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By Joe Stumpe and Joe Stumpe,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2005
Sometimes only roast beef will do. You know the kind of roast we're talking about - seasoned crust, big beefy flavor and juicy center. Not a fancy steak you can cut with a butter knife, or a pot roast braised until it's falling apart, but an honest piece of meat with flavor and texture. The problem is how to achieve this ideal roast. All too often, roast beef turns out as tough, dry, stringy and flavorless as the proverbial shoe leather. In fact, I'm convinced that's why roast beef seems to turn up on a lot fewer tables these days.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
Orioles slugger Chris Davis, suspended recently for using a banned stimulant, was caught amid a leaguewide crackdown that began three years ago as players' use of Adderall spiked, according to sports physicians and other experts. Amphetamines — a drug with addictive properties — have long been a part of the game's darker side. Even the home run record-setting Hank Aaron acknowledged using the stimulants, once commonly known as "greenies. " The action by Major League Baseball sheds light on growing concern about amphetamines — a type of drug that has become increasingly potent.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2009
W hen you visit the heartland of America, sometimes you overindulge on beef. It's easy to do, especially when you get off a plane on the Wednesday night before Thanksgiving at 10:50 p.m., snatch your luggage off the carousel, stand in a long line to rent a car and drive an hour to the hotel, only to discover that your 15-year-old son is starving, just starving! What's more, he can't possibly go to sleep unless he has something to eat. Right now. At 1 in the morning in Indianapolis, you can usually find just two places open for a snack that late: Steak 'n' Shake and White Castle.
NEWS
By Thomas Maronick Jr | August 6, 2014
A decision last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, upholding federal regulations requiring that meat labels state where the animal was born, raised and slaughtered, is a win for consumers, public health and American meat producers. It means that mystery meat from third-world sweat shops will be far less de rigueur for the discerning public, along with the substantial health risks associated with food from questionable sources. As detailed in a number of books - particularly Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" (1906)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
One of the staples of Maryland eating is pit beef. There's something special about the flavor produced when cooking a beef roast over fire. It's not the most common sandwich to see at the stadium, but when done correctly, it makes for an easy and extremely tasty tailgate. This recipe has you doing most of the cooking at home before the game, with an easy reheating step at the parking lot. Maryland-style pit beef Makes 10-15 sandwiches 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon chili powder 4-6 pounds top, bottom or eye round beef roast 10-15 soft kaiser rolls 2 large white onions (sliced very thin)
NEWS
By Thomas Maronick Jr | August 6, 2014
A decision last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, upholding federal regulations requiring that meat labels state where the animal was born, raised and slaughtered, is a win for consumers, public health and American meat producers. It means that mystery meat from third-world sweat shops will be far less de rigueur for the discerning public, along with the substantial health risks associated with food from questionable sources. As detailed in a number of books - particularly Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" (1906)
BUSINESS
By Baltimore Sun staff | September 30, 2010
Baltimore baseball legend and former Oriole Cal Ripken Jr. is teaming with Long Valley, N.J.-based Florio Sports LLC to sell a beef jerky snack, the sports firm announced Wednesday. The jerky, called Ripken Power Shred, is available only online at http://www.chewjerky.com until spring of 2011 when the product will be available in retail outlets. The snack, which is made from "lean American beef," according to a news release, will debut at the National Association of Convenience Stores trade show in Atlanta from Tuesday through Friday.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2003
On a scorched afternoon a few days ago, two men sat in the deliciously cool black-lacquer- and-leopard-print dining room of the Prime Rib, Baltimore's high temple of carnivorous cuisine. The table between them was empty except for an open bottle of San Pellegrino water, an untouched ramekin of raw horseradish and dinner plates holding six New York strip steaks. One of the men, David Derewicz, the restaurant's affable and well-fed-looking general manager, sliced directly into the center of each perfectly cooked slab.
FEATURES
By Michael Dorgan and Michael Dorgan,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 25, 1990
COALINGA, CALIF.-- Some ranchers think a fat, black, sway-backed breed of Japanese cattle may do for the U.S. cattle industry what the American silicon chip has done for the Japanese computer industry."
