Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBeef Cattle
IN THE NEWS

Beef Cattle

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | July 21, 2013
John Archer, a longtime Angus cattle breeder at Mount Yoe Farm in Darlington, was recognized recently for having the High Sale Order Index Angus bull at the Southwest Virginia Bull Test sponsored by the Virginia Beef Cattle Improvement Association. This bull had the highest test Average Daily Gain out of the 59 Angus bulls tested. This December 2011-born bull, Mt. Yoe OT26-200, was sired by Weaverland Objective OT26 99 and his dam was Mt. Yoe Rosebud 210. The Virginia Beef Cattle Improvement Association has served the Virginia Cattle Industry for more than 50 years through the coordination of the Central Bull Test Program in the state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | July 21, 2013
John Archer, a longtime Angus cattle breeder at Mount Yoe Farm in Darlington, was recognized recently for having the High Sale Order Index Angus bull at the Southwest Virginia Bull Test sponsored by the Virginia Beef Cattle Improvement Association. This bull had the highest test Average Daily Gain out of the 59 Angus bulls tested. This December 2011-born bull, Mt. Yoe OT26-200, was sired by Weaverland Objective OT26 99 and his dam was Mt. Yoe Rosebud 210. The Virginia Beef Cattle Improvement Association has served the Virginia Cattle Industry for more than 50 years through the coordination of the Central Bull Test Program in the state.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 5, 2004
Fair schedule The Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair continues through tomorrow at the Carroll County Agriculture Center on Smith Avenue in Westminster. Here is the schedule of activities for today and tomorrow, but fair-goers should be aware that programs can change without notice. Today: Beef Cattle, Senior Citizens' and Grandparents' Day 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.: Senior citizen exhibits entered and judged in Blizzard Hall. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.: Indoor exhibit building open. 9 a.m.: Informal demonstrations in Blizzard Hall.
NEWS
August 5, 2004
Fair schedule The Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair continues through tomorrow at the Carroll County Agriculture Center on Smith Avenue in Westminster. Here is the schedule of activities for today and tomorrow, but fair-goers should be aware that programs can change without notice. Today: Beef Cattle, Senior Citizens' and Grandparents' Day 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.: Senior citizen exhibits entered and judged in Blizzard Hall. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.: Indoor exhibit building open. 9 a.m.: Informal demonstrations in Blizzard Hall.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
Think about it from the cow's point of view. Most comfortable at 50 degrees or cooler, she has to lug her 1,400 pounds through those 95-degree afternoons that have been so common this summer. Her owner is afraid the wells will run dry so he has stopped spritzing her regularly, and, unlike a person, she can't sweat away her body heat. Can you blame her for not wanting to eat the gobs of food that keep her milk flowing? Dried-up reservoirs and dying crops might get more attention, but droughts wreak havoc on dairy and beef cattle farmers as well.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
Visitors heading to the Mullinix farm near Lisbon for a day of free tours and activities Saturday might want to take a careful look around. The family has one of the few full-scale beef cattle operations in the state - the only one in Howard County - and that part of the farm likely will disappear in a few years. "I love what I'm doing," said Gene Mullinix, who runs the farm with his wife, Charlotte, their family and several workers, "but it's a dying way of life." The Mullinixes' farmland is in agricultural preservation, and Gene Mullinix said he will continue with some kind of farming.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 6, 1996
AN ASSISTANT honcho from the Motor Vehicle Administration ended up on the hot seat the other day when he came before the state Board of Public Works to talk about the touchy (and timely, if you've been following This Just In) subject of customer service.Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein, who was chairing the board's preliminary meeting, cited Monday's TJI, which described how a 28-year-old Columbia woman named Lori Britton was forced to stand in line for almost two hours at the MVA offices in Glen Burnie with a cast on her leg and crutches under her arms.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
Extension Office plans more winter workshops The Carroll County Extension Office will offer its winter series of workshops dealing with a variety of agriculture topics from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Remaining workshops are: Wednesday: "Changes and Updates on Carroll County AgLand Preservation Program" by Ralph Robertson Jr., preservation specialist. March 9: "Beef Carcass Data - What Does it Mean and How Can I Use It?" by Scott Barao, extension specialist, Beef Cattle Management and Sheep Programs.
NEWS
March 4, 2007
Former County Commissioner Donald Dell and his family were recently inducted into the Maryland Governor's Agriculture Hall of Fame. Four generations of the Dell family operate Cranberry Meadow Farm, which includes a 180-cow dairy with top genetics; Black Angus beef cattle; 3,300 acres of corn, soybeans and small grains; and a grain elevator. The Dells have incorporated conservation best management practices since the 1950s, have supported agricultural land preservation, and continue to run a profitable, diversified operation, according to the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
Six county 4-H'ers will attend the National 4-H Congress in Chicago in December, where their record books will be matched against others from across the country.The six young women were winners at the state level for the work they did on their record books, which are detailed accounts of the accomplishments they've made in a certain project area.The winners are:* Ashley Bair, 17, of Westminster, for gardening.Miss Bair said she has taught many workshops on gardening and participated in horticulture judging competitions.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
Visitors heading to the Mullinix farm near Lisbon for a day of free tours and activities Saturday might want to take a careful look around. The family has one of the few full-scale beef cattle operations in the state - the only one in Howard County - and that part of the farm likely will disappear in a few years. "I love what I'm doing," said Gene Mullinix, who runs the farm with his wife, Charlotte, their family and several workers, "but it's a dying way of life." The Mullinixes' farmland is in agricultural preservation, and Gene Mullinix said he will continue with some kind of farming.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
Think about it from the cow's point of view. Most comfortable at 50 degrees or cooler, she has to lug her 1,400 pounds through those 95-degree afternoons that have been so common this summer. Her owner is afraid the wells will run dry so he has stopped spritzing her regularly, and, unlike a person, she can't sweat away her body heat. Can you blame her for not wanting to eat the gobs of food that keep her milk flowing? Dried-up reservoirs and dying crops might get more attention, but droughts wreak havoc on dairy and beef cattle farmers as well.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 6, 1996
AN ASSISTANT honcho from the Motor Vehicle Administration ended up on the hot seat the other day when he came before the state Board of Public Works to talk about the touchy (and timely, if you've been following This Just In) subject of customer service.Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein, who was chairing the board's preliminary meeting, cited Monday's TJI, which described how a 28-year-old Columbia woman named Lori Britton was forced to stand in line for almost two hours at the MVA offices in Glen Burnie with a cast on her leg and crutches under her arms.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2000
The grain is harvested, the last of the autumn vegetables are picked, and a farmer can kick back in the easy chair for the rest of winter, right? Not quite. The equipment that ran full steam at harvesttime has to be cleaned and repaired. Cattle and hogs still need to eat. Dairy cows have to be milked twice a day, every day. And then there are all the little things -- including family time -- that went by the wayside during the rush of the harvest season. "Some people think farmers are on vacation from harvest to planting," said Genevia Meeks, whose husband, Lawrence, runs his 2,000-acre grain farm in Silver Run, north of Westminster.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.