuna does not always come in a can.You may have been at a trendy restaurant where great fish takes center stage. When the tuna came to the table, it might have been rolled in crushed black pepper, then fanned out in slices, each flashing its rosy center. And when you took a bite, it was as soft and tender and red as a piece of rare tenderloin.No wonder the American appetite for fish has grown bigger than Moby Dick.
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