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Beef Stew

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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2005
Helen Dahlquist from Salem, Ore., was looking for an easy recipe for oven stew. Both Karen Bain of Silverton, Ore., and B.J. Martin of Keiser, Ore., sent in a recipe for "Stay-a-bed Stew" from the I Hate to Cook Book, by Peg Bracken. As the author says in her notes, this recipe is for "those days when you're en negligee, en bed, with a murder story and a box of bonbons, or possibly a good case of flu." This is a truly simple, yet delicious, recipe for beef stew. And unlike many beef-stew recipes, it is not necessary to brown the beef first.
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ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
From: Barossa Valley, Australia Price: $21 Serve with: Grilled meat, beef stew, lasagna This is a red wine whose flavors truly convey an image of the vines: squat, weathered old bushes with small yields of fat, ripe grapes. There's that old-vine concentration of gamy, meaty, earth flavors and dense blackberry fruit. It's a lush, intense wine with a creamy texture and a burly elegance. It's a total pleasure and well worth the above-average price. -- Michael Dresser
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
In the 1960s, Evelyn Rosenthal of Baltimore had a recipe for beef stew bourbonnaise which, she says, was a favorite of "my husband and children. It was given out by the French ambassador's wife and called for chuck beef cubes, ketchup, wine, spices, tomato sauce and more. I've lost it or given it away and would like your help."Her answer came from Arlene Rosenthal, "no relation," of Columbia who found this recipe in a cookbook titled "Cooking is an Art." "Note the ketchup and maybe the soup does not sound authentically French but this could be the one she is looking for," she wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2010
Jessie Thomas of Ellicott City sent in a request for a recipe for an "old-fashioned" beef stew. Mildred Wise of Baltimore shared a recipe she says she has been using for more than 50 years for beef stew that sounds like what Thomas is looking for. It is a basic recipe, nothing fancy, but tried and true. Her recipe instructions have the stew cooked atop the stove in a Dutch oven. I have found that beef stew works just as well when made in a slow cooker or low oven. You can follow the same basic instructions, but if using a slow cooker, brown the meat on the stove top and then transfer it to the slow cooker with the rest of the ingredients.
FEATURES
December 26, 1990
This delicious, filling recipe takes about 20 minutes to prepare and one hour to cook, perfect for long, cold winter nights.Chuckwagon Beef Stew 1 pound beef round, cut into 3/4 -inch cubesSalt and pepper1 tablespoon vegetable oil1 large onion, coarsely chopped1 garlic clove, minced1/2 teaspoon marjoram1 bay leaf1 pound red potatoes, cut into one-inch chunks2 large carrots, thickly sliced1/4 pound green beans, cut into 1-inch lengthsSeason beef lightly with...
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2003
Four decades ago, television was a minor but growing presence in American life, and "educational" television was just that - educational and even somewhat dull. But it proved to be the perfect vehicle for a tall, cheerful woman with a warbly voice and unencumbered enthusiasm. The French Chef, Julia Child's first cooking series, debuted 40 years ago this month on WGBH, Boston's public television station, with an episode devoted to that classic French stew, boeuf bourguignon. Around the country local chapters of the American Institute of Wine and Food, co-founded by Julia Child, gathered last night to celebrate that cultural milestone by watching a tape of the show and dining on boeuf bourguignon.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | October 18, 2006
This lush, rich red wine represents one of the best values around in California syrah. It's a beefy but soft-textured wine with chewy blackberry fruit, a hint of black raspberry and a dollop of chocolate and coffee. This is an impressive wine that is appealing now but should age well for five years or more. Serve with beef stew, prime rib or game.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 11, 2009
The full-bodied, smooth wine from Argentina is simply packed with robust flavors of blackberry, cassis, chocolate and coffee. It's much like a fine vintage port without the sweetness. The fruit is so intense and rounded, the 14.9 percent alcohol is barely perceptible. A screw cap ensures no cork problems. 2008 Layer Cake Malbec From: Mendoza, Argentina Price: $15 Serve with: Beef stew, lasagna
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
From: Barossa Valley, Australia Price: $21 Serve with: Grilled meat, beef stew, lasagna This is a red wine whose flavors truly convey an image of the vines: squat, weathered old bushes with small yields of fat, ripe grapes. There's that old-vine concentration of gamy, meaty, earth flavors and dense blackberry fruit. It's a lush, intense wine with a creamy texture and a burly elegance. It's a total pleasure and well worth the above-average price. -- Michael Dresser
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | January 2, 2002
Item: Homestyle Bakes from Banquet What you get: 4 to 5 servings Cost: About $4.75 Nutritional content: Beef Stew -- 270 calories, 6 grams fat, 2 grams saturated fat, 970 milligrams sodium, 43 grams carbohydrate, 6 grams sugars; Creamy Turkey and Stuffing -- 340 calories, 16 grams fat, 3.5 grams saturated fat, 1,290 milligrams sodium, 41 grams carbohydrate, 7 grams sugars Preparation time: 35 to 45 minutes in oven Review: Friends whose culinary taste...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser | November 11, 2009
