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By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2003
An insect that leaves beech trees vulnerable to a fatal fungus has been found for the first time in Maryland, state officials announced yesterday. They fear it marks the start of devastation for a species that represents roughly 20 percent of the state's forests. The beech scale insect - which has killed trees in large areas of New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and West Virginia - was discovered in trees near the southern Garrett County town of Kempton, said Robert Rabaglia, an entomologist with the Maryland Department of Agriculture's Forest Pest Management Section.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 13, 2012
The champion is dead - long live the champion.  The grand American beech in Mary Azrael's backyard in Mount Washington was at least 160 years old and had reigned officially as the city's premier tree of that species for nearly two decades.  But time slowly took its toll, and Azrael reluctantly hired a tree expert to take it down Tuesday after being advised it was in such poor shape it could fall or drop a limb at any time, posing a safety hazard....
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SPORTS
November 26, 2007
Moves Hockey BLUE JACKETS -- Placed C Kris Beech on IR.
SPORTS
November 26, 2007
Moves Hockey BLUE JACKETS -- Placed C Kris Beech on IR.
NEWS
November 6, 1992
POLICE LOG* Wilde Lake: 10900 block of Beech Creek Drive: A window screen was cut Tuesday and a window was found open 6 inches. There was no entry.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
Edward Paul Moylan, 63, IWIF claims directorEdward Paul Moylan, retired director of claims for the state Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, died Wednesday of lung cancer at North Arundel Hospital. He was 63 and lived in Glen Burnie.The Baltimore native left high school in 1953 and enlisted in the Army. He spent three years in Europe defusing mines, bombs and artillery shells -- among them, a World War I German mustard gas shell that discharged in his face in Verdun, France, and permanently scarred his lungs.
SPORTS
August 22, 1998
Braves: Atlanta had its 18th sellout of the season, drawing a crowd of 48,268 to Turner Field.Diamondbacks: Since coming off the disabled list with a left groin strain on Aug. 9, Travis Lee is 7-for-51 (.137).Giants: First baseman J. T. Snow didn't start because tendinitis in his right shoulder, but he played first base in the ninth inning.Padres: First baseman Wally Joyner left the game in the sixth because of tightness is his right quadriceps. He was day-to-day.Phillies: Starter Matt Beech will undergo exploratory surgery on his left (throwing)
NEWS
May 28, 2004
On May 25, 2004, in Charlotte, NC, age 93, formerly of Ellicott City, MD. He is survived by a sister Daisy Gue of Cockeysville, MD, three daughters, one son, grandchildren and a great-granddaughter. Memorial service will be held 11 A. M Saturday, May 29, Chapel of the Oaks, 500 Providence Road, Charlotte, NC. Memorial donations may be made to the Beech Mountain Fire Department, POB 436, Banner Elk, NC, 28604.
BUSINESS
By Sean Mussenden and Sean Mussenden,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 29, 2004
Jim and Pat Beech had planned a special trip to Walt Disney World just to see the 75 Mickey Mouse statues that were installed last fall in honor of the mouse's 75th birthday. But Disney shipped the Mickeys out of town last Wednesday, angering some vacationers. The statues headed for Walt Disney Co.'s annual meeting in Philadelphia this Wednesday. "I don't think having them at a shareholders' meeting is fair to all the vacationers who had hoped to see them. Personally, I think it's real poor," said Beech, a Northern Virginia computer specialist who estimates he and his wife have visited Walt Disney World 20 or 30 times since honeymooning at the park in 1983.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 18, 2005
A decade ago, new businesses in Howard County were failing at alarming rates, although the county was one of the wealthiest areas in the nation and enjoying healthy growth. It was a chilling contrast for Richard W. Story, chief executive of the county's Economic Development Authority. He realized something was needed to improve the odds, if only slightly, for those braving the savagery of the free-market system. So he formed the Business Resource Center in Columbia, consolidating the myriad programs and services available to startups.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 18, 2005
A decade ago, new businesses in Howard County were failing at alarming rates, although the county was one of the wealthiest areas in the nation and enjoying healthy growth. It was a chilling contrast for Richard W. Story, chief executive of the county's Economic Development Authority. He realized something was needed to improve the odds, if only slightly, for those braving the savagery of the free-market system. So he formed the Business Resource Center in Columbia, consolidating the myriad programs and services available to startups.
