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NEWS
June 7, 1995
Howard County is considered one of the more potent economic pockets in the state. Yet if you want a measure of how fragile is Maryland's economic bedrock, it may be a good place to look.On the surface, Howard seems as strong as ever. Lavish subdivisions are still going up. A wave of "superstores" has some countians wondering how much shopping is too much. And in Columbia, a new village pool just opened to the delight of residents who previously fretted about having to drive a few minutes for a swim.
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NEWS
September 2, 2012
Your recent commentary on information technology is yet another slant on the increased need for education to work our way out of the current economic recession ("Tech to the rescue," Aug. 27). I will go along with an increased need for IT personnel, even if IT seems to cover a multitude of job descriptions of varying skill levels. According to this your article, only 30 percent to 45 percent of high school graduates are ready to take college level math and science courses, yet that might be enough to supply all the graduates the country needs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | March 13, 2008
Taking over a club known for its live music and steering it in a different direction can be a struggle for new owners. A couple of years ago, two shuttered music venues -- the Royal on Light Street and the Vault on Baltimore Street -- were bought and converted into bar/lounges. In both cases, the new owners tried to establish a fresh identity and eventually opted to bring back live music to help bolster business. I reviewed both of these bars soon after they originally opened. But they've changed enough to merit a second look.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2008
Bedrock's Sidecar Grill feels like the kind of contemporary retro spot where characters on teen television shows gather for french fries and pizza. Think of it as the Peach Pit for the quickly evolving west side. This bright new dining space is attached to the Bedrock pool lounge and nightclub, which itself has the easygoing vibe of a university union - two levels of boozy fun in a mammoth old bank building, with seven pool tables at last count. The Sidecar Grill is sweet-looking, its walls and tile floor done up in the colors of midcentury kitchen appliances, the booths with Formica-style tabletops.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
Like many of his Marriottsville neighbors, Arthur Grace's emotions ran the gamut -- concern, anger and even joy -- when he heard that toxic solvents had seeped into bedrock below Howard County's 12-year-old landfill and that a landfill expansion study had been scrapped.One reaction escaped him, however."I'm personally not surprised at all that they've discovered this problem. It was only a matter of time," said the Sand Hill Road DTC resident. "We've been trying to tell them this all along.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
High levels of toxic chemicals have been discovered in ground water below Howard County's Alpha Ridge Landfill in Marriottsville, deeper than county officials have said the contaminants could penetrate.Toxic solvents normally used for grease-cutting, dry cleaning or paint removal -- several of them suspected to cause cancer -- were found in bedrock at levels many times higher than federal drinking water standards.The results could change county officials' thinking about whether nearby residents' drinking water is protected from landfill contaminants, said county public works Director James M. Irvin.
NEWS
August 10, 2002
Archbald Pothole State Park has its own Web site that, among other things, describes when and how the pothole was formed. The site is at www. dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/ parks/archbald.htm. Here is an excerpt from the explanation provided on the site: "A pothole usually is a hole which is worn into the bedrock of a stream at the base of waterfalls or in strong rapids. The moving water spins sand, gravel and rock fragments in any small indentation in the bedrock. After enough time, the sand and stones carve out an elliptical hole.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
An environmental report recommends extensive testing and monitoring by the developer of a proposed golf course and country club at the historic Hayfields Farm in northern Baltimore County for its potential effect on ground and surface water.The report was cited yesterday by the lawyer representing opponents of the project in seeking a delay of a county zoning hearing that began yesterday. The request was denied by Zoning Commissioner Lawrence E. Schmidt. The Mangione family, developers and operators of Turf Valley Hotel and Country Club in Howard County, is seeking a zoning exception to develop an 18-hole country club golf course on the agriculturally zoned farm.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | May 27, 1993
Just a stone's throw from make-believe Bedrock, residents of Agua Dulce, Calif., a rural community 45 miles north of Los Angeles, are unhappy about the recent invasion of outsiders looking for a yabba-dabba-do time.It seems the filming of Steven Spielberg's live-action movie "The Flintstones" has captured the public's imagination like no other production at Vasquez Rocks County Park, which has been the backdrop of hundreds of movies, television shows and commercials.To the displeasure of nearby residents, authorities say thousands of sightseers have turned out recently to visit the movie set in the heart of the park, where the fabled prehistoric town has been created.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Your recent commentary on information technology is yet another slant on the increased need for education to work our way out of the current economic recession ("Tech to the rescue," Aug. 27). I will go along with an increased need for IT personnel, even if IT seems to cover a multitude of job descriptions of varying skill levels. According to this your article, only 30 percent to 45 percent of high school graduates are ready to take college level math and science courses, yet that might be enough to supply all the graduates the country needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | March 13, 2008