NEWS
December 30, 2003
IF THE DISCOVERY of a single case of mad cow disease in the United States is not a cause for panic or overreaction, it does nonetheless raise serious questions about safeguards against the illness, and it illuminates larger concerns stemming from the grotesque industrialization of the meat-packing business. The good news for American cattle farmers is that the infected cow, which had been living on a dairy farm in Washington, apparently came from Canada; the bad news is that until last May the United States was importing about a million cattle a year from its northern neighbor.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Bob Creager opened his tiny pit beef stand in the parking lot of a Southeast Baltimore nightclub in 1987. The stand had no electricity. Creager had never run a business. And the former steelworker had no idea how to cook pit beef. "I was struggling," Creager says. These days, Creager's establishment - Chaps Pit Beef - is a Baltimore legend. His stand, in the parking lot of the Gentlemen's Gold Club on Pulaski Highway, has been featured on national television shows five times.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
In reference to the article, "Obama readies Afghan exit" (May 28), and speaking as a retired educator and a retired U.S. Navy officer who served on active duty in World War II over five years in the Pacific and later recalled in 1950 for three more years during the Korean War, I completely disagree with President Barack Obama's decision to withdraw our military forces from Afghanistan and the surrounding areas by the end of 2016. Personally, I believe it to be only a political maneuver in order to enhance the election of more Democratic officials in 21016.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Verizon Communications announced this week that its expanded Fios DVR television service is now available in the Baltimore region. The Quantum TV set top box can record six or 12 programs at once, depending on the customer's service plan, said Harry J. Mitchell, a Verizon spokesman. The box is capable of storing up to 200 hours of HD programming. The compact Quantum box replaces Fios existing hardware and can serve up to four additional televisions via a compact companion device.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
After a 2013 schedule in which Loyola tangled with Maryland, UMBC and Delaware, the team replaced that trio with Penn State, Virginia and a Patriot League opponent. The upcoming campaign begins Thursday night when the Greyhounds pay a visit to the Cavaliers. Coach Charley Toomey said he has been attempting for several years to secure regular-season contests against Virginia and North Carolina and finally got his wish when Cavaliers coach Dom Starsia agreed to the series. Unlike some of his peers, Toomey said he welcomes opening the season against a difficult opponent like Virginia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
One of the staples of Maryland eating is pit beef. There's something special about the flavor produced when cooking a beef roast over fire. It's not the most common sandwich to see at the stadium, but when done correctly, it makes for an easy and extremely tasty tailgate. This recipe has you doing most of the cooking at home before the game, with an easy reheating step at the parking lot. Maryland-style pit beef Makes 10-15 sandwiches 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon chili powder 4-6 pounds top, bottom or eye round beef roast 10-15 soft kaiser rolls 2 large white onions (sliced very thin)
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 22, 2013
Baltimore's own Abbey Burger Bistro opened up shop in Ocean City this June, and despite a slow summer for many businesses, owner Eric Leatherman said he has seen a steady increase in customers during the past two weeks. The original Abbey Burger Bistro could be described as a hole in the wall down an alley near Cross Street Market in Federal Hill. Like the original, this place has fantastic burgers and a healthy selection of beer. Unlike the original, the Ocean City location isn't small -- the new restaurant has easily twice the seating of the Federal Hill branch.
NEWS
April 7, 2013
Once again our beloved governor is crowing about his responsible spending cuts while in office. In a recent opinion piece for The Sun, he wrote that over the last six years "Maryland has taken a balanced approach when it comes to fiscal policy - making responsible cuts to spending while prioritizing investments in jobs, opportunity, and a stronger middle class" ("Replace the sequester before it's too late," April 4). Since the budget has gone from $27 billion to more than $36 billion since 2007, when Mr. O'Malley took office, I would like to know just what cuts the governor has actually made.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Over a period of about five hours, a man was shot and two people were beaten early Wednesday in what police say is part of a surge in street robberies across the city. A wave of these street robberies over the last few weeks fit similar patterns of young adults or juveniles targeting distracted people and stealing their cellphones, wallets and other valuables and fleeing in cars, police said. Some cases involve suspects flashing guns, making threats or assaulting or shooting victims, according to victims and police reports.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 29, 2013
When Munir Bahar, the 32-year-old chief organizer of the 300 Men March, told me he used a dirt bike show to lure people into the street to hear his anti-violence speech, I winced. The operation of dirt bikes on city streets is illegal. They are widely considered a menace by people who live in Baltimore's rowhouse neighborhoods. Homeowners frequently call the police to complain about dirt bikes. But one man's noisy nuisance is another's rapscallion pleasure or, in Bahar's thinking, a way to draw a crowd.
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