NEWS
May 28, 2004
On May 25, 2004, in Charlotte, NC, age 93, formerly of Ellicott City, MD. He is survived by a sister Daisy Gue of Cockeysville, MD, three daughters, one son, grandchildren and a great-granddaughter. Memorial service will be held 11 A. M Saturday, May 29, Chapel of the Oaks, 500 Providence Road, Charlotte, NC. Memorial donations may be made to the Beech Mountain Fire Department, POB 436, Banner Elk, NC, 28604.
BUSINESS
By Sean Mussenden and Sean Mussenden,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 29, 2004
Jim and Pat Beech had planned a special trip to Walt Disney World just to see the 75 Mickey Mouse statues that were installed last fall in honor of the mouse's 75th birthday. But Disney shipped the Mickeys out of town last Wednesday, angering some vacationers. The statues headed for Walt Disney Co.'s annual meeting in Philadelphia this Wednesday. "I don't think having them at a shareholders' meeting is fair to all the vacationers who had hoped to see them. Personally, I think it's real poor," said Beech, a Northern Virginia computer specialist who estimates he and his wife have visited Walt Disney World 20 or 30 times since honeymooning at the park in 1983.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2003
An insect that leaves beech trees vulnerable to a fatal fungus has been found for the first time in Maryland, state officials announced yesterday. They fear it marks the start of devastation for a species that represents roughly 20 percent of the state's forests. The beech scale insect - which has killed trees in large areas of New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and West Virginia - was discovered in trees near the southern Garrett County town of Kempton, said Robert Rabaglia, an entomologist with the Maryland Department of Agriculture's Forest Pest Management Section.
NEWS
By Todd Holden and Todd Holden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2003
When Johnny Roo Adams sold his home last year and moved, he had to leave behind a real trophy, a living trophy. It's a copper beech and it's a state champion in the Maryland Big Tree Program. Measuring 16 feet, 9 inches in diameter at breast height, standing 75 feet tall with a crown spread of more than 65 feet, it stands in the 2200 block of Rock Spring Road, just south of Forest Hill. The Rock Spring Road beech is the largest copper beech in Maryland, but it often goes unnoticed by the motorists traveling along busy Route 24. Route 24 has been widened several times to deal with increasing traffic, so it's something of a miracle that the stately copper beech still stands, so close to the two-story frame house directly behind it. Another miracle of survival stands within spitting distance of Smith Road, just off U.S. 1 approaching Darlington.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | April 4, 2002
RENSSELAERVILLE, N.Y. - Surveying the young forests of the Helderberg Mountains in 1939, the naturalist Eugene Odum predicted that one day they would be ruled by giant stands of maple, hemlock and beech. But when scientists from the State University of New York at Albany returned to the Edmund Niles Huyck Preserve and Biological Research Station to repeat Odum's work 60 years later, instead of smooth, gray-barked beech trees towering over the forest floor, they found a landscape full of signs of death and disease.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 13, 2012
The champion is dead - long live the champion.  The grand American beech in Mary Azrael's backyard in Mount Washington was at least 160 years old and had reigned officially as the city's premier tree of that species for nearly two decades.  But time slowly took its toll, and Azrael reluctantly hired a tree expert to take it down Tuesday after being advised it was in such poor shape it could fall or drop a limb at any time, posing a safety hazard....
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | April 4, 2002
RENSSELAERVILLE, N.Y. - Surveying the young forests of the Helderberg Mountains in 1939, the naturalist Eugene Odum predicted that one day they would be ruled by giant stands of maple, hemlock and beech. But when scientists from the State University of New York at Albany returned to the Edmund Niles Huyck Preserve and Biological Research Station to repeat Odum's work 60 years later, instead of smooth, gray-barked beech trees towering over the forest floor, they found a landscape full of signs of death and disease.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 9, 2000
WASHINGTON - H. J. Heinz Co. was barred by a federal appeals court yesterday from buying the owner of rival baby-food maker Beech-Nut while antitrust authorities press their case to stop the merger. A federal appeals court issued an emergency injunction to halt the takeover while it considers a lower court's refusal to enjoin the merger of two of the three major U.S. makers of jarred baby food. The Federal Trade Commission argued that the combination of Heinz and Beech-Nut, which share about 30 percent of the U.S. baby-food market, would reduce competition.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
Edward Paul Moylan, 63, IWIF claims directorEdward Paul Moylan, retired director of claims for the state Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, died Wednesday of lung cancer at North Arundel Hospital. He was 63 and lived in Glen Burnie.The Baltimore native left high school in 1953 and enlisted in the Army. He spent three years in Europe defusing mines, bombs and artillery shells -- among them, a World War I German mustard gas shell that discharged in his face in Verdun, France, and permanently scarred his lungs.
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