From: Mendoza, Argentina Price: $15 Serve with: Beef stew, lasagna The full-bodied, smooth wine from Argentina is simply packed with robust flavors of blackberry, cassis, chocolate and coffee. It's much like a fine vintage port without the sweetness. The fruit is so intense and rounded, the 14.9 percent alcohol is barely perceptible. A screw cap ensures no cork problems. Recipe search   Search over 3,000 recipes in our archive Keywords:    Or choose a date:    Choose ... All to April '02 Feb. 3, 2010 Jan. 27, 2010 Jan. 20, 2010 Jan. 13, 2010 Jan. 6, 2010 Dec. 30, 2009 Dec. 23, 2009 Dec. 16, 2009 Dec. 9, 2009 Dec. 2, 2009 Nov. 25, 2009 Nov. 18, 2009 Nov. 11, 2009 Nov. 4, 2009 Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 21, 2009 Oct. 14, 2009 Oct. 7, 2009 Sept.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 11, 2009
The full-bodied, smooth wine from Argentina is simply packed with robust flavors of blackberry, cassis, chocolate and coffee. It's much like a fine vintage port without the sweetness. The fruit is so intense and rounded, the 14.9 percent alcohol is barely perceptible. A screw cap ensures no cork problems. 2008 Layer Cake Malbec From: Mendoza, Argentina Price: $15 Serve with: Beef stew, lasagna
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 12, 2008
Bake Until Bubbly By Clifford A. Wright The Ski House Cookbook By Tina Anderson and Sarah Pinneo Clarkson Potter / 2007 / $30 If you spend weekends on the slopes and crave something quick yet home-cooked at the end of the day, these 125 recipes are for you. Many involve slow-cookers or minimal prep work, so you can spend the day on your skis instead of behind the stove. Though I hardly ever cook red meat, the photo for Chunky Beef Stew caught my attention. The braised meat heats in the oven for six hours as the vegetables roast in a separate pan, to be combined at the end so they don't get mushy.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | December 4, 2006
This is another story about the old dog who lives in my house and clings to life for the sole purpose of driving me crazy. Here's the new thing the dog is doing now: faking an eating disorder. It began a few months ago, when the dog didn't seem to have his usual appetite and my wife became concerned. "Maybe his teeth are bothering him," she said. "He is 14 years old." There's nothing wrong with the dog's teeth, I told her. This is all an act. Don't fall for this. This is exactly what he wants.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | October 18, 2006
This lush, rich red wine represents one of the best values around in California syrah. It's a beefy but soft-textured wine with chewy blackberry fruit, a hint of black raspberry and a dollop of chocolate and coffee. This is an impressive wine that is appealing now but should age well for five years or more. Serve with beef stew, prime rib or game.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2005
Helen Dahlquist from Salem, Ore., was looking for an easy recipe for oven stew. Both Karen Bain of Silverton, Ore., and B.J. Martin of Keiser, Ore., sent in a recipe for "Stay-a-bed Stew" from the I Hate to Cook Book, by Peg Bracken. As the author says in her notes, this recipe is for "those days when you're en negligee, en bed, with a murder story and a box of bonbons, or possibly a good case of flu." This is a truly simple, yet delicious, recipe for beef stew. And unlike many beef-stew recipes, it is not necessary to brown the beef first.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 12, 2008
Bake Until Bubbly By Clifford A. Wright The Ski House Cookbook By Tina Anderson and Sarah Pinneo Clarkson Potter / 2007 / $30 If you spend weekends on the slopes and crave something quick yet home-cooked at the end of the day, these 125 recipes are for you. Many involve slow-cookers or minimal prep work, so you can spend the day on your skis instead of behind the stove. Though I hardly ever cook red meat, the photo for Chunky Beef Stew caught my attention. The braised meat heats in the oven for six hours as the vegetables roast in a separate pan, to be combined at the end so they don't get mushy.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1999
David E. Becraft, a retired furnace and air conditioning repairman, died Saturday of colon cancer at Gilchrest Center for Hospice Care. He was 47.Mr. Becraft, who was known to almost everyone as "Porkchop" because of his childhood fondness for them, lived in the Dulany Street rowhouse in Southwest Baltimore, where he was raised.He would dress up as Santa Claus every Christmas and take gifts to friends and neighbors."He would buy thousands of dollars worth of toys and perfume and cologne and knickknacks, and two or three days before Christmas, he would go to houses where they didn't have any toys," said his sister, Sharon Dawson of Arbutus.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 2, 2004
Irish pubs are the reality shows of the restaurant world -- as close to a surefire hit as you can find in a very unsure business. The Towson area in particular seems to take to the concept. Witness the success of An Poitin Stil a little to the north. I waited an hour and a half for a table when it first opened five years ago. Now Ryan's Daughter has moved into the Belvedere Square spot where Chili's used to be. The name comes from the 1970 movie, a favorite of the owners, who also wanted to pay tribute to the Senator Theatre for keeping the Belvedere area alive in the lean years.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 14, 2003
I want to make beef barley soup and was told to use Scotch barley for my recipe. What is that, and is it different from just plain barley that comes in a box? Also, if you have a good beef barley recipe, I would like to compare it with the one I have. Well, there is Scotch barley, pearl barley, hulled barley, and a bunch of other types, but the only barley I'm really concerned about is the one they use to make beer. now that is good barley. As far as soup goes, the person who told you to use Scotch barley may have been thinking about "Scotch broth" (or maybe they weren't thinking at all)
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