Taking over a club known for its live music and steering it in a different direction can be a struggle for new owners. A couple of years ago, two shuttered music venues -- the Royal on Light Street and the Vault on Baltimore Street -- were bought and converted into bar/lounges. In both cases, the new owners tried to establish a fresh identity and eventually opted to bring back live music to help bolster business. I reviewed both of these bars soon after they originally opened. But they've changed enough to merit a second look.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | August 17, 2006
Let's say you're going to see a play at the Hippodrome Theatre. The Hipp Cafe inside the building is jampacked, and you're in the mood for something more casual than Maggie Moore's, the Irish restaurant and bar across the street. Until a few weeks ago, you didn't have another nearby bar to hang out pre-show. But now that Bedrock Billiards is open, there's a more colorful, casual member of the growing west side nightlife family. Think of Bedrock Billiards as the laid-back uncle who wore suits with wild colors to weddings but somehow pulled it off. It was probably his attitude - constant, utter coolness - that let him get away with almost anything.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 14, 2006
The scene plays out every day along the Beltway, Interstate 95 or some other major highway of choice: Two cars sit alongside the road, post-collision, with a tow truck preparing to take one away. And as drivers whir by, rubbernecking their heads to get a glimpse of the scene, two thoughts inevitably creep in, namely, "How did that happen?" and "Man, am I glad that's not me." These crashes, metaphorically speaking, of course, are happening more and more in high school sports, to the point where they'll happen too fast and too close to witness from a distance.
NEWS
August 10, 2002
Archbald Pothole State Park has its own Web site that, among other things, describes when and how the pothole was formed. The site is at www. dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/ parks/archbald.htm. Here is an excerpt from the explanation provided on the site: "A pothole usually is a hole which is worn into the bedrock of a stream at the base of waterfalls or in strong rapids. The moving water spins sand, gravel and rock fragments in any small indentation in the bedrock. After enough time, the sand and stones carve out an elliptical hole.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and By Jonathan Pitts,Sun Staff | December 16, 2001
On a hillside slash of verdant green 30 minutes west of Washington, two modest gray barns adjoin in silence. It's peaceful here. This might be a good place to stable horses, keep a few head of cattle. Step inside, though, and you get it right away. The burnished golden timbers - the flooring, the walls, the rafters, the 352-seat theater - say, "Hush and listen; go back in time." The Barns of Wolf Trap, now 200 years old, were moved 20 years ago from their home in upstate New York to Vienna, Va., and reconstructed using 18th-century techniques.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2001
HUDSON FALLS, N.Y. - For decades, the crumbling limestone walls of the old Allen Mill concealed a secret. Deep inside, a 150-year-old tunnel and a long-forgotten wooden gate that were part of the mill's early Industrial Era water-power system on the upper Hudson River were slowly rotting away. Finally, in 1991, the gate failed. A reservoir that had built up in the tunnel - a foul stew of PCBs, solvents and oils that had seeped through the porous shale bedrock from the General Electric capacitor factory just up the riverbank - surged into the Hudson.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
Joan Develin Coley's academic ascent to the presidency of Western Maryland College began at the foundation of learning - reading. She came to the school in Westminster in 1973 as an assistant professor of education, coordinating the graduate program in reading that certified teachers as reading specialists. That was after she received a Ph.D. in education from the University of Maryland, College Park in the teaching of reading. Coley, who last month was named Western Maryland's eighth president, was the school's acting president after Robert Chambers went on a sabbatical in December.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
A collection of rocks inscribed with religious slogans in Joanne Caldwell's front yard has set up this confrontation: religion vs. neighborhood rules.Caldwell, who lives near New Market in Frederick County, says the rocks were divine inspiration. The Lake Linganore community association says they're unsightly and must be removed or Caldwell will face stiff fines.Lined up in front of her house in the 6500 block of Edgewood Road, the rocks proclaim Caldwell's Christian faith: "Love Jesus Forever" and "Mary's Special Blessing" are written in marker on two groupings of stones.
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