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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 7, 2006
Ribs are the original hand-held food. They are portable; you can walk around surveying your domain as you gnaw on a bone. They feel good in your hand, creating a primal balance, especially if you have a cold beverage in your opposing hand. And when done right, they taste outasight. To paraphrase Professor Harold Hill of The Music Man, I consider the hours I spend with a rib in my hand to be golden. Until recently, most of my rib reveries came courtesy of pigs. Pork spareribs, those big boys cooked low and slow over a hickory fire, have been the centerpiece of many memorable feeds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | January 20, 2012
This week's dining review in Live is of Midtown BBQ & Brew, the successor to Midtown Yacht Club. Erik Maza has the review here . Former owner Nathan Beveridge is back, and Anthony Harrison is in as managing parnter and chef. Harrison is a big barbecue guy and his barbecue is big. "The portions at Midtown are big," Erik says. "Even the half-rack of ribs is intimidating, and leaves plenty of leftovers. " About those ribs, they're not baby-back ribs. They're beef ribs, so no they may not fall of the bone, as the Constitution requires, but they have good, strong flavor that doesn't come from added-on sauce.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | January 20, 2012
This week's dining review in Live is of Midtown BBQ & Brew, the successor to Midtown Yacht Club. Erik Maza has the review here . Former owner Nathan Beveridge is back, and Anthony Harrison is in as managing parnter and chef. Harrison is a big barbecue guy and his barbecue is big. "The portions at Midtown are big," Erik says. "Even the half-rack of ribs is intimidating, and leaves plenty of leftovers. " About those ribs, they're not baby-back ribs. They're beef ribs, so no they may not fall of the bone, as the Constitution requires, but they have good, strong flavor that doesn't come from added-on sauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Lately in Mount Vernon, especially in the vicinity of the Washington Monument, there's the faint but unmistakably syrupy aroma of barbecue in the air. Follow the trail and you'll find yourself at an unexpected place - the Midtown Yacht Club. The perennial after-work bar, Midtown, a staple in Mount Vernon under various names since the '80s, long-known for its peanut-shell-covered floors, has been redubbed Midtown BBQ & Brew. It's still a bar, but now it's also a barbecue restaurant, all under one roof.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2000
Before eating at U Jung, our experience with Korean food was, admittedly, limited. It didn't help that spelling and syntax are so flexible on U Jung's menu (both English and phonetically spelled Korean words) that we could not be sure what was what. Luckily, the waitstaff sized us up as soon as we came in and sent us an English-speaking server, the delightful In Won Yom, who dealt with our ignorance with humor and grace. Thanks to her ministrations, we had a splendid meal. The food was so good that we might have done just fine on our own. However, many non-Koreans -- including us -- could be turned off by the sound of such traditional fare as jae jang kuk (vegetable and noodle soup with cow's blood and bone)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 25, 2000
If you decided to create a restaurant from what the National Restaurant Association says are the hottest culinary trends right now, it would look something like the Malibu Grill in Columbia. Latino food. Check. Beef in quantity. Check. Tapas. Check. Throw in some margaritas and rich desserts for good measure, and put such a restaurant in one of the most pleasant settings imaginable, such as the green and peaceful waterfront of Columbia's Lake Kittamaqundi. Voila! A can't-miss prospect.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
Walk into Kloby's Smokehouse, and the first thing you notice is the smell. The rich aroma of meat being smoked for barbecue hangs thick in the air. It's a hint of what lies ahead, and part of the reason why this popular Laurel restaurant recently had to expand. The barbecue here is good. Really good. Opened only two months ago, Kloby's new restaurant and bar is attached to the old bar and carryout. The orange-and-yellow walls are adorned with TVs and firefighter regalia (the owner was formerly a firefighter)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Lately in Mount Vernon, especially in the vicinity of the Washington Monument, there's the faint but unmistakably syrupy aroma of barbecue in the air. Follow the trail and you'll find yourself at an unexpected place - the Midtown Yacht Club. The perennial after-work bar, Midtown, a staple in Mount Vernon under various names since the '80s, long-known for its peanut-shell-covered floors, has been redubbed Midtown BBQ & Brew. It's still a bar, but now it's also a barbecue restaurant, all under one roof.
NEWS
February 16, 2005
It was Super Sunday and we were in the mood for meat - grilled, sauce-dripping, artery-clogging meat - to match the prevailing game-day mood. So we headed out to the country - or at least Ellicott City - and pulled into Bare Bones Grill & Brewery. Situated in a spanking-clean shopping plaza on Baltimore National Pike, Bare Bones features wood floors and a big bar with plenty of televisions and a pair of long horns over the door. There's also an alcove for carryout orders, which is where we headed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special To The Sun | March 13, 2008
There's nothing quite like barbecue to get the mouth watering, especially when it's dry-rubbed and then slow-cooked in a smoker. Kloby's Backyard Barbecue began dishing out smoky chicken and giant, sauce-slathered beef ribs from a small shop in Woodlawn four years ago. The restaurant, in the Dogwood Shopping Center, is emphatically casual, with wood picnic tables arranged on the concrete floor, and photographed close-ups of barbecued chicken and ribs...
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
Walk into Kloby's Smokehouse, and the first thing you notice is the smell. The rich aroma of meat being smoked for barbecue hangs thick in the air. It's a hint of what lies ahead, and part of the reason why this popular Laurel restaurant recently had to expand. The barbecue here is good. Really good. Opened only two months ago, Kloby's new restaurant and bar is attached to the old bar and carryout. The orange-and-yellow walls are adorned with TVs and firefighter regalia (the owner was formerly a firefighter)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 7, 2006
Ribs are the original hand-held food. They are portable; you can walk around surveying your domain as you gnaw on a bone. They feel good in your hand, creating a primal balance, especially if you have a cold beverage in your opposing hand. And when done right, they taste outasight. To paraphrase Professor Harold Hill of The Music Man, I consider the hours I spend with a rib in my hand to be golden. Until recently, most of my rib reveries came courtesy of pigs. Pork spareribs, those big boys cooked low and slow over a hickory fire, have been the centerpiece of many memorable feeds.
NEWS
February 16, 2005
It was Super Sunday and we were in the mood for meat - grilled, sauce-dripping, artery-clogging meat - to match the prevailing game-day mood. So we headed out to the country - or at least Ellicott City - and pulled into Bare Bones Grill & Brewery. Situated in a spanking-clean shopping plaza on Baltimore National Pike, Bare Bones features wood floors and a big bar with plenty of televisions and a pair of long horns over the door. There's also an alcove for carryout orders, which is where we headed.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 25, 2000
If you decided to create a restaurant from what the National Restaurant Association says are the hottest culinary trends right now, it would look something like the Malibu Grill in Columbia. Latino food. Check. Beef in quantity. Check. Tapas. Check. Throw in some margaritas and rich desserts for good measure, and put such a restaurant in one of the most pleasant settings imaginable, such as the green and peaceful waterfront of Columbia's Lake Kittamaqundi. Voila! A can't-miss prospect.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2000
Before eating at U Jung, our experience with Korean food was, admittedly, limited. It didn't help that spelling and syntax are so flexible on U Jung's menu (both English and phonetically spelled Korean words) that we could not be sure what was what. Luckily, the waitstaff sized us up as soon as we came in and sent us an English-speaking server, the delightful In Won Yom, who dealt with our ignorance with humor and grace. Thanks to her ministrations, we had a splendid meal. The food was so good that we might have done just fine on our own. However, many non-Koreans -- including us -- could be turned off by the sound of such traditional fare as jae jang kuk (vegetable and noodle soup with cow's blood and bone)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2014
From: Lodi, Calif Price: $14 Serve with: Beef short ribs, lamb shanks This full-bodied red wine packs a flavorful punch, even if it isn't the most elegant cabernet in California. It offers a full measure of cassis, black raspberry and blackberry fruit, with hints of chocolate cake and coffee. This is not a wine to serve with rack of lamb or beef filet, but would make a wonderful match with some of the less-exalted cuts of red meat. There's lots of burly charm here at an excellent price.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 1997
FOR THE PAST six months, neighbors on Mountain Road have watched a familiar landmark, Berger's Restaurant, undergo transformation.The building, which has been sitting empty for years, will soon be a Texas Road House restaurant.For weeks, local craftsmen have swarmed the building at all hours, performing magic. At the same time, some 150 people hired as staff are being trained. The parking lot is looking as crowded as it did in the days when Berger's dark and intimate rooms were the local spot to celebrate an occasion